Training course expense Training course expense - Page 3
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  1. #21

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    That this often comes up for debate just shows how unclear the rules are IMO.

    At a high level, my understanding is if the training directly relates to your job and is simply an improvement or embellishment of an existing skill as it relates to your job, then it's allowable (it has to pass the wholly, exclusively and necessarily test).

    If the training is to put you in the position to do your job then it wouldn't be allowable.

    The tricky thing is determining whether or not it relates to your job. If you're a contractor then IMO your job is to be able to competently perform the role that your employer (YourCo) has currently contracted you to do with ClientCo or may reasonably be expected to contract you to do in the future based on your current skillset.

    So if you're an IT contractor and YourCo decided it wants to branch out into photography and you haven't got the first clue about photography then any photography course would not be claimable IMO as its putting you in the position to do your changing role.

    Where the lines get blurred is if you're a Java programmer and decide you want to start doing iOS development, would a course be allowable? To some it's a new skill, to others it's all IT/software related so it should be allowable. Is your role "Java programmer" or is it just "programmer". If you already know and use 3 different languages in different contracts does one more really significantly change your role?

    It's a matter of interpretation but as a software developer I would have no problem claiming for any programming related courses.

  2. #22

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    What is you opinion on one claiming the cost of becoming UK citizen (£1500), because the client only allows UK citizens to carry out the contract (e.g in defence sector)?

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by garnet View Post
    What is you opinion on one claiming the cost of becoming UK citizen (£1500), because the client only allows UK citizens to carry out the contract (e.g in defence sector)?
    Not allowable.
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  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by garnet View Post
    What is you opinion on one claiming the cost of becoming UK citizen (£1500), because the client only allows UK citizens to carry out the contract (e.g in defence sector)?
    No personal benefit there at all is there :
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  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by garnet View Post
    What is you opinion on one claiming the cost of becoming UK citizen (£1500), because the client only allows UK citizens to carry out the contract (e.g in defence sector)?
    Puts you in the position to do the job, not wholly, exclusively and necessarily for the purposes of your job IMO.

  6. #26

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    I agree.
    However long time ago first company I started as perm for paid similar amount for me to the state to get me a work permit. And this was not out of CEO's pocket. Company of 15 it was.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by northernladuk View Post
    No personal benefit there at all is there :
    Honestly, no. Not for someone who is permanent resident here anyway.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by garnet View Post
    I agree.
    However long time ago first company I started as perm for paid similar amount for me to the state to get me a work permit. And this was not out of CEO's pocket. Company of 15 it was.
    There is paying for it as an investment to the business and the tax situation. There is a difference.
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  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by northernladuk View Post
    There is paying for it as an investment to the business and the tax situation. There is a difference.
    As I said I agree. However I fail to see a difference. A co paying for a work permit allowing one to work in the UK.

    This WP brings a lot more benefit personally to this person (working in UK vs not allowed to work) than a citizenship over permanent residence (only difference is to be able to vote for parliament).

    Investment wise one's own co may invest in a citizenship of employee to get more contracts in the future.

  10. #30

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    But it's not wholly and exclusively as already pointed out.
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