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TheLordDave
18th June 2015, 19:44
Long story short, woman who lives next door moved out. House was empty for a year, then moved her heavily mentally disabled brother in.

He now lives their alone with his stupid yappy dog.

He is an utter pain in the arse. They have a metal spiral staircase and he bangs up and down it the noise vibrating through our house, waking the baby up every time.

He has an industrial spec petrol strimmer which he uses to strim his 1m squared patch of lawn every day, sometimes twice a day. But somehow requires a cleaning woman to hoover??

The dog is locked out for hours on end barking at all times of the day and night and happily tries to bite mine and the other neighbours dogs under the fence.

He also enjoys standing in his bedroom window (which overlooks our garden) in his pants watching us, or goes to the top of his garden to have a nose through our bedroom window. Leading to me putting up a fence well over the legal max (currently about 12 foot, but this is still too low due to the slope of the gardens)

He has also been 'renovating' his house and garden for about 18 months now.

The parents pick him up every night for tea, then drop him off at 9. The same every night, door slams,let the dog out, dog starts barking, bangs up the stairs and wakes up our 10 month old.

Anyone had anything similar?

I'm wondering if there is anyone we can contact (council, social services ect)? As not only is he being a bloody nuisance, I have seen him fall while using his petrol strimmer and one day he is doing to seriously damage himself.

As he lives alone it is impossible to talk to him as if you knock the door to get him to turn down the music he likes to put on single track repeat for hours ( you'll never walk alone
, so he is a bloody Liverpool fan too!) he turns the lights off and hides.

Short of arranging some sort of 'accident' I am seriously at my wits end with this.

mudskipper
18th June 2015, 19:47
Polite word with the parents? Remember it's tough on them though, and they've probably had years of intolerant people complaining, so do it sympathetically and ask if there's anything they can suggest.

eek
18th June 2015, 19:49
What MS said first. If that gets no where then its

https://www.gov.uk/report-noise-pollution-to-council leading eventually to court and an ASBO....

darmstadt
18th June 2015, 19:51
Remember to put a mask on next time you knock on his front door, in fact anyone who has trouble with neighbours, get a scary mask (http://www.trickortreatstudios.com/buy_scary_halloween_masks_full.html) and bang on their window...

http://www.trickortreatstudios.com/images/big/lightboxshock1.jpg

stek
18th June 2015, 19:52
I didn't know Suity had moved....

FatLazyContractor
18th June 2015, 19:53
, so he is a bloody Liverpool fan too

I had my sympathy for him till I read this. :facepalm:

TheLordDave
18th June 2015, 19:59
Polite word with the parents? Remember it's tough on them though, and they've probably had years of intolerant people complaining, so do it sympathetically and ask if there's anything they can suggest.

That would be my first port of call but they literally drop him on the street and pick him up on the street, which is hidden by my hedge, they pretty much never come to the house when I'm there.

They go out of their way to avoid us and the other neighbours. Maybe I need to wait outside at 9 and catch them at drop off.

TheLordDave
18th June 2015, 19:59
Remember to put a mask on next time you knock on his front door, in fact anyone who has trouble with neighbours, get a scary mask (http://www.trickortreatstudios.com/buy_scary_halloween_masks_full.html) and bang on their window...

http://www.trickortreatstudios.com/images/big/lightboxshock1.jpg

That might be the best idea yet!

MarillionFan
18th June 2015, 21:04
How about some piped noises from your house to his. Perhaps whispering his name, throwing your voice his when he's around

Dave, oh dave!
Daaaaaveeee I can see you, we can all see you!!
Dave! DAVE! In the bathroom, we can see you!
Dave! DAVE! When you're sleeping, we're watching you!!
We can hear you breathe!......
Kill your dog Dave, Dave! He's watching you!

Social services will do the rest

SueEllen
18th June 2015, 21:22
Serious note the guy isn't a physical risk to your child so the authorities will do SFA. As he is considered a "vulnerable person" they will turn a blind eye to his activities. (I've dealt with that.)

Therefore you need to think of activities which you can suggest to his parents which will limit his behaviour.

For example saying the dog sounds distressed in the garden and should be taken for a 3 hour walk everyday like a good dog owner (hopefully the guy has a concept of time or can understand a watch) will likely work better, than simply saying stop the damn dog barking.

If he does take the dog on long walks both he and the dog will be tired and less annoying. If that doesn't work kidnap and dump the nasty thing, making sure it looks like it escaped through the fence. (OK didn't do that a neighbour's dog but looking tearful about the "distressed" dog being left alone worked, and the dog actually now likes me.)

Likewise getting him to grow plants even if he kills them, and saying his garden is "wonderful" etc and you like what he has done when you see him to stop him strimming will be more constructive than telling him to stop strimming straight. Or work out what manual gardening tool is quite cool to use which he can injury himself with and buy it for him as a present.....

MarillionFan
18th June 2015, 21:24
Serious note the guy isn't a physical risk to your child so the authorities will do SFA. As he is considered a "vulnerable person" they will turn a blind eye to his activities. (I've dealt with that.)

Therefore you need to think of activities which you can suggest to his parents which will limit his behaviour.

For example saying the dog sounds distressed in the garden and should be taken for a 3 hour walk everyday like a good dog owner (hopefully the guy has a concept of time or can understand a watch) will likely work better, than simply saying stop the damn dog barking.

If he does take the dog on long walks both he and the dog will be tired and less annoying. If that doesn't work kidnap and dump the nasty thing, making sure it looks like it escaped through the fence. (OK didn't do that a neighbour's dog but looking tearful about the "distressed" dog being left alone worked, and the dog actually now likes me.)

Likewise getting him to grow plants even if he kills them, and saying his garden is "wonderful" etc and you like what he has done when you see him to stop him strimming will be more constructive than telling him to stop strimming straight. Or work out what manual gardening tool is quite cool to use which he can injury himself with and buy it for him as a present.....

You could take this approach as well, if you don't want to try and push him over the mental edge.

mudskipper
18th June 2015, 21:38
You could try befriending and supporting him a bit. Just a thought. :rolleyes:

greenlake
18th June 2015, 21:49
Take off and nuke the entire site from orbit. It's the only way to be sure.

http://i.imgur.com/dlCSRiP.gif

Snarf
19th June 2015, 07:25
You could try befriending and supporting him a bit. Just a thought. :rolleyes:

Talking? To a neighbour? In person?
Are you mad? :happy

Seriously though as a parent of a disabled child who is likely to be in a similar situation in the future (living alone but with significant support), I would hope that this would be the approach taken.. Or speaking to the parents..

Some of the suggestions on here are ******** ridiculous, I know they were meant as jokes, but seriously... Kidnap a disabled guys dog... Yeah that's a GREAT idea and would have absolutely no negative consequences at all.

Pogle
19th June 2015, 07:37
FFS this place gets more like Mumsnet every day

NotAllThere
19th June 2015, 07:56
I like the mix of compassion and downright viciousness - often in the same post.

Pondlife
19th June 2015, 08:14
You could try befriending and supporting him a bit. Just a thought. :rolleyes:

Steady on! :eek:

BrilloPad
19th June 2015, 08:15
FFS this place gets more like Mumsnet every day

I haven't seen anything on centreparcs sexual activities. Or Penis Beaker. Yet...

BrilloPad
19th June 2015, 08:19
Get in Tony Blair as a peace envoy.

d000hg
19th June 2015, 08:21
That would be my first port of call but they literally drop him on the street and pick him up on the street, which is hidden by my hedge, they pretty much never come to the house when I'm there.

They go out of their way to avoid us and the other neighbours. Maybe I need to wait outside at 9 and catch them at drop off.Maybe they are embarrassed and/or have only had bad experiences with neighbours before.

It's worth a try to talk with them but easier if you lay some groundwork of politeness first.

GlenW
19th June 2015, 08:25
Get in Tony Blair as a peace envoy.
Then, if it goes totally tits up, Kate Adie.

unixman
19th June 2015, 08:25
Somehow doubt the veracity of OP, but ploughing on... obviously don't do anything illegal, like stealing dogs etc. Pick the worst two habits (barking dog, strimmer) and talk to his parents about it. Likely they have seen his behaviour patterns over decades so will understand, but be nice about it and don't just hand them a long list of problems with their son. They might be able to make helpful arrangements, arrange a carer to pop in daily, whatever.

They probably care about the lad and want him to fit in, so try and make friends with them.

BrilloPad
19th June 2015, 08:32
Talking? To a neighbour? In person?
Are you mad? :happy

Seriously though as a parent of a disabled child who is likely to be in a similar situation in the future (living alone but with significant support), I would hope that this would be the approach taken.. Or speaking to the parents..

Some of the suggestions on here are ******** ridiculous, I know they were meant as jokes, but seriously... Kidnap a disabled guys dog... Yeah that's a GREAT idea and would have absolutely no negative consequences at all.

I hope that when your child gets older you speak to their neighbours to avoid this sort of situation.

Ideally the parents will be spoken to. But people don't behave perfectly. If you are unlucky your child will have a neighbour with intolerable stresses.

I really feel for your situation by the way. I have autistic children. Good luck!

tarbera
19th June 2015, 08:50
Scratch his car door

fullyautomatix
19th June 2015, 13:46
How close is your house to his that you can hear disturbance in his house so much as to wake your kid up ?? Is it a flat or something ? I doubt a proper detached house ( you are living in a detached house , right ? ) will have so many issues with neighbours etc. In fact, I would prefer an acre of space between me and any neighbours.

fullyautomatix
19th June 2015, 13:54
FFS this place gets more like Mumsnet every day


It has never been the same ever since the Mumsnet invasion years ago. Its almost as if everybody acquired an injection of female hormones.

Support Monkey
19th June 2015, 14:19
From previous experience you won't win, you will always be on the lookout for issues and animosity will grow between both parties

The dog is simple, keep a record of all the times it barks over the period of a couple of weeks then pass this to the council dog warden, it's a thousand pound fine for allowing a dog to bark and cause a noise nuisance

The neighbour you need to go round and discuss it with them try and keep It amicable explain what your issues are ask him directly to tone it down, keep a record of all conversations and instances of when the issues occur, if the behaviour continues then report him to your local authority, even if the property is privately owned they can serve a nuisance abatement notice

Or the best options is to just move, I had 5 years of hassle with my neighbour tried all the reasonable avenues nothing worked so we sold up, and even though I thought they would be happy to see the back of us they even tried to put a mockers on that

TheLordDave
19th June 2015, 19:49
How close is your house to his that you can hear disturbance in his house so much as to wake your kid up ?? Is it a flat or something ? I doubt a proper detached house ( you are living in a detached house , right ? ) will have so many issues with neighbours etc. In fact, I would prefer an acre of space between me and any neighbours.

Sadly no, it's an 80's end terrace. If I could get a sodding mortgage I would sell up in a heartbeat.

OwlHoot
20th June 2015, 13:44
Maybe you could buy him some easy-to-use computer game console, and a suitable game, "for his birthday"

If he is obsessive about strimming the lawn, perhaps he would be equally inclined to spend all day on the console.

as long as he didn't plug it into a stereo system, so you would have do endure 100 dB squawks and explosions all day!

SueEllen
20th June 2015, 16:19
Maybe you could buy him some easy-to-use computer game console, and a suitable game, "for his birthday"

If he is obsessive about strimming the lawn, perhaps he would be equally inclined to spend all day on the console.

as long as he didn't plug it into a stereo system, so you would have do endure 100 dB squawks and explosions all day!

Buy him some good looking headphones as well. Then show him how to use them......