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vetran
12th March 2015, 15:16
“DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, said Death. JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH.”

Sadly Terry Pratchett has passed away.

eek
12th March 2015, 15:19
“DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, said Death. JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH.”

Sadly Terry Pratchett has passed away.

:frown an awfully nice bloke on the 3 occasions I met him..

d000hg
12th March 2015, 15:22
:(

Pondlife
12th March 2015, 15:27
:(

One of the most shoplifted authors of all time.

A great writer.

Unix
12th March 2015, 15:28
Never read any of his books, not my thing.

norrahe
12th March 2015, 15:28
:frown

RIP

SimonMac
12th March 2015, 15:31
“Despite rumor, Death isn't cruel--merely terribly, terribly good at his job"

MicrosoftBob
12th March 2015, 15:31
And a humanist to boot

Dark Black
12th March 2015, 15:33
ooook :(

RIP Terry

OwlHoot
12th March 2015, 15:34
Never read any of his books, not my thing.

WHS, although nothing against the guy

But I could have sworn he died years ago - Didn't he write Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy? :confused:

Dark Black
12th March 2015, 15:37
WHS, although nothing against the guy

But I could have sworn he died years ago - Didn't he write Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy? :confused:

You're thinking of Douglas Adams...

Unix
12th March 2015, 15:37
WHS, although nothing against the guy

But I could have sworn he died years ago - Didn't he write Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy? :confused:

No that was Douglas Adams, I read that book and loved it.

EternalOptimist
12th March 2015, 15:37
WHS, although nothing against the guy

But I could have sworn he died years ago - Didn't he write Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy? :confused:

no, that was some other bloke

SimonMac
12th March 2015, 15:37
WHS, although nothing against the guy

But I could have sworn he died years ago - Didn't he write Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy? :confused:

No that is Douglas Adams

VectraMan
12th March 2015, 15:39
Never read any of his books, not my thing.

How do you know?

Those first few were brilliant, but I did get a bit bored after a few books.

Unix
12th March 2015, 15:39
No that is Douglas Adams

Yes I concur it was Douglas Adams

Unix
12th March 2015, 15:40
How do you know?

Those first few were brilliant, but I did get a bit bored after a few books.

The cover

Coalman
12th March 2015, 15:41
The cover

Never judge a book by its cover...

Unix
12th March 2015, 15:42
Never judge a book by its cover...

How do I judge it then? Do I have to read every book that crosses my path?

EternalOptimist
12th March 2015, 15:42
Adams wrote Watership down, not HHGTTG

MyUserName
12th March 2015, 15:43
A loss to the world :-(

Funnily enough one of his Disc World characters is actually based on a guy I know. I didn't like his first few books but the others are great!

Unix
12th March 2015, 15:44
Adams wrote Watership down, not HHGTTG

No that was Charles Dickens

EternalOptimist
12th March 2015, 15:44
No that was Charles Dickens

oh. Is he dead as well then ?

DaveB
12th March 2015, 15:45
How do I judge it then? Do I have to read every book that crosses my path?

Nope. Just the first two pages. If you dont want to keep going after that then put it back down.

He (TP) did tail off in terms of his writing after the first few books. Guards Guards was the last one I really enjoyed. He had a tendancy to find a moral and then beat you over the head with it at every opportunity in his later books.

They were still worth reading though, there were always some gems hidden in the dirt. You just had to dig to find them.

d000hg
12th March 2015, 15:47
How do I judge it then? Do I have to read every book that crosses my path?Why are you so keen to judge everything?



I thought TP had controversially organised euthanasia in Switzerland or somewhere?

DannyF1966
12th March 2015, 15:51
oh. Is he dead as well then ?

Not yet. He writes the Christmas episodes of Doctor Who.

EternalOptimist
12th March 2015, 15:54
Not yet. He writes the Christmas episodes of Doctor Who.

ok.

btw, is it an Ide today ?
is today an ide

Zippy
12th March 2015, 15:56
Bugger, :shit: and f**etty f**k. They won't be dancing in the streets of Ankh Morpork tonight. And neither will I :(
I hope the Patrician gives him a good send off.

DaveB
12th March 2015, 15:57
ok.

btw, is it an Ide today ?
is today an ide

Not quite. 15th March is the equivalent of the Ides.

vetran
12th March 2015, 15:59
first got into him after reading 'good omens'.

My mother in law is going to be a bit miffed, she buys me his latest every year, and I promise not to read all boxing day.

Unix
12th March 2015, 16:00
So what were his books about?, I always had him as a poor mans Tolkien who just kept pumping out books.

DaveB
12th March 2015, 16:03
So what were his books about?, I always had him as a poor mans Tolkien who just kept pumping out books.

The Diverse and Humourous Adventures of the inhabitants of a world shaped like a dinner plate, where magic is real (and has a colour) balanced on the back of four elephants and all carried through space by a giant turtle of indeterminate gender.

woohoo
12th March 2015, 16:03
Real shame, 70 books is good going. Can't believe I read my first one at college, introduced to him by a friend. I think the bit that hooked me was about natural selection and the tortoise.

Two of my favorite others gone, Banks and Pratchett.

Unix
12th March 2015, 16:04
The Diverse and Humourous Adventures of the inhabitants of a world shaped like a dinner plate, where magic is real (and has a colour) balanced on the back of four elephants and all carried through space by a giant turtle of indeterminate gender.

ummm right.

vetran
12th March 2015, 16:04
So what were his books about?, I always had him as a poor mans Tolkien who just kept pumping out books.

varied but his main series was 'disk world' a quasi middle ages world 'dragging itself forward into the century of the Fruitbat' in a humorous manner.

Unix
12th March 2015, 16:06
varied but his main series was 'disk world' a quasi middle ages world 'dragging itself forward into the century of the Fruitbat' in a humorous manner.

mmmkay

VectraMan
12th March 2015, 16:06
Nope. Just the first two pages.

I remember somebody having The Colour of Magic at school and the first few pages was all it took to get everyone wanting to read it.

EternalOptimist
12th March 2015, 16:06
So what were his books about?, I always had him as a poor mans Tolkien who just kept pumping out books.

half satirical, half allegorical and half weird humour

based in a fantasy land where up was down half the time. i.e. people wanted to know the speed of dark
if light can have a speed, why not dark

Unix
12th March 2015, 16:07
half satirical, half allegorical and half weird humour

based in a fantasy land where up was down half the time. i.e. people wanted to know the speed of dark
if light can have a speed, why not dark

I was right then, sounds awful and not funny.

DaveB
12th March 2015, 16:08
ummm right.

search for The Colour of Magic on Amazon. They let you read the first few pages online for free. Have a read. If you dont like it, you dont like it.

woohoo
12th March 2015, 16:10
So what were his books about?, I always had him as a poor mans Tolkien who just kept pumping out books.

I don't think you can compare them really, different types of book, apart from the odd elf or dwarf. I don't think Pratchett wrote about hobbits or a ring. Less singing to. He also had an ape that was a librarian, Tolkien missed a trick there.

I can't be the only one that skipped the singing bits in Lord of the Rings.

vetran
12th March 2015, 16:10
https://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/1654.Terry_Pratchett

will give you a flavour, if you don't laugh then this is for you :


“If you have enough book space, I don't want to talk to you.”
― Terry Pratchett


“I'll be more enthusiastic about encouraging thinking outside the box when there's evidence of any thinking going on inside it.”
― Terry Pratchett

vetran
12th March 2015, 16:11
I don't think you can compare them really, different types of book, apart from the odd elf or dwarf. I don't think Pratchett wrote about hobbits or a ring. Less singing to. He also had an ape that was a librarian, Tolkien missed a trick there.

I can't be the only one that skipped the singing bits in Lord of the Rings.

yes but he did have 'Battle Bread'

d000hg
12th March 2015, 16:11
The closest I can think of is if Douglas Adams wrote fantasy. Nothing like Tolkein.

But you're just trolling anyway.

Unix
12th March 2015, 16:11
https://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/1654.Terry_Pratchett

will give you a flavour, if you don't laugh then this is for you :

Nah doesn't work for me.

Unix
12th March 2015, 16:12
The closest I can think of is if Douglas Adams wrote fantasy. Nothing like Tolkein.

But you're just trolling anyway.

So unless you love Terry Pratchett you are trolling???

Zippy
12th March 2015, 16:13
I was right then, sounds awful and not funny.

It's better than it sounds. He had a lovely way with language. He got it wrong a few times but was also great at poking fun at stereotypes.
Does anyone remember the burning wheel rolling out of the (horse-drawn) coach crash?

woohoo
12th March 2015, 16:18
yes but he did have 'Battle Bread'

Too true but wasn't the battle bread wielded rather than eaten?

Battle Bread, hovis have missed a trick there to.

cojak
12th March 2015, 16:19
No!!

Very upset to hear this. Terry Pratchett has been a constant companion through most of my adult life.

V sad :(

Halo Jones
12th March 2015, 16:24
I has the sad :frown

d000hg
12th March 2015, 16:26
So unless you love Terry Pratchett you are trolling???

No, you're trolling if you use an RIP thread to tell everyone (repeatedly) you never read any of his books but they sound rubbish.

vetran
12th March 2015, 16:26
Too true but wasn't the battle bread wielded rather than eaten?

Battle Bread, hovis have missed a trick there to.

Indeed it instantly took you back to every stale bit of bread you had ever handled.

Pondlife
12th March 2015, 16:32
Mort was the first one for me. A mate was reading it and when I asked what it was about he said "Death's apprentice. Him and Death have just gone for a curry."

NotAllThere
12th March 2015, 16:44
The closest I can think of is if Douglas Adams wrote fantasy. Nothing like Tolkein.

But you're just trolling anyway.And in a very warm room at that.

Reaper Man and Night Watch remain my favourites. "No one is actually dead until the ripples they cause in the world die away..."

alluvial
12th March 2015, 16:46
Such sad news. :frown

I started at the beginning and have read them all. Marvellous books with some brilliant one-liners. One of my favourites that I use all the time is that "One in a million chances happen nine times out of ten."

Pogle
12th March 2015, 16:57
I rather liked his books.
I wonder if Death came for him personally...

Yes and I realise I've spelt his name wrong !!

And there is already a thread about it - I need a lie down !

NickFitz
12th March 2015, 17:00
May I be the first to say KUATB (http://forums.contractoruk.com/general/105179-dont-think-dying-said-death.html) :D

Pondlife
12th March 2015, 17:02
I rather liked his books.
I wonder if Death came for him personally...

Yes and I realise I've spelt his name wrong !!

And there is already a thread about it - I need a lie down !

You seem to be taking the news particularly badly Pogle. :D

d000hg
12th March 2015, 17:07
I need to build up my collection of the 'classics' which is probably the first 20 or so... ideally paperbacks with the Josh Kirby covers.

Pogle
12th March 2015, 17:08
I am! I think a vodka and carrot juice - hold the carrot juice, is in order :o

NotAllThere
12th March 2015, 17:13
(Threads merged)

I rather liked his books.
I wonder if Death came for him personally...
It seems so:

" AT LAST, SIR TERRY, WE MUST WALK TOGETHER "
“Terry took Death’s arm and followed him through the doors and on to the black desert under the endless night.”
"The End".

administrator
12th March 2015, 17:21
Reading Truckers to my eldest at the minute. Sad news :frown

northernladuk
12th March 2015, 17:41
Very sad :(

EternalOptimist
12th March 2015, 17:42
wow.

when did this happen ?

I just heard that Wham have split up as well.

its a sad day

northernladuk
12th March 2015, 17:43
KUATB (http://forums.contractoruk.com/general/105179-dont-think-dying-said-death.html) you ******* moron....

OMG I fail so bad.

:igmc:

eek
12th March 2015, 17:49
Just blame your distress at the news...

vetran
12th March 2015, 17:52
KUATB (http://forums.contractoruk.com/general/105179-dont-think-dying-said-death.html) you ******* moron....

OMG I fail so bad.

:igmc:

Are you sure you are cut out to be a poster?

DodgyAgent
12th March 2015, 17:57
He will never be forgotten

:igmc:

mudskipper
12th March 2015, 17:58
wow.

when did this happen ?

I just heard that Wham have split up as well.

its a sad day

Wham! split up?:eek:?

fullyautomatix
12th March 2015, 18:03
When did this happen ? How come nobody on CUK has bothered to discuss this ?:mad

NickFitz
12th March 2015, 18:08
Did you try doing a search before posting? :rolleyes:

SueEllen
12th March 2015, 18:22
Very sad :(

Disagree.

When people have degenerative conditions dying while they still have some degree of dignity is the best.

vetran
12th March 2015, 18:24
Wham! split up?:eek:?

George is gay!

NotAllThere
12th March 2015, 20:49
Threads merged. Again.

TykeMerc
12th March 2015, 23:07
Very sad when I heard he'd passed, I have all of his Discworld books and a fair few of the other ones, had (and will have) many hours of fun reading them.

He created a lot of characters which are memorable, clever and engaging, a great talent in my eyes.

NotAllThere
13th March 2015, 07:20
http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/terry_pratchett.png

MyUserName
13th March 2015, 09:57
Very sad :(

Don't cry because it has finish, smile because it happened.

northernladuk
13th March 2015, 10:00
Disagree.

When people have degenerative conditions dying while they still have some degree of dignity is the best.

A slightly pedantic point but agree with what your saying in general.

vetran
13th March 2015, 10:23
A slightly pedantic point but agree with what your saying in general.

:spel

you are / you're not your

woohoo
13th March 2015, 10:57
:spel

you are / you're not your

I can't describe how much I loath people like you. You are not contributing anything, if you want someone to change their spelling PM them, but don't post a public comment. I know there are others out there that will agree with your pedantic, mithering, prostate examination of a comment, probably including NLUK (who once corrected my spelling) but I don't care, get a ******* life, do something else.

vetran
13th March 2015, 11:14
I can't describe how much I loath people like you. You are not contributing anything, if you want someone to change their spelling PM them, but don't post a public comment. I know there are others out there that will agree with your pedantic, mithering, prostate examination of a comment, probably including NLUK (who once corrected my spelling) but I don't care, get a ******* life, do something else.

you know it was to wind up NLUK?

woohoo
13th March 2015, 11:17
you know it was to wind up NLUK?

I feel bad now. I've crossed your name off my list.

Ticktock
13th March 2015, 11:45
I can't describe how much I loath people like you. You are not contributing anything, if you want someone to change their spelling PM them, but don't post a public comment. I know there are others out there that will agree with your pedantic, mithering, prostate examination of a comment, probably including NLUK (who once corrected my spelling) but I don't care, get a ******* life, do something else.

Loathe, not loath. Loath is the adjective.

woohoo
13th March 2015, 12:07
Loathe, not loath. Loath is the adjective.

If i had a list for being boring and predictable you would be on it.

Ticktock
13th March 2015, 12:10
If i had a list for being boring and predictable you would be on it.

Capitilise that i.

Predictable response, I know.

woohoo
13th March 2015, 12:14
Capitilise that i.

Predictable response, I know.

**** you and your capital i.

d000hg
13th March 2015, 12:24
Disagree.

When people have degenerative conditions dying while they still have some degree of dignity is the best.He hadn't even stopped writing, had he? I know he was writing as recently as last year. They weren't the same at all but then even without illness it's 20 years or more since the 'classics' were written and styles change.

I don't really know how this disease kills you, especially when you're still quite lucid. Anyone?

DaveB
13th March 2015, 13:07
He hadn't even stopped writing, had he? I know he was writing as recently as last year. They weren't the same at all but then even without illness it's 20 years or more since the 'classics' were written and styles change.

I don't really know how this disease kills you, especially when you're still quite lucid. Anyone?

I doesnt while you are still reasonably with it. Eventually it gets to the point that you just stop. You brain function drops so far that eventually basic stuff like breathing stops. In the later stages you also become prone to other issues like blood clots due to lack of movement, malnourishment due to inability to eat etc etc.

There were no real details given on his condition recently so it's hard to say how bad a state he was in. It is worth noting though that he was a strong proponent of the right to die and had very definate ideas about how he wanted to go.

cojak
13th March 2015, 13:07
I found this - a smashing way to see his Discworld books.

http://www.lspace.org/books/reading-order-guides/the-discworld-reading-order-guide-20.jpg

cojak
13th March 2015, 13:14
I doesnt while you are still reasonably with it. Eventually it gets to the point that you just stop. You brain function drops so far that eventually basic stuff like breathing stops. In the later stages you also become prone to other issues like blood clots due to lack of movement, malnourishment due to inability to eat etc etc.

There were no real details given on his condition recently so it's hard to say how bad a state he was in. It is worth noting though that he was a strong proponent of the right to die and had very definate ideas about how he wanted to go.

In 2012 he presented a lecture "Shaking Hands with Death", about assisted death. It was read by Tony Robinson, I guess that he was unable to read by then.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90b1MBwnEHM

LisaContractorUmbrella
13th March 2015, 13:32
Quote from Reaper Man: "No one is actually dead until the ripples they cause in the world die away" singularly appropriate I thought. Love his books - one of the few writers that could make me laugh out loud RIP :frown

d000hg
13th March 2015, 13:53
I found this - a smashing way to see his Discworld books.

http://www.lspace.org/books/reading-order-guides/the-discworld-reading-order-guide-20.jpg



Where is Raising Steam? I couldn't see it there.

NotAllThere
13th March 2015, 15:59
Snuff follows Thud
Raising Steam follows Making Money

d000hg
13th March 2015, 16:02
I find it odd a few are classed as "young adult" because I always thought that the main discworld books were aimed at that demographic (15-25) and the younger ones were childrens' books.

SpontaneousOrder
13th March 2015, 16:13
I find it odd a few are classed as "young adult" because I always thought that the main discworld books were aimed at that demographic (15-25) and the younger ones were childrens' books.

The early ones, at least, were quite rude.

TykeMerc
13th March 2015, 16:25
I think you will find that by "young adult" they mean early teens onwards, basically aimed at kids.

Quite a lot of his books deal with adult matters and make use of grown up humour that might well be a challenge to kids.

If it turns out that he took an assisted route to the end then I'm certainly not going to condemn his choice, I do believe that people should have the option to decide their own fate and if they've no quality of life or prospect of it then they should have options available. Not that it makes his loss less sad to me as I've had so much enjoyment reading his books.

d000hg
13th March 2015, 16:35
The early ones, at least, were quite rude.
I think you will find that by "young adult" they mean early teens onwards, basically aimed at kids.

Quite a lot of his books deal with adult matters and make use of grown up humour that might well be a challenge to kids.They never struck me that way - I was in my early/mid teens as many of the classic discworld books came out, and remember eagerly waiting the school library to get each new book (which luckily happened very often).

Perhaps not for younger kids but I thought 13-18 was the core Discworld reading demographic! But then I was a pretty avid reader so maybe not typical.

SpontaneousOrder
13th March 2015, 16:53
They never struck me that way - I was in my early/mid teens as many of the classic discworld books came out, and remember eagerly waiting the school library to get each new book (which luckily happened very often).

Perhaps not for younger kids but I thought 13-18 was the core Discworld reading demographic! But then I was a pretty avid reader so maybe not typical.

It's not mega rude, but for kids it'd probably be sometimes inappropriate. It's subtle though so it's go right over the head's of the small ones.

The prologue of the first book sets the tone :grin:




...

There was, for example, the theory that A'Tuin had come from nowhere and would continue at a uniform crawl, or steady gait, into nowhere, for all time. This theory was popular among academics.
An alternative, favoured by those of a religious persuasion, was that A'Tuin was crawling from the Birthplace to the Time of Mating, as were all the stars in the sky which were, obviously, also carried by giant turtles. When they arrived they would briefly and passionately mate, for the first and only time, and from that fiery union new turtles would be born to carry a new pattern of worlds. This was known as the Big Bang hypothesis."

TykeMerc
13th March 2015, 17:04
They never struck me that way - I was in my early/mid teens as many of the classic discworld books came out, and remember eagerly waiting the school library to get each new book (which luckily happened very often).

Perhaps not for younger kids but I thought 13-18 was the core Discworld reading demographic! But then I was a pretty avid reader so maybe not typical.

I've read them all as an adult and a parent so apart from the ones that were obviously written for kids I've viewed them as intended for an adult market. I assumed Discworld core target was mid-late teens onwards, just goes to show how relevant context is.

That being said I read many books aimed clearly at adults (no not the mucky type ones, ok well a few of those too) as a child and teenager, so it's hardly a fixed thing, but there are certainly subtleties that need the adult mind to spot and his writing had no shortage of those which was part of his appeal and his talent.

NickFitz
13th March 2015, 19:07
If it turns out that he took an assisted route to the end then I'm certainly not going to condemn his choice, I do believe that people should have the option to decide their own fate and if they've no quality of life or prospect of it then they should have options available. Not that it makes his loss less sad to me as I've had so much enjoyment reading his books.

His family have stated that he didn't. He just died of his condition.

DaveB
13th March 2015, 21:53
Never mind bringing back the knob Clarkson, this is a petition worth signing.

https://www.change.org/p/death-bring-back-terry-pratchett

NickFitz
13th March 2015, 22:15
Never mind bringing back the knob Clarkson, this is a petition worth signing.

https://www.change.org/p/death-bring-back-terry-pratchett

Love the comment on there, "Death: are you sure you're ready to meet your maker?" :laugh

darmstadt
13th March 2015, 23:19
Very sad, an author in the vein of other great British authors such as Tom Sharpe who have ability to make you think yet still laugh out loud. I remember him embracing the Internet some years ago vie Usenet and the alt.fan.pratchett (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/alt.fan.pratchett) group. He'll be sorely missed but has left a great legacy.

Zero Liability
13th March 2015, 23:51
Not read anything by him but he seems like he was a genuinely lovely person. Although I do intend to read the Discworld novels at some point.

mudskipper
14th March 2015, 12:32
Not read anything by him but he seems like he was a genuinely lovely person. Although I do intend to read the Discworld novels at some point.

Me neither, but always meant to.

Any recommendations on where to start?

TykeMerc
14th March 2015, 13:43
I found this - a smashing way to see his Discworld books.

http://www.lspace.org/books/reading-order-guides/the-discworld-reading-order-guide-20.jpg

Mudskipper, start with the Rincewind books, the Colour of Magic was the first of his Discworld ones.

They do have a rough timeline as per the graphic, but don't get too bothered by that. You don't have to have read the previous ones to enjoy the others, most are free standing stories but using a common world and some shared characters.

mudskipper
14th March 2015, 13:46
Mudskipper, start with the Rincewind books, the Colour of Magic was the first of his Discworld ones.

They do have a rough timeline as per the graphic, but don't get too bothered by that. You don't have to have read the previous ones to enjoy the others, most are free standing stories but using a common world and some shared characters.

Ta, will download now :)

Zero Liability
14th March 2015, 14:48
Me neither, but always meant to.

Any recommendations on where to start?

Guess we know now. :D

TheLordDave
14th March 2015, 21:47
I tried to read one of the disc world books many years ago, just couldn't get into it. Might have to give it another go on holidays this year.

cojak
15th March 2015, 07:06
I tried to read one of the disc world books many years ago, just couldn't get into it. Might have to give it another go on holidays this year.

Which one was it? There are one or two that I won't read that often.

OwlHoot
15th March 2015, 08:33
Sounds like he was a nice guy, and it's a great shame he died so young, but those novels look a right nonsensical mish mash, and I'm afraid I don't plan on reading any.

NotAllThere
15th March 2015, 09:23
...but those novels look a right nonsensical mish mash...I think you're confusing him with J.K.Rowling. Pratchett novels - especially the later ones - have a well developed, consistent* sense of place.

I can't find the quote, but he said something like that his novels cover serious topics such as slavery, freedom of the press, religion etc. "but you include one lousy dragon and suddenly you're a fantasy writer".

Even my wife enjoys his better books - and she can't stand fantasy novels usually. There's been a couple (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hogfather-DVD-David-Jason/dp/B000V7ZMK0/ref=sr_1_1?s=dvd&ie=UTF8&qid=1426411533&sr=1-1&keywords=the+hogfather) of decent (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Going-Postal-DVD-David-Suchet/dp/B003IPC3JU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1426411486&sr=8-1&keywords=going+postal) tv-movies made.

*depending on the particular trouser leg of time

cojak
15th March 2015, 10:35
Redditors are making sure that TP's name lives on forever (http://i100.independent.co.uk/article/redditors-are-making-sure-terry-pratchetts-name-lives-on-forever--lJjYpijRag)

http://www.reddit.com/r/discworld/comments/2ysv26/sir_terry_has_gone_for_the_long_walk_across_the/cpcmru1

GNU Terry Pratchett : discworld (http://www.reddit.com/r/discworld/comments/2yt9j6/gnu_terry_pratchett/)

NotAllThere
15th March 2015, 19:39
You think Administrator will do the necessary for every CUK page served?

administrator
15th March 2015, 20:36
http://forums.contractoruk.com/general/105179-dont-think-dying-said-death-3.html

GET /general/105179-dont-think-dying-said-death-3.html HTTP/1.1
Host: forums.contractoruk.com
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:36.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/36.0
Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8
Accept-Language: en-US,en;q=0.5
Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate
Referer: http://forums.contractoruk.com/general/105179-dont-think-dying-said-death-2.html
Connection: keep-alive
Cache-Control: max-age=0

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Sun, 15 Mar 2015 20:34:36 GMT
Server: Apache/2.2.14 (Ubuntu)
X-Powered-By: PHP/5.3.2-1ubuntu4.28
Expires: 0
Cache-Control: private, post-check=0, pre-check=0, max-age=0
Pragma: no-cache
Content-Encoding: gzip
Content-Length: 53049
X-Clacks-Overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett
Keep-Alive: timeout=2, max=100
Connection: Keep-Alive
Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1

vetran
16th March 2015, 09:39
Sounds like he was a nice guy, and it's a great shame he died so young, but those novels look a right nonsensical mish mash, and I'm afraid I don't plan on reading any.

entirely your loss.

zeitghost
16th March 2015, 09:43
I read one.

Don't think it was a discworld one though.

Someone had stolen the core of a nuclear reactor in it.

jonskids
16th March 2015, 18:04
Inn-Sewer-Ants: the translation of an Agatean concept brought to Ankh-Morpork by Twoflower.

The idea was that a financial institution, upon payment of a yearly "premium", would guarantee reimbursement of loss of property due to fire or other disaster.

This must have worked well in the Aurient, but Morporkians soon found the opportunity to reap windfall profits of thousands of percent irresistible.

The ensuing chain of events included the Great Fire of Ankh-Morpork, the formation of the Firefighters' Guild, and Charcoal Wednesday. Blown by the up-draft, the scorched parchment of the Inn-sewer-ants polly-sea floated across the Disc.

It came down on the Brown Islands where the natives laughingly worshiped it as a god. For the next seven years they received good rainfall and bumper harvests of crops.

A research team of UU wizards later dispatched to study this event finally concluded; 'it only goes to show'.