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SimonMac
29th June 2015, 09:50
Even though you are agnostic, but because it has the best reputation of local schools?

MarillionFan
29th June 2015, 09:51
Even though you are agnostic, but because it has the best reputation of local schools?

Is Faith Brown doing schools now then?

shaunbhoy
29th June 2015, 09:52
Even though you are agnostic, but because it has the best reputation of local schools?

Of course. No brainer.

Next.....

SpontaneousOrder
29th June 2015, 09:54
Even though you are agnostic, but because it has the best reputation of local schools?

Agnosticism is a pussy stance to take, so sure - why not.

d000hg
29th June 2015, 09:58
There are faith schools and Faith schools - some are really just like the quintessential English school experience many of us grew up in, with "English Christianity", while others are much more active. For instance it's not a given that the teachers at a faith school adhere to that faith - RC schools want people who are 'officially' catholic but that doesn't really mean much.

So, yes, but check the school out and ask them about the issue first if it's a potential problem.

mudskipper
29th June 2015, 10:06
I did. It didn't seem much more 'religious' than non-faith schools. I suspect RC may be more so.

CloudWalker
29th June 2015, 10:06
:eyes what faith? Christian, Islam , Jedi ? ? ?

SimonMac
29th June 2015, 10:06
There are faith schools and Faith schools - some are really just like the quintessential English school experience many of us grew up in, with "English Christianity", while others are much more active. For instance it's not a given that the teachers at a faith school adhere to that faith - RC schools want people who are 'officially' catholic but that doesn't really mean much.

So, yes, but check the school out and ask them about the issue first if it's a potential problem.

Home page of the website has a big splash on celbrating "first communion", not sure it would go well with my Bowler hat and orange sash :laugh

But they are rated as Outstanding with OFSTED

MarillionFan
29th June 2015, 10:07
:eyes what faith? Christian, Islam , Jedi ? ? ?

I'd send my kids to a Jedi School. Pity any child called Luke though.

SimonMac
29th June 2015, 10:08
:eyes what faith? Christian, Islam , Jedi ? ? ?

Full blown Rice Krispie

GlenW
29th June 2015, 10:08
Yes I would, but I'd feel like a hypocrite. We have been lucky and didn't need to, as our local non-faith schools have all been very good.

SimonMac
29th June 2015, 10:09
I'd send my kids to a Jedi School. Pity any child called Luke though.

Its ok, you're not his father anyway

shaunbhoy
29th June 2015, 10:09
Home page of the website has a big splash on celbrating "first communion", not sure it would go well with my Bowler hat and orange sash :laugh

But they are rated as Outstanding with OFSTED

Things are a lot different now. In the old days that may have been frowned upon. Nowadays you'd be invited along on Sports Day in full regalia to act as a kind of Pinata Donkey for the juniors! All part of building bridges. :wink

eek
29th June 2015, 10:12
Home page of the website has a big splash on celbrating "first communion", not sure it would go well with my Bowler hat and orange sash :laugh

But they are rated as Outstanding with OFSTED

So you are looking at primary schools then (I'm guessing key stage 2).. One issue will be being the only non catholic child as the entire year is devoted in part to that first communion.

The real question is how good are your local secondary schools. Remember I spent years ensuring that our local cofe church school had a significantly good relationship with the nationally outstanding Catholic Secondary school to get the eek jrs in.

That relationship has now fallen about within a year of me leaving...

vetran
29th June 2015, 10:14
Its ok, you're not his father anyway

POTD!

unixman
29th June 2015, 10:22
The question is, would the school accept your child if you have no interest in the relevant faith. The answer is no, they would not.

eek
29th June 2015, 10:26
The question is, would the school accept your child if you have no interest in the relevant faith. The answer is no, they would not.

Admission criteria isn't based on interest. Its based on sibling links, religion and distance...

TheFaQQer
29th June 2015, 10:27
I'd send my child to the school that they were most comfortable with, which would hopefully also be the one where I thought that they would do best.

Which is the approach we have adopted with my elder daughter - on paper there are better schools nearby, but she liked the one that she is going to (which on paper is the worst one in the area) best. She was comfortable there, the staff were more welcoming there, and it's got significantly smaller class sizes than any of the others.

We considered the Catholic school, even though we aren't Catholic, but because of that she wouldn't have got in there without us needing to go to appeal - but she didn't like it as much and nor did we.

BrilloPad
29th June 2015, 10:30
I joined the Catholic church to get my elder kids into the local school.

Interestingly the best secondary schools in Wales are Welsh speaking. And I would rather move to England than put baby bp through that!

TheFaQQer
29th June 2015, 10:31
We considered the Catholic school, even though we aren't Catholic, but because of that she wouldn't have got in there without us needing to go to appeal - but she didn't like it as much and nor did we.

When we did the open days, we discussed with the RE staff at the Catholic school about whether there would be any issues - my wife is atheist rather than agnostic, whereas I am not and nor are the children (strictly speaking).

They were very welcoming and said that they'd like more children from backgrounds like that because then they have a bit more of a mix of beliefs in the class.

oscarose
29th June 2015, 10:40
Yes, as long as there is no other 'funny business' going off and the lessons don't all revolve around God. Hopefully, Buddha gets a mention too.

:o

Dallas
29th June 2015, 10:45
Brother and I went from Private Catholic Primary to a CofE Secondary.

Going into secondary school we were about 3 years ahead, starting languages having those posh calculators at 7.

unixman
29th June 2015, 10:49
Admission criteria isn't based on interest. Its based on sibling links, religion and distance...

Yes. I rolled up sibling links, religion and distance and other factors into "interest".

original PM
29th June 2015, 10:51
I went to a catholic school.

They held about 2 masses a year in school -but your parents could opt you out if they wished

The was limited religious influence on lessons with the exception of RE - which was incredible biased towards RC surprisingly enough - e.g. we spent 30 minutes on why abortion is acceptable and 3 weeks on why it is not.

But if it is the best school in the area then go for it - mostly they just get taught decent Christian values.

d000hg
29th June 2015, 10:58
The question is, would the school accept your child if you have no interest in the relevant faith. The answer is no, they would not.


Admission criteria isn't based on interest. Its based on sibling links, religion and distance...If they have competition for places then they may ask you more than just "are you a Catholic", you get parents start going to church so they can get their kids into their preferred school, I think?

vwdan
29th June 2015, 11:21
Yes, without a shadow of a doubt. I'm downright atheist, but I used to work for an educational services company and spent 5 years dealing with schools. There's no doubt in my mind that, in general, the faith schools were friendlier, calmer and generally seemed to have a better class of education.

Plus, I went to a proper Catholic school and it never really bothered me. The occasional mass and having to do the sign of the cross etc and that was that. As it happened, I absolutely hated my school - but I don't think I'd have got on with any school.

BrilloPad
29th June 2015, 11:26
Yes, as long as there is no other 'funny business' going off and the lessons don't all revolve around God. Hopefully, Buddha gets a mention too.

:o

At my kids Catholic school, the only difference is that RE is mandatory to GCSE.

They are strict. Most of the best performing schools are.

Who is this Buddha guy? Is he another of these so called "Scientists" that guess at what is happening and present it as fact?

mudskipper
29th June 2015, 11:41
Youngest went to a C of E primary.

They had a couple of services a year at the local church, and Christmas etc had the religious story. I don't think he was ever told "This is what is true", more that "This is what our belief is". RC may vary.

He seems to get more religion at his secondary which is not a faith school, but has Christian clubs (including optional confirmation classes), a chapel onsite which they attend weekly, as well as a very high proportion of Asian kids (who I'm guessing mostly aren't Christian). He tells me that no-one opts out of the services, so I guess it's not seen as a problem. So a non-faith school doesn't necessarily mean no religion.

meridian
29th June 2015, 11:42
In our experience of looking at schools, there is a big difference between "satisfactory" and "outstanding", so even as an atheist we would lean towards the faith school, but not before additional research. What proportion of their day is spent on RE? For RC, what proportion of Y1/2 is spent memorising for communion? What's the curriculum like for science?

eek
29th June 2015, 11:46
At my kids Catholic school, the only difference is that RE is mandatory to GCSE.

They are strict. Most of the best performing schools are.



+1. Same with us. That means that while its suitable for many children it may not be suitable for all. Our neighbours are sending their children to the other good local school. Which is a shame for the boy as he really would be better looked after at the smaller more personal but not quite as good* nearest secondary.

* It used to be awful but is actually quite good. Downside is the really bright children don't go there as their parents play the games required to get them into the schools that have been known to be good for decades..

TheFaQQer
29th June 2015, 12:30
In our experience of looking at schools, there is a big difference between "satisfactory" and "outstanding"

"Satisfactory" doesn't exist as a classification any more, it'e "Requires Improvement". Then there's "Good" and then "Outstanding", so there must be a big difference between the first and third grading in the system.

Every school needs to be good. To be good, the school must be better than the average.

And just because a school is classed as outstanding when OFSTED come in, that doesn't mean that they stay that way - my nephew's school went from Outstanding to Inadequate in the space of 18 months.

oscarose
29th June 2015, 12:31
Who is this Buddha guy? Is he another of these so called "Scientists" that guess at what is happening and present it as fact?

I believe he was a wise man who sat under a tree for a few years to clear his troubled mind. Following such a period of enlightenment, he then kindly passed on wisdom gained to punters and regular folk of the era.

Hope that helps?

:o

MyUserName
29th June 2015, 12:38
I am an atheist but I sent mine to a faith preschool. Daughter went to a standard primary school afterwards but she has specified special needs which influenced our decision there. When she goes to secondary school we intend sending her to the faith school again because it gets far better than average results. Her brother might well just stay in the faith school until he leaves school completely..

Even if she ends up being a Christian it does not really mean anything. Christians are an incredibly diverse bunch even within our church (some believe in sex before marriage, some don't, some believe in the death penalty and some don't etc.) that it is quite possible to end up a normal well rounded person even if you believe you can telepathically communicate in all powerful, super natural, creature.

BrilloPad
29th June 2015, 13:18
Every school needs to be good. To be good, the school must be better than the average.

:confused: How can every school be better than average?


I believe he was a wise man who sat under a tree for a few years to clear his troubled mind.

So Buddha was actually Isaac Newton? Then I withdraw my criticism. Newton was amazing - I always loved his solution to the Brachistochrone.

TheFaQQer
29th June 2015, 13:24
:confused: How can every school be better than average?

By getting better all the time.

This is the logic of the former education secretary, now justice secretary. But Nicky Morgan echoed the sentiment - all schools should be good. Good is better than average.


Q98 Chair: One is: if "good" requires pupil performance to exceed the national average, and if all schools must be good, how is this mathematically possible?

Michael Gove: By getting better all the time.

Q99 Chair: So it is possible, is it?

Michael Gove: It is possible to get better all the time.

Q100 Chair: Were you better at literacy than numeracy, Secretary of State?

Michael Gove: I cannot remember.

(linky (http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201012/cmselect/cmeduc/uc1786-i/uc178601.htm))

BrilloPad
29th June 2015, 13:27
By getting better all the time.

This is the logic of the former education secretary, now justice secretary. But Nicky Morgan echoed the sentiment - all schools should be good. Good is better than average.



(linky (http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201012/cmselect/cmeduc/uc1786-i/uc178601.htm))

So like GCSE and A levels then? We have no idea how well anyone is doing?

In my day only the top 10% got an "A". I did get lots of "A"s - it took of slate and chalk to get there.

oscarose
29th June 2015, 13:51
So Buddha was actually Isaac Newton?

That's quite possible I think. Did he spend many years sitting under trees and relaxing?

:o

d000hg
29th June 2015, 13:53
All schools should aspire to be above average, but clearly that's a moving target :)

TheFaQQer
29th June 2015, 14:36
All schools should aspire to be above average, but clearly that's a moving target :)

Aspiration is one thing. Being told that all schools must be better than average is impossible.

MicrosoftBob
29th June 2015, 14:43
Aspiration is one thing. Being told that all schools must be better than average is impossible.

Unless they deem them all to be above average because that requires no semblance of reality

vetran
29th June 2015, 15:29
Aspiration is one thing. Being told that all schools must be better than average is impossible.

we could of course make sure all schools are below acceptable and send the leaders children to paid schools. Better known as the Labour way.

Does the average include the fee paying schools?