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BolshieBastard
16th January 2015, 11:25
On Mars apparently. Who'd have thought?

NickFitz
16th January 2015, 11:46
:yay:

Shame they didn't find out how close it had come to success before Colin Pillinger died, though :frown

AtW
16th January 2015, 11:54
Beagle

DannyF1966
16th January 2015, 11:55
Makes you appreciate all the other projects that did succeed though, doesn't it? When we send out all these probes and robots to other planets, comets, moons etc, the ratio of successes to failures is actually amazingly high.

VectraMan
16th January 2015, 12:17
That is a shock.

As long as you didn't read the news on Tuesday.

BolshieBastard
16th January 2015, 12:27
That is a shock.

As long as you didn't read the news on Tuesday.

Except the news on Tuesday was an announcement about Beagle would be made Friday not that they had found it (although that was the speculation) or any other outcome.

Joking apart, it appears the 3rd solar panel didnt deploy for some reason, preventing 2 other panels and the transmission aerial from deploying.

Suspect is a puncturerd air cusshion on landing did some damage.

Did they announce all this on Tuesday? Dont think so!

VectraMan
16th January 2015, 12:37
Okay I'll let you off.

EternalOptimist
16th January 2015, 13:07
Except the news on Tuesday was an announcement about Beagle would be made Friday not that they had found it (although that was the speculation) or any other outcome.

Joking apart, it appears the 3rd solar panel didnt deploy for some reason, preventing 2 other panels and the transmission aerial from deploying.

Suspect is a puncturerd air cusshion on landing did some damage.

Did they announce all this on Tuesday? Dont think so!

interesting point about the panels not deploying, similar to the problems with the comet probe getting caught in the shade. Most probes have a nuclear power pack which seems to be a better bet, in terms of reliability

woohoo
16th January 2015, 13:13
interesting point about the panels not deploying, similar to the problems with the comet probe getting caught in the shade. Most probes have a nuclear power pack which seems to be a better bet, in terms of reliability

Would be a bit of a pisser if we did find intelligent life and we dropped a nuclear powered probe on them that then blew up and killed them all. I'm pretty certain that's what happened with the dinosaurs.

VectraMan
16th January 2015, 13:18
interesting point about the panels not deploying, similar to the problems with the comet probe getting caught in the shade. Most probes have a nuclear power pack which seems to be a better bet, in terms of reliability

Perhaps the nuclear option is more complicated and expensive, and (if everything works) unnecessary as solar panels can do the job.

barrydidit
16th January 2015, 13:41
Coal then. They should have sent Fred Dibnah with a traction engine - proper British exploration effort.

BolshieBastard
16th January 2015, 15:48
interesting point about the panels not deploying, similar to the problems with the comet probe getting caught in the shade. Most probes have a nuclear power pack which seems to be a better bet, in terms of reliability

They only tend to use the nuclear option for deep space missions where the sunlight isnt strong enough although Curiosity and other bigger probes on Mars are effectively nuclear powered.

They use Plutonium 238 which has a half life of about 90 years and doesnt radiate as deadly a radiation as 239. So, any probes which may come into contact with alien life will not cause an inter galactic war.

But bear in mind this mission was launched in 2002 / 3 as a last minute addition and on a very tight budget.

The solar panels would have provided sufficient power for Beagle if they'd all deployed. The reason why they didnt all deploy can only be speculated though.

GlenW
16th January 2015, 15:56
The reason why they didnt all deploy can only be speculated though.
The production of the hinges had been outsourced to Mumbai.