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KentDogWalker
19th March 2016, 16:02
Considering the coding skills we have, I wonder why not many of us just don't go ahead and form startups that generate income, instead of actually having to go and work every day?

eek
19th March 2016, 16:04
Considering the coding skills we have, I wonder why not many of us just don't go ahead and form startups that generate income, instead of actually having to go and work every day?

Because having been there it's far harder work than turning up at an office a day and earning £400+ for not much effort

SueEllen
19th March 2016, 16:21
What is the percentage of start ups that fail?

NorthWestPerm2Contr
19th March 2016, 19:49
It's really not easy to find a good idea that can't be taken apart by a Dragon.....

I'm looking to leave contracting and get involved in a startup but the journey getting here has been hellish.

2uk
19th March 2016, 20:45
This is a tough question not to ridicule... but the main reasons are the same as why you can't get quality girls in your life .... you have been poorly educated by a public system designed to create robots and you have not been born at privileged family.

MarillionFan
19th March 2016, 20:56
I think that quite a few do, do that. It's just youre not going to read about it on CUK because anybody who was a real entrepreneur is not going to waste their bloody time posting crap on an Internet forum.

The squirrel bothering Russian is an exception

SueEllen
19th March 2016, 20:59
The squirrel bothering Russian and his sockies randomly stop posting for months at a time.

tomtomagain
19th March 2016, 20:59
Considering the coding skills we have, I wonder why not many of us just don't go ahead and form startups that generate income, instead of actually having to go and work every day?

It takes a lot more skills than just coding to run a successful start up.

I have been running mine for two years now full time. I get to spend about 30% of my time coding the rest is product support, marketing, sales calls, accounting, chasing debtors, updating the company website and preparing proposals.

They are all learnable skills and techies are usually good at learning new things and implementing them in a systematic manner but don't kid yourself that if you are a good coder that you have all the skills in place to run a start-up.

Running a start-up is not the easy option. Sure I've not had to commute or attend a meeting for two years but I certainly don't work less-hard than I did when I was in corporate world. And although I am more in control of my diary, I don't have complete freedom to do whatever I want, whenever I want to. My customers are still working 9-5 and expect answers during their working days. My customer base is global, so I need to be in a position to respond 24/7/365.

There is lots of help out there for UK start-ups. Since striking out on my own I've started to attend start-up groups and get involved with my local start-up organisation. There is a thriving UK start-up scene.


BUT I think the main reason most people don't start their own start up is simple .... they don't have a problem that they feel passionate enough about to spend 6 - 9 months solving without pay and without guarantee of reward.

Taking £400 per day of someone else's money to work on something that may or may not succeed is the easy option.

tomtomagain
19th March 2016, 21:01
I'm looking to leave contracting and get involved in a startup but the journey getting here has been hellish.

Well keep going. It is possible.

AtW
19th March 2016, 21:09
It's really not easy to find a good idea that can't be taken apart by a Dragon.....

Why do you care about their view?

There is a lot more finance available to high tech companies in UK compared to 10 years ago, or even 5 - "Dragons" were offering 25 grand for 150% of the business, or something like that - it was a joke when they started and now it's not even funny.

Troll
21st March 2016, 09:26
You wouldn't believe the amount of work involved in getting a company off the ground through pilots and into profitability from a standing start

The things that I remember are taking a PC (not a laptop) away on a family holiday so I could do the brochures / advertising etc when the kids were in bed , roping the missus into being a free call answering service during the day (some feckwits failed to realise that doing dirty phone calls to an 0800 number are easily traced!)

Then once you have your fledgling company up and running you have to take it to the next level and bet the house against it's success - not a decision to take lightly when you have small children

It really peeves me off when career politicians think companies magically spring out of the ground

In the end it is sooooo much easier to take the £500 @ day and have a family life

HTH

DodgyAgent
21st March 2016, 09:39
I think that quite a few do, do that. It's just youre not going to read about it on CUK because anybody who was a real entrepreneur is not going to waste their bloody time posting crap on an Internet forum.

The squirrel bothering Russian is an exception

As his personal agent please address all your communication with him through me :happy

DodgyAgent
21st March 2016, 09:40
You wouldn't believe the amount of work involved in getting a company off the ground through pilots and into profitability from a standing start

The things that I remember are taking a PC (not a laptop) away on a family holiday so I could do the brochures / advertising etc when the kids were in bed , roping the missus into being a free call answering service during the day (some feckwits failed to realise that doing dirty phone calls to an 0800 number are easily traced!)

Then once you have your fledgling company up and running you have to take it to the next level and bet the house against it's success - not a decision to take lightly when you have small children

It really peeves me off when career politicians think companies magically spring out of the ground

In the end it is sooooo much easier to take the £500 @ day and have a family life

HTH

Why not set up a recruitment agency?. All you need is a phone and a pair of brass boll*cks :happy

SimonMac
21st March 2016, 09:43
Considering the coding skills we have, I wonder why not many of us just don't go ahead and form startups that generate income, instead of actually having to go and work every day?

Lot's of contractors do, however not many CUK forumites have the desire to do so, which is explained by the amount of time they can spend on here

BrilloPad
21st March 2016, 09:57
I have setup loads of businesses. And lost them through divorce.....

DimPrawn
21st March 2016, 10:16
I'm working on plan b so that I can make enough money to move to Spain. I don't expect it to match UK contracting income or make me a millionaire, but fund an early working "retirement".

KentDogWalker
21st March 2016, 11:33
So the jist of it I am getting here is that is is just too much hard work, save divine intervention.

DodgyAgent
21st March 2016, 11:38
So the jist of it I am getting here is that is is just too much hard work, save divine intervention. :laugh

d000hg
21st March 2016, 11:39
Considering the coding skills we have, I wonder why not many of us just don't go ahead and form startups that generate income, instead of actually having to go and work every day?

Because the coding is about 10% of the work required.

DimPrawn
21st March 2016, 11:50
Because the coding is about 10% of the work required.

If that. Depends on the business of course.

DimPrawn
21st March 2016, 11:51
So the jist of it I am getting here is that is is just too much hard work, save divine intervention.

Give it a try and tell us how you get on. Good luck.

Troll
21st March 2016, 11:56
Why not set up a recruitment agency?. All you need is a phone and a pair of brass boll*cks :happyI'm too honest I guess - think most start up a recruitment agent by snaffing their existing clients DB from current employer

NotAllThere
21st March 2016, 12:56
I'm too honest I guess - think most start up a recruitment agent by snaffing their existing clients DB from current employer

Step 1. Get job with DA.

DodgyAgent
21st March 2016, 13:03
Step 1. Get job with DA.

:spank:

Dactylion
21st March 2016, 13:09
I'm working on plan b so that I can make enough money to move to Spain. I don't expect it to match UK contracting income or make me a millionaire, but fund an early working "retirement".

I heard that Sticky Vicky is thinking of retiring. Sticky Prawn sounds like a plan!

d000hg
21st March 2016, 13:34
Interesting point DP. How much would people require to earn through their own plan B in return for total freedom from employment of any type - and how much work would you be prepared to put in day-to-day?

jmo21
21st March 2016, 13:47
Because the coding is about 10% of the work required.

This is the answer.

I love the thought of starting some unique (or not necessarily unique) website, that could generate money, but frankly, I have **** all original ideas!

And that is the number one reason most developers do not start their own "real" businesses.

KentDogWalker
21st March 2016, 13:52
Interesting point DP. How much would people require to earn through their own plan B in return for total freedom from employment of any type - and how much work would you be prepared to put in day-to-day?

This is the million $ question. I think this could be quite low, for me it would be 1/3 of my daily date, if I could be sure that it would be long term income > 15 years. After all one of the reasons we work so hard is to save for the future and future uncertainty.

DimPrawn
21st March 2016, 18:11
Interesting point DP. How much would people require to earn through their own plan B in return for total freedom from employment of any type - and how much work would you be prepared to put in day-to-day?

Cost of living and tax burden is very high in the UK, I reckon a very comfortable life in Spain on £2K a month, assuming property is owned outright (so no mortgage/rent payments).

A plan b that can generate £2K a month should be achievable without being some kind of brilliant Dragons Den type business.

DallasDad
21st March 2016, 20:49
Not coding but Cameras
Security Cameras, no moving parts, 360 degree view, Masking software to select and correct the desired view and block off certain areas (bog doors etc).

Lets call him Bob.

Bob has been a one man band designing the electronics, the prototype housings, lens, interfaces, firmware and applications for several years.

He provides customer support, arranges manufacturing (UK and China) employs Sales and Marketing assistance as needed.

Bob does not have kids and loves his work (read that as he does very long days)

Bobs been at it for years and years, it is living and to be honest quite a good one but as posted above perhaps only 25% of his time is in productive R&D, the rest is the associated baggage and that I think is his limiting factor.

To progress he needs premises, more staff and a dirty great loan. I think he is happy where he is. He knows his limitations.

Timing your startup and knowing the market is everything for example once upon a time there was a startup Company called Gigawave working out of a small office in Coggeshall Essex.

When my wife Karen joined them they were 6 month old, with about 4 people. The brain child of an eccentric chap called Henry Barczynski who re mortgaged himself to the hilt to get up and running.

They specialised in miniaturised microwave data transmissions for military and broadcast purposes.
They hit the market at exactly the right time (mid nineties) and grew rapidly, helped by contracts in Camel & Powerboat Racing and especially Formula 1 providing some of the first live car to pit transmission of pictures and data.

I remember the first live in race F1 broadcast through the tunnel at Monaco was tested by said Henry on a Moped with Karen and crew aligning the reception kit.
A couple of years later Karen was doing testing with the Williams team in Barcelona when I had a phone call - announcing she was pregnant with our first son, she left a few month later and I think regrets not going back but we do have three super sons as compensation! If she had stayed I suspect she would have benefited from the companies growing success.

The company went from strength to strength and was bought out in 2011 with something like 100 employees.

Good luck to you that have similar goals it is hard but not impossible

darmstadt
21st March 2016, 21:27
The EU can help :tongue

Austrian startup develops tablet for the blind - The Local (http://www.thelocal.at/20160321/austrian-startup-develops-tablet-for-the-blind)

AtW
21st March 2016, 21:45
Young people forsake start-up dreams for security and a salary ** (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2016/03/21/young-people-forsake-start-up-dreams-for-security-and-a-salary/)

"This is a major change in attitude: the number of under-35s starting businesses in the UK rose by more than 70pc between 2006 and 2014, according to data from Duedil and small business organisation Enterprise Nation, but the boom in young entrepreneurship appears to be coming to an end. "

---------

Can't blame them - failure is most likely, and even if you are successful the Govt will fook you over with new taxes, thanks to "pro-business" Tory Scum.

d000hg
21st March 2016, 22:48
Only if you are so successful it doesn't actually matter too much.

vetran
22nd March 2016, 00:47
I heard that Sticky Vicky is thinking of retiring. Sticky Prawn sounds like a plan!

shooting Bowling balls out of your booty?