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mudskipper
8th March 2016, 20:33
:tantrum: Mum thrown out of Trafford Centre John Lewis after child had a tantrum | Metro News (http://metro.co.uk/2016/03/07/mum-thrown-out-of-john-lewis-after-her-toddler-had-a-tantrum-5737509/) :tantrum:

She got £20 out of it though - £20 a tantrum - could make a good living from that!

AtW
8th March 2016, 20:42
Never knowingly allowed chilren to have tantrums...

greenlake
8th March 2016, 20:44
If it can happen to James Kirk, it can happen to anyone....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HFAgNnXlXTw

mudskipper
8th March 2016, 20:46
She got off lightly - the woman in the linked story was thrown off a balcony.

Pondlife
8th March 2016, 20:51
She got off lightly - the woman in the linked story was thrown off a balcony.

Alternatively she could have sold the child for £2500 to buy an iPhone

Couple in China sold their baby on Facebook to buy an iPhone | Metro News (http://metro.co.uk/2016/03/08/chinese-couple-sold-their-baby-on-facebook-for-2500-to-buy-iphone-5740938/)

original PM
8th March 2016, 21:01
I was going to come on here and rant about chavs.

But then I weighed up the evidence in the story n decided who ever complained was probably a ****** sooooo.....

d000hg
8th March 2016, 21:04
I was going to come on here and rant about chavs.Because only chavvy parents have children with tantrums? Plenty of middle-class parents are as guilty ;)

SueEllen
8th March 2016, 21:07
Don't believe that kid's tantrum was that bad.

As a stranger if you look at the kid then ask them directly "What's the matter?" they shut up and try to hide behind their parent.

Obviously this doesn't work for those kids clever enough to use silent protests or if a sibling is poking/stabbing them.

mudskipper
8th March 2016, 21:13
Because only chavvy parents have children with tantrums? Plenty of middle-class parents are as guilty ;)

Middle class parents leave the children with nanny when they go shopping.

AtW
8th March 2016, 21:23
Middle class parents leave the children with Mary Poppins when they go shopping.

FTFY

original PM
8th March 2016, 21:28
Because only chavvy parents have children with tantrums? Plenty of middle-class parents are as guilty ;)

That's hipster parents you are thinking of....

Now where is my copy of Viz sure the modern parents would have a view in this.

SueEllen
8th March 2016, 21:44
Middle class parents leave the children with nanny when they go shopping.

They definitely bl**dy do not.

I sometimes wish everyone in the UK who has kids and takes them to a busy shop was from an Asian background.

d000hg
8th March 2016, 22:45
Middle class parents leave the children with nanny when they go shopping.They wish they could.

northernladuk
8th March 2016, 23:50
It takes time for piss someone off enough to go find a member of staff, complain, member of staff then has to come over and try and sort the issue. I'm wondering if we aren't talking a tantrum here, we are talking full on meltdown...both of them. Must have gone on for quite some time.

Obviously one of the two sides isn't giving the real story either. Can't help thinking about the Primark incident when I read stuff like this now.

northernladuk
8th March 2016, 23:51
They definitely bl**dy do not.

I sometimes wish everyone in the UK who has kids and takes them to a busy shop was from an Asian background.

Come to Bradford and all your wishes will be granted.

vetran
9th March 2016, 00:35
Mini Miss V who is the grand age of two was woken up after I dropped her sister off at Cadets ( we had been trying to keep her awake as otherwise she won't sleep later ) she had a full 20 mins of melt down walking round an almost empty Homebase. I let her because it was almost empty. By the time we got to Lidl she was as nice as pie.She lasted until 9:00 awake and I transferred her to bed when we got back.

Kids scream, you have to let them otherwise they get to control you. If it were busy I might leave the shop but frankly so long as you aren't letting them win and you aren't in a church, theatre or cinema then people should be supportive not complaining. I certainly would be.

northernladuk
9th March 2016, 01:08
Mini Miss V who is the grand age of two was woken up after I dropped her sister off at Cadets ( we had been trying to keep her awake as otherwise she won't sleep later ) she had a full 20 mins of melt down walking round an almost empty Homebase. I let her because it was almost empty. By the time we got to Lidl she was as nice as pie.She lasted until 9:00 awake and I transferred her to bed when we got back.

Kids scream, you have to let them otherwise they get to control you. If it were busy I might leave the shop but frankly so long as you aren't letting them win and you aren't in a church, theatre or cinema then people should be supportive not complaining. I certainly would be.

I am sure that list should be quite a bit longer than that. Being with 20 odd feet of a child in full scream is unpleasant however supportive you want to be.

SueEllen
9th March 2016, 06:58
Come to Bradford and all your wishes will be granted.

Should have been clearer.

Where I am in London I've noticed the young kids who behave the best when out shopping are from Indian, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, Chinese and Korean backgrounds.

On the other hand when they get to be teenagers and are allowed out on their own they are some of the biggest sh*ts.

mudskipper
9th March 2016, 07:26
I am sure that list should be quite a bit longer than that. Being with 20 odd feet of a child in full scream is unpleasant however supportive you want to be.

Woman who sits next to me at work was telling how people were tutting at her in a restaurant for allowing her toddler to run up and down. It was Valentine's day. My sympathy was with the other diners.

BrilloPad
9th March 2016, 08:21
And I thought this was a thread about posters in the general forum?

I always like it when someone's child has a tantrum in public. I think "for once it is not my child".

Children have tantrums. And should be welcomed in public.

I blame the baby boomers. They have the "right" to everything. Take all the healthcare, all the houses, all the money. Children should be seen and not heard. Then they can get an education(which they pay for) and spend all their lives working. For no reward.

If this carries on all the boomers will have to be shot. Except Zeity of course.....

BrilloPad
9th March 2016, 08:22
Should have been clearer.

Where I am in London I've noticed the young kids who behave the best when out shopping are from Indian, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, Chinese and Korean backgrounds.

On the other hand when they get to be teenagers and are allowed out on their own they are some of the biggest sh*ts.

And you weren't?

Boy children are generally more of a handful than girls. But the girls make up for it in the teenage years. As I am finding out.

BrilloPad
9th March 2016, 08:24
Woman who sits next to me at work was telling how people were tutting at her in a restaurant for allowing her toddler to run up and down. It was Valentine's day. My sympathy was with the other diners.

You are getting old and grumpy. I like the sound of children. Makes me feel alive.

If I want quiet, I stay home and switch the internet on. Then they are totally peaceful.

SimonMac
9th March 2016, 08:30
Kids have tantrums its a fact of life

SueEllen
9th March 2016, 09:05
You are getting old and grumpy. I like the sound of children. Makes me feel alive.

If I want quiet, I stay home and switch the internet on. Then they are totally peaceful.

I've noticed that only children in the UK have parents who think it's OK for them to run around in restaurants and cafes.

In most of the rest of Europe including other Northern European countries children don't do this.

It's common sense as you don't want hot food or drink dumped on them by accident by one of the waiting staff.

BrilloPad
9th March 2016, 09:09
I've noticed that only children in the UK have parents who think it's OK for them to run around in restaurants and cafes.

In most of the rest of Europe including other Northern European countries children don't do this.

It's common sense as you don't want hot food or drink dumped on them by accident by one of the waiting staff.

That was no accident. I tipped the waiter to do that.

More enlightened places provide soft play areas. Like centreparcs.

All restaurants should provide wifi. That is enough to shut up most kids.

mudskipper
9th March 2016, 09:11
I've noticed that only children in the UK have parents who think it's OK for them to run around in restaurants and cafes.

In most of the rest of Europe including other Northern European countries children don't do this.

It's common sense as you don't want hot food or drink dumped on them by accident by one of the waiting staff.

MaccyD's is one thing. A nice restaurant on Valentine's evening is another. If I were spending £100+ to woo my lover, I wouldn't be impressed that someone was allowing their toddler to charge about.

vetran
9th March 2016, 09:13
I am sure that list should be quite a bit longer than that. Being with 20 odd feet of a child in full scream is unpleasant however supportive you want to be.

indeed it is longer than that but it only needed an example.

John Lewis isn't a temple of peace.

Lightwave
9th March 2016, 09:13
.....

All restaurants should provide wifi. That is enough to shut up most kids.

Don't you have to turn the power up a very long way?

BrilloPad
9th March 2016, 09:14
MaccyD's is one thing. A nice restaurant on Valentine's evening is another. If I were spending £100+ to woo my lover, I wouldn't be impressed that someone was allowing their toddler to charge about.

Next time you are in a nice restaurant wooing your toyboy on Valentines day and a toddler is charging around, try having sex with him on the table.

There is a chance the parents will object. Though I remember a story of a couple having sex on a train - no-one said anything. Until the post coital cigarette..... :rolleyes:

SueEllen
9th March 2016, 09:15
MaccyD's is one thing. A nice restaurant on Valentine's evening is another. If I were spending £100+ to woo my lover, I wouldn't be impressed that someone was allowing their toddler to charge about.

Restaurants like pubs and cafes can put notices up saying no children after a certain time. Maybe this resturant would be advised to do that on certain days of the year either because adult diners expect peace or they they will be rowdy.

BrilloPad
9th March 2016, 09:18
I am sure that list should be quite a bit longer than that. Being with 20 odd feet of a child in full scream is unpleasant however supportive you want to be.

Reminds me of the time I took baby bp on a plane. He was aged 5 - but the size of a 7 year old. While getting on he totally freaked - screamed at the top of his lungs. I wrestled him into the plane. Most passengers covered their ears.

I nearly said "apologies he is autistic". But people should learn a bit of tolerance. People without disabled kids can be so smug. Autism is war - and if a child has it the whole family has it.

LondonManc
9th March 2016, 09:45
Next time you are in a nice restaurant wooing your toyboy on Valentines day and a toddler is charging around, try having sex with him on the table.

There is a chance the parents will object. Though I remember a story of a couple having sex on a train - no-one said anything. Until the post coital cigarette..... :rolleyes:

I'd object if you tried having sex with my toddler on the table.

SueEllen
9th March 2016, 09:46
Reminds me of the time I took baby bp on a plane. He was aged 5 - but the size of a 7 year old. While getting on he totally freaked - screamed at the top of his lungs. I wrestled him into the plane. Most passengers covered their ears.

I nearly said "apologies he is autistic". But people should learn a bit of tolerance. People without disabled kids can be so smug. Autism is war - and if a child has it the whole family has it.

You should have said he was autistic but you definitely don't need to apologise. That way if he decided to go walkabout people would have treated you differently and even helped.

I once got on a flight were this boy around 4 started screaming from when he got to the terminal and continued on the plane. His mother and grandmother were asked if the kid was upset or had a disability. They replied he was just "being naughty." Since the boy hadn't stop showing he was distressed when the plane landed 2.5 hours later I doubt he was "being naughty".

mudskipper
9th March 2016, 10:03
I'd object if you tried having sex with my toddler on the table.

Where should he have sex with your toddler then?

d000hg
9th March 2016, 10:18
Kids have tantrums its a fact of lifeBut how frequently, how badly, and so on are at least partly a measure of parental discipline and control. Not in every case, some kids are just awful despite having great parents, but generally.

There's also the issue of whether you decide your kid being a screaming wreck is something you want to inflict on the world, and if you shouldn't be considering that you have to make sacrifices to have kids - sleep, fancy restaurants, etc. "Why shouldn't I be allowed to do what I want" seems to be the mantra along with "how dare you comment on my parenting".

BrilloPad
9th March 2016, 10:22
Where should he have sex with your toddler then?

According to the BBC, anywhere seems fine.....

suityou01
9th March 2016, 10:24
Being highly intelligent my children are also highly intelligent. If they are having a meltdown, there is generally a reason, like they just logged in and got a ton of Windows updates when all they want is a quick blast on Minecraft before school. :nerd

I listen to my kids. :D

FatLazyContractor
9th March 2016, 10:25
Where should he have sex with your toddler then?

Here (http://forums.contractoruk.com/general/83418-jimmy-savile-household-name-sweep.html?highlight=Jimmy) :rolleyes:

FatLazyContractor
9th March 2016, 10:28
Being highly intelligent my children are also highly intelligent. If they are having a meltdown, there is generally a reason, like they just logged in and got a ton of Windows updates when all they want is a quick blast on Minecraft before school. :nerd

I listen to my kids. :D

Have you heard that you can turn them off? :eyes

BrilloPad
9th March 2016, 10:28
But how frequently, how badly, and so on are at least partly a measure of parental discipline and control. Not in every case, some kids are just awful despite having great parents, but generally.

There's also the issue of whether you decide your kid being a screaming wreck is something you want to inflict on the world, and if you shouldn't be considering that you have to make sacrifices to have kids - sleep, fancy restaurants, etc. "Why shouldn't I be allowed to do what I want" seems to be the mantra along with "how dare you comment on my parenting".

Happens everywhere now. No consideration for anyone else. Like pedestrians who just walk out into the road under the wheels of my bike - if they want to get hit by 100kgs of bike and human then fine. But the cyclist gets hurt too.

Equally I would like some consideration of my disabled children. And the "normal" one too. Whatever normal means.....

BrilloPad
9th March 2016, 10:29
Have you heard that you can turn them off? :eyes

Children? :confused:

sasguru
9th March 2016, 10:34
These people should have a German nanny like we had when sprog was small.
If he's being naughty now, I only have to tell him to "Halt's Maul!" and he clicks his heels, gives a little salute and says "Yahwohl, mein fuhrer".
No I'm not joking. But I hope he is.

suityou01
9th March 2016, 10:34
Reminds me of the time I took baby bp on a plane. He was aged 5 - but the size of a 7 year old. While getting on he totally freaked - screamed at the top of his lungs. I wrestled him into the plane. Most passengers covered their ears.

I nearly said "apologies he is autistic". But people should learn a bit of tolerance. People without disabled kids can be so smug. Autism is war - and if a child has it the whole family has it.

On a camping trip last year I was playing petanque with the kids and one of the other camper's little darlings climbed through my legs as I was mid bowl and punched me in my left nut as hard as he could. I was visibly in pain and distress, and had a dull ache for several days later.

The parents just laughed it off as he has ADHD. I did not feel that understanding toward the condition and still don't. Badly behaved is badly behaved and it is the parent's responsibility to keep their children under control while in public.

suityou01
9th March 2016, 10:35
These people should have a German nanny like we had when sprog was small.
If he's being naughty now, I only have to tell him to "Halt's Maul!" and he clicks his heels, gives a little salute and says "Yahwohl, mein fuhrer".
No I'm not joking. But I hope he is.

:spel Jawol

mudskipper
9th March 2016, 10:38
When a child (disabled or otherwise) is having a meltdown, it might exacerbate less visible issues for others who are in the vicinity. e.g. does someone suffering from anxiety not have as much "right" to consideration as the parent with the screaming child?

FatLazyContractor
9th March 2016, 10:44
On a camping trip last year I was playing petanque with the kids and one of the other camper's little darlings climbed through my legs as I was mid bowl and punched me in my left nut as hard as he could. I was visibly in pain and distress, and had a dull ache for several days later.

The parents just laughed it off as he has ADHD. I did not feel that understanding toward the condition and still don't. Badly behaved is badly behaved and it is the parent's responsibility to keep their children under control while in public.

Moral of the story - Even kids feel like punching Suity :D

suityou01
9th March 2016, 10:48
Moral of the story - Even kids feel like punching Suity :D

http://pixel.nymag.com/imgs/daily/vulture/2015/gifs/leo-toast-9.w529.h352.gif

d000hg
9th March 2016, 10:50
When a child (disabled or otherwise) is having a meltdown, it might exacerbate less visible issues for others who are in the vicinity. e.g. does someone suffering from anxiety not have as much "right" to consideration as the parent with the screaming child?

Yes but a badly placed tin of baked beans could 'trigger' someone it seems these days.

mudskipper
9th March 2016, 10:56
So if (hypothetically) the complaint in JL was that toddler throwing a paddy (not disabled AFAIK) is distressing a disabled child who suffers from anxiety, what should the JL staff do?

norrahe
9th March 2016, 11:00
I've noticed that only children in the UK have parents who think it's OK for them to run around in restaurants and cafes.

In most of the rest of Europe including other Northern European countries children don't do this.

It's common sense as you don't want hot food or drink dumped on them by accident by one of the waiting staff.

Come to cloggers and you'll find its far worse.

TheFaQQer
9th March 2016, 11:12
Middle class parents leave the children with nanny when they go shopping.

I thought they left them in the hotel room while they went for tapas?

northernladuk
9th March 2016, 11:14
I thought they left them in the hotel room while they went for tapas?

Only if they are sedated first.

ContractorOnAMotorbike
9th March 2016, 11:15
Reminds me of the time I took baby bp on a plane. He was aged 5 - but the size of a 7 year old. While getting on he totally freaked - screamed at the top of his lungs. I wrestled him into the plane. Most passengers covered their ears.

I nearly said "apologies he is autistic". But people should learn a bit of tolerance. People without disabled kids can be so smug. Autism is war - and if a child has it the whole family has it.

Yep agreed. I've come to the conclusion that a lot of people tut and shake their heads for the smallest thing no matter what you try to do... the type of people who prefer if children are seen and not heard. Just ignore them and carry on. No doubt they popped into this world as fully grown (and intolerant) adults.

Pondlife
9th March 2016, 11:16
I thought they left them in the hotel room while they went for tapas?

Who had 51 posts in the sweepstake? Anyone? :eek

TheFaQQer
9th March 2016, 11:18
On a camping trip last year I was playing petanque with the kids and one of the other camper's little darlings climbed through my legs as I was mid bowl and punched me in my left nut as hard as he could. I was visibly in pain and distress, and had a dull ache for several days later.

That made me laugh. Sorry.

TheFaQQer
9th March 2016, 11:20
So if (hypothetically) the complaint in JL was that toddler throwing a paddy (not disabled AFAIK) is distressing a disabled child who suffers from anxiety, what should the JL staff do?

Administer a sharp slap on the legs to both children, then send them on their way.

mudskipper
9th March 2016, 11:20
Who had 51 posts in the sweepstake? Anyone? :eek

TF did. :laugh

LondonManc
9th March 2016, 11:41
Where should he have sex with your toddler then?

Wherever you want. That's just my name for Mrs LM after a bottle of wine. Mainly because she can't walk properly after and also because she's had a bottle of wine. :smokin

BrilloPad
9th March 2016, 11:46
Come to cloggers and you'll find its far worse.

I thought in cloggers all the children had been sold for snuff movies?

MyUserName
9th March 2016, 13:34
Reminds me of the time I took baby bp on a plane. He was aged 5 - but the size of a 7 year old. While getting on he totally freaked - screamed at the top of his lungs. I wrestled him into the plane. Most passengers covered their ears.

I nearly said "apologies he is autistic". But people should learn a bit of tolerance. People without disabled kids can be so smug. Autism is war - and if a child has it the whole family has it.

Agreed. When my daughter does dance performances etc. then we make set of leaflets for her explaining her quirks and ask her to hand one to the supervising grownups. Other times we just have to handle it whichever way works e.g. she used to go mad if people starting singing "Happy Birthday" or giving a wedding speech because she knew people would clap after it so I had to take her out of the room.

MarillionFan
9th March 2016, 13:52
Yep agreed. I've come to the conclusion that a lot of people tut and shake their heads for the smallest thing no matter what you try to do... the type of people who prefer if children are seen and not heard. Just ignore them and carry on. No doubt they popped into this world as fully grown (and intolerant) adults.





I find people who tut irritating and it's guaranteed to get an immediate response of me.


When my daughter was about 18 months she went on a plane for the first time, and from about 20 minutes in her temperature went up and she had a meltdown. Now it could be ear pressure, but she was distressed and cried. Being a crap Thomas Cook flight, they wouldn't let us in the galley and the toilet was tiny, and it was stressful for both me and the wife as having a screaming child isn't fair on anyone around, and so puts the stress back on you.


So up and down we went, trying to stay at the back of the plane, then coming back when it looked like she might calm down. Spent ages in the bogs at the back, but to no avail. Most people were sympathetic, but the woman in front of us, kept turning around, looking at my daughter, shaking her head and tutting.


After the about the forth time of these disgusted looks, she turned around, stared again, loudly tutted, and so I leant over and in no uncertain terms told her 'If you turn around, look at me and tut again, I'm going to pluck your ******* eyes out'


Took three years before we ever went on another flight, and I've never flown Thomas Cook again.

d000hg
9th March 2016, 13:58
Flying is a tough one. It is HORRIBLE being trapped near a screaming kid on a plane but there's realistically nothing much the parents can do and (if they're not awful people) they're probably rather embarrassed and hating it as much themselves. Maybe planes should offer free ear-plugs?

I do find it annoying when you stump up to travel 1st-class on a train and in the quiet coach there are people with kids. Young kids can't be blamed if they haven't learned volume control properly but their parents can be blamed for being thoughtless.

LondonManc
9th March 2016, 14:04
I do find it annoying when you stump up to travel 1st-class on a train and in the quiet coach there are people with kids. Young kids can't be blamed if they haven't learned volume control properly but their parents can be blamed for being thoughtless.

Correct. Up there with parents taking their kids to decent restaurants on Feb 14th or after 9pm.

BrilloPad
9th March 2016, 14:06
I've never flown Thomas Cook again.

Don't Thomas Cook have first class flights to the West Coast?

BrilloPad
9th March 2016, 14:08
I was on a train about a year ago where some parents were getting stressed at their(obviously bored) children.

I arranged for the twins to amuse them for an hour - which gave the whole carriage some peace.

MarillionFan
9th March 2016, 14:12
Don't Thomas Cook have first class flights to the West Coast?



This was when I was still a poor contractor and had to travel Economy.

BrilloPad
9th March 2016, 14:14
This was before my sledges deal and had to travel Economy.

FTFY

TheFaQQer
9th March 2016, 14:31
I was on a train about a year ago where some parents were getting stressed at their(obviously bored) children.

I arranged for the twins to amuse them for an hour - which gave the whole carriage some peace.

Please tell me that's not a euphemism.

NotAllThere
9th March 2016, 14:31
I carry a set of cards with the number 1 to 9 on them and then grade the tantrum. Arms and legs thrashing and screaming are necessary for full points, as are parents who have completely lost the ability to control their child.

My children seldom had tantrums. When they started, one of us would pick 'em up, hold any flailing arms and/or legs, and take them out. If shopping alone, then the shopping trolley was abandoned. The main point was to demonstrate that all times mum/dad is in control.

BrilloPad
9th March 2016, 14:56
The main point was to demonstrate that all times mum/dad is in control.

Bollox. Children know you better than you know yourself. They push you to your limit - and just a bit beyond.

original PM
9th March 2016, 15:09
Bollox. Children know you better than you know yourself. They push you to your limit - and just a bit beyond.

No, no they don't in every adult - child relationship there is one adult and one child - make sure if you are the adult you act like it.

....

NotAllThere
9th March 2016, 16:04
Bollox. Children know you better than you know yourself. They push you to your limit - and just a bit beyond.Only if you're a bad parent. :tongue

(Yes, yes, I know... then you point to the mounds in the garden. "We used to have seven children. But then three misbehaved...").

LondonManc
9th March 2016, 16:09
Push their buttons to get them in line before they push yours. If they can push yours you haven't sufficiently learned as a parent. Or you're a lentil-muncher who insists the little twunt should be allowed to express themselves when they're simply being naughty.

original PM
9th March 2016, 17:46
Push their buttons to get them in line before they push yours. If they can push yours you haven't sufficiently learned as a parent. Or you're a lentil-muncher who insists the little twunt should be allowed to express themselves when they're simply being naughty.

dead right - plan ahead - even a 3 year old can understand things if explained to them what is happening

but from the amount of Muppets you see in airport who for whatever reason seem to leave all sense of reason behind them when they get airside I guess it is rarely the kids fault