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minestrone
4th November 2015, 21:26
Seems to be a collection of fruitbats that crave affirmation.

Chuck
5th November 2015, 08:22
I gave up after a couple of the houses as none of them were actually homes; somewhere where you can kick off your shoes and read a book in comfort with a glass or two of wine.

They were more like gleaming showcases for the narcissistic owners.

d000hg
5th November 2015, 11:07
Is this featuring houses from the regular series or something else?

I used to watch GD avidly when it was first on but got out of the habit. This series was pretty interesting - some were ghastly but others were wonderful (and I imagine we'd totally disagree which were each). The massive car-parks with glass walls do nothing for me, but the guy who converted a cave was very interesting. And the weirdo who had also lived on boats... it's good that GD doesn't only focus on £1m builds, the smaller ones on a tight budget are often far more interesting.

Chuck
5th November 2015, 11:10
No, this is a special GD series showing off the shortlist for the RIBA House of the Year. Lots of gleaming glass carparks.

Standard GD is still excellent.

d000hg
5th November 2015, 11:12
There can be only one!

minestrone
6th November 2015, 09:47
I don't believe houses with that much glass and no carpets can be warm in the winter, even if they have paid 50 grand on triple glazing.

d000hg
6th November 2015, 10:13
Don't they always have underfloor heating?

vetran
6th November 2015, 10:28
I don't believe houses with that much glass and no carpets can be warm in the winter, even if they have paid 50 grand on triple glazing.

Does Triple Glazing Make Sense? - Homebuilding & Renovating (http://www.homebuilding.co.uk/2015/03/22/does-triple-glazing-make-sense/)


we have a south facing large conservatory, in the winter we use it to partially heat the house. In the summer we have to use the roof blinds.

BrilloPad
6th November 2015, 10:39
I always remember there was a crumbling heap of stone that was a castle once - not that you could tell. In Yorkshire. For some off reason English heritage had grade 1 listed it.

Some architect came up with this great plan to turn it into a amazing home - keeping what he could. It would cost about £500k. English heritage fought him every step of the way. At one point they were clearing away fallen stone - which was supporting the main structure. So that partly collapsed! English Heritage then caused him loads more grief.

I am pleased to say he did get a really nice home. Was it worth the aggro? English heritage should be encouraging people like him...

minestrone
6th November 2015, 10:40
Don't they always have underfloor heating?

And a boiler from the Queen Mary hidden in the basement.

vwdan
6th November 2015, 10:43
Is this featuring houses from the regular series or something else?

I used to watch GD avidly when it was first on but got out of the habit. This series was pretty interesting - some were ghastly but others were wonderful (and I imagine we'd totally disagree which were each). The massive car-parks with glass walls do nothing for me, but the guy who converted a cave was very interesting. And the weirdo who had also lived on boats... it's good that GD doesn't only focus on £1m builds, the smaller ones on a tight budget are often far more interesting.

Agreed, really really enjoyed this series. The only build I didn't particularly like was the Isle of Wight one with that chap and his near death experience. All of the others were pretty intriguing and there were a few that McCloud seemed to really take to. The cave was definitely a particular highlight.

OwlHoot
6th November 2015, 10:46
I always remember there was a crumbling heap of stone that was a castle once - not that you could tell. In Yorkshire. For some off reason English heritage had grade 1 listed it.

Some architect came up with this great plan to turn it into a amazing home - keeping what he could. It would cost about £500k. English heritage fought him every step of the way. At one point they were clearing away fallen stone - which was supporting the main structure. So that partly collapsed! English Heritage then caused him loads more grief.

I am pleased to say he did get a really nice home. Was it worth the aggro? English heritage should be encouraging people like him...

Reminds me of that heroic, or heroically stupid, guy who piled up an enormous haystack and then secretly built a castle inside it without planning consent.

It looks like he has now had to demolish it (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/11543212/Farmer-agrees-to-destroy-his-castle-after-seven-year-legal-battle.html)

Berry Pomeroy (http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/berry-pomeroy-castle/) would make a huge mansion if the owner had the funds and could get consent to renovate it looking something like (as it once did):

http://www.greydragon.org/trips/Devon&Cornwall/berry%20pomeroy014.jpg

The snag is it would cost a fortune, several million at least, I imagine as it currently resembles:

http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/35115686.jpg

minestrone
6th November 2015, 11:25
here are some of the houses...

Grand Designs: House of the Year longlist in pictures - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/11974990/Grand-Designs-House-of-the-Year-longlist-in-pictures.html?frame=3491828)

A lot of them seem to have massive amounts of floor to ceiling glass windows which must be freezing on dark winter days. They also seem to have nothing in the houses apart from a leather sofa and a dining table.

It looks to me like the modern equivalent of throwing away all your belongings and living in a monastery on the west coast.

d000hg
6th November 2015, 11:46
And then if they're proper minimalists they can't even have curtains/blinds because that would "spoil the lines" so everything you do is on display. I agree, not my style at all.

vetran
6th November 2015, 11:58
here are some of the houses...

Grand Designs: House of the Year longlist in pictures - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/11974990/Grand-Designs-House-of-the-Year-longlist-in-pictures.html?frame=3491828)

A lot of them seem to have massive amounts of floor to ceiling glass windows which must be freezing on dark winter days. They also seem to have nothing in the houses apart from a leather sofa and a dining table.

It looks to me like the modern equivalent of throwing away all your belongings and living in a monastery on the west coast.

the windows are nearly as efficient as modern built properly insulated walls and have a solar gain, note the configuration is aimed at 'low winter sun' . If the windows lose less than most traditional walls pre say 2000, the heating is something like underfloor and the house is sealed properly why do you think it would be cold?

OwlHoot
9th November 2015, 18:55
Reminds me of that heroic, or heroically stupid, guy who piled up an enormous haystack and then secretly built a castle inside it without planning consent.

It looks like he has now had to demolish it (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/11543212/Farmer-agrees-to-destroy-his-castle-after-seven-year-legal-battle.html) ...

He's been in the news again only today (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-surrey-34768403)

Mr Fidler his name is. Wasn't that the caravan site owner's name in Carry on Camping? :laugh

MicrosoftBob
9th November 2015, 20:02
He's been in the news again only today (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-surrey-34768403)

Mr Fidler his name is. Wasn't that the caravan site owner's name in Carry on Camping? :laugh

And the inspiration for it was Sandy Balls caravan site (now a 'holiday village' meh) near Ringwood