PDA

View Full Version : Working Hours a week?



gawainuk
21st December 2016, 19:40
Hi,

I've been offered a contract which states a 48 hour working week is this the norm now for IT work or are the agency trying to pull a fast one?

This is only my second contract since leaving a permie role and my first contract is, what I thought was, a standard 40 hour week.

The 48 hour a week contract pays more on a day rate but the days are going to be longer so it would actually be a pay cut based on rate per hour.

What's the general consensus? Am I being precious and naive about the modern contracting world or is the agency trying to take me for a costly ride?

:ind

ladymuck
21st December 2016, 19:44
Taking the p*ss

Ask for the contract to be amended to state "professional working day during normal business hours of operation"

gawainuk
21st December 2016, 20:06
Taking the p*ss

Ask for the contract to be amended to state "professional working day during normal business hours of operation"

Thanks, I'll do that and stay where I am if they get funny :happy

NotAllThere
21st December 2016, 20:13
In the UK, I never had more than 37 hour week. Sometimes 35. Other places, 40 to 45 hours. Anything above 40 is pointless, since most people just stretch the work they do to fit.

DimPrawn
21st December 2016, 21:14
Perm these days is 35 or 37 hours. Every contract I've ever had has been 37 or 40 hours max.

Anything more than that is Victorian slave labour.

SlipTheJab
21st December 2016, 21:31
Most I've ever done is 40 every other contract has been 37ish, 48 is indeed taking the piss, I may do 48+ hours on some weeks but that's my choice not some pimps mandate...

Fronttoback
21st December 2016, 21:39
Take the higher paid 48 hour one. And do a strict 9.5 hour day.

I usually work 9-7 and bill 40 hours because I'm on a day rate. Who does 9-6? Certainly in London you would be marked as a clock watcher.

So what I'm saying is , even if you pick the 36 hour one, you'll end up doing 48 hours at your stage in your career.

Caveat - this is unusual so I would be asking a lot of questions in the interview. Do your research on the gig.

TNA57
21st December 2016, 22:40
Take the higher paid 48 hour one. And do a strict 9.5 hour day.

I usually work 9-7 and bill 40 hours because I'm on a day rate. Who does 9-6? Certainly in London you would be marked as a clock watcher.

So what I'm saying is , even if you pick the 36 hour one, you'll end up doing 48 hours at your stage in your career.

Caveat - this is unusual so I would be asking a lot of questions in the interview. Do your research on the gig.

I certainly do not admire your working hours Fronttoback. Why work 9-7 everyday????
Even at 9-5 i've done the best for the day and the rest will follow next day. Except you're sitting in meeting all the time..doable... otherwise i wouldn't recommend straightforward taking the gig at 48hours. As someone has said negotiate the terms and get PWD in there as opposed to 48hours.

I would most certainly be happy to do more than 40 hours a week knowing it was my choice rather than just sitting there in an office trying to make up 48 hours not being productive. On top of that, you might need to work extra hours too occasionally- come on! How many hours a day can your brain function optimally? And if you have family that's another couple of hours or so you can spend with them. Good luck with negotiating the terms!

ladymuck
21st December 2016, 22:48
My brain is generally fried by 4:30pm and then I just coax the day out to 5pm but will just go home if I've really had enough. I will always work later when it's genuinely needed. If I have a commute (current gig is only a 20 min walk from home) then I aim to get in early so I miss the worst of the great unwashed public but will aim to leave early too.

jbond007
22nd December 2016, 07:58
Take the higher paid 48 hour one. And do a strict 9.5 hour day.

I usually work 9-7 and bill 40 hours because I'm on a day rate. Who does 9-6? Certainly in London you would be marked as a clock watcher.

So what I'm saying is , even if you pick the 36 hour one, you'll end up doing 48 hours at your stage in your career.

Caveat - this is unusual so I would be asking a lot of questions in the interview. Do your research on the gig.

I've contracted in London and finished at 5:30 regularly. Was never marked as a clock watcher. Though I'm not in finance and usually in Media/Telco sector.

MyUserName
22nd December 2016, 08:21
Take the higher paid 48 hour one. And do a strict 9.5 hour day.

I usually work 9-7 and bill 40 hours because I'm on a day rate. Who does 9-6? Certainly in London you would be marked as a clock watcher.

So what I'm saying is , even if you pick the 36 hour one, you'll end up doing 48 hours at your stage in your career.

Caveat - this is unusual so I would be asking a lot of questions in the interview. Do your research on the gig.

F**K THAT!

The only time I came across hours like this was at Bloomberg and I turned them down at the interview stage.

MrMarkyMark
22nd December 2016, 08:26
When I'm in the office, start just after 8, out the door at 5, that's in IB.

VectraMan
22nd December 2016, 08:32
WTS. Sod that.

My last one said 40, but then it was WFH so I've no idea how they thought that would work. I've always thought that I'd probably be most productive if I worked the morning, say 4 or 5 hours and then took the afternoons off. But office culture doesn't work that way.

BrilloPad
22nd December 2016, 08:33
In the UK, I never had more than 37 hour week. Sometimes 35. Other places, 40 to 45 hours. Anything above 40 is pointless, since most people just stretch the work they do to fit.

Very true for development. For support its not that easy.

woohoo
22nd December 2016, 08:37
I don't do more than 35 hours a week.

BrilloPad
22nd December 2016, 08:46
I don't do more than 35 hours a week.

Neither does NLyUK.

Lockhouse
22nd December 2016, 08:48
IB front office. 45 to 50 hours per week. Decent daily rate plus WFH Fridays.

Can't remember the last time I worked anywhere where 35 hours was the norm.

psychocandy
22nd December 2016, 08:52
Heres my take. Average about 37.5 to 40 hours per week. Note average. If I do a little more no issue - if I do a lot more then I expect some favours in return.

I would not regularly work 9-7 - I have a life.

Seen things in the past like this:-

1) One interview where they said they expected contractors to work around 50 hours a week. Thank you find some other mug.

2) When I first started I asked the agent what hours and he said they normally worked hard every day 9-6. When I got there it was nothing of the sort.

For (2) I realised. If agent tells contractor to work 9-6 its no skin off agents nose - in fact, he gets client telling him how much he likes this hard working contractor who works all these hours. This could be the case here.

For me, I go to a new gig I assume its going to be approx 9-5 unless told otherwise. If I can get it to 8-4 or whatever then its a bonus. If I can get WFH at some point its also a bonus.

However, extra hours all the time will see me not extending the contract.

psychocandy
22nd December 2016, 08:53
IB front office. 45 to 50 hours per week. Decent daily rate plus WFH Fridays.

Can't remember the last time I worked anywhere where 35 hours was the norm.

50 hours a week = no way. Not even for double my normal rate.

No point being the richest man in the graveyard. And Im sure my kids will remember me doing things with them than how rich I was.

woohoo
22nd December 2016, 08:54
IB front office. 45 to 50 hours per week. Decent daily rate plus WFH Fridays.

Can't remember the last time I worked anywhere where 35 hours was the norm.

In my opinion if you are using your brain you can only do a certain amount of hours. I don't see any point in watching the clock to leave.

SimonMac
22nd December 2016, 08:55
I am a supplier not a freelancer, as long as I get the work done I have to I don't worry about the hours, and neither does the Client. If your "boss" is clock watching your every move you have bigger problems than what your hourly rate works out as

PurpleGorilla
22nd December 2016, 08:56
It's quality not quantity guys!

https://youtu.be/_iiOEQOtBlQ

GB9
22nd December 2016, 09:12
40 plus for current client. 50 plus for the last one.

I tend to worry less about the hourly rate and more on the Daily.

VectraMan
22nd December 2016, 09:49
It's quality not quantity guys!

https://youtu.be/_iiOEQOtBlQ

Why doesn't everyone go ahead and watch that.

TheFaQQer
22nd December 2016, 10:03
Why doesn't everyone go ahead and watch that.

That'd be great

ladymuck
22nd December 2016, 13:53
It's quality not quantity guys!

https://youtu.be/_iiOEQOtBlQ

Love that film!

Flashman
22nd December 2016, 14:00
Hi,

I've been offered a contract which states a 48 hour working week is this the norm now for IT work or are the agency trying to pull a fast one?

This is only my second contract since leaving a permie role and my first contract is, what I thought was, a standard 40 hour week.

The 48 hour a week contract pays more on a day rate but the days are going to be longer so it would actually be a pay cut based on rate per hour.

What's the general consensus? Am I being precious and naive about the modern contracting world or is the agency trying to take me for a costly ride?

:ind

So basically they want you to work the equivalent of a 6 day week ...and get paid for 5?

***PERMIE CRAP ALERT ***

d000hg
22nd December 2016, 14:06
If you're a permie aren't you entitled to paid lunchbreak, or did I imagine that? i.e. a 40 hour week is actually 37.5 working hours + mandatory 30 minute paid lunchbreak...

FrontEnder
22nd December 2016, 14:08
If the contract says a minimum of 48 hours and is also more than 17 weeks, it's automatically in breach of the working time directive.

PurpleGorilla
22nd December 2016, 14:08
If you're a permie aren't you entitled to paid lunchbreak, or did I imagine that? i.e. a 40 hour week is actually 37.5 working hours + mandatory 30 minute paid lunchbreak...

I always deduct my lunch break from my billed time.

d000hg
22nd December 2016, 14:10
If the contract says a minimum of 48 hours and is also more than 17 weeks, it's automatically in breach of the working time directive.THey can get you to opt out of the WTD though. I did that for a permie job once.


I always deduct my lunch break from my billed time.You're not a permie though.

vetran
22nd December 2016, 14:27
If you're a permie aren't you entitled to paid lunchbreak, or did I imagine that? i.e. a 40 hour week is actually 37.5 working hours + mandatory 30 minute paid lunchbreak...

No, you are entitled to breaks you aren't entitled to be paid.

https://www.gov.uk/rest-breaks-work/overview

gawainuk
22nd December 2016, 15:15
The agency has now come back and said it's a typo and it's a 40 week.

The mention of 48 hours was only for the opt to the WTD form included on the email, apparently.

Anyway, I'll be giving the contract a very thorough read before I sign, thank you all for the information.

northernladuk
22nd December 2016, 15:21
The agency has now come back and said it's a typo and it's a 40 week.

The mention of 48 hours was only for the opt to the WTD form included on the email, apparently.

Anyway, I'll be giving the contract a very thorough read before I sign, thank you all for the information.

You'll be getting it professionally reviewed as well?

Fronttoback
22nd December 2016, 15:58
IB front office. 45 to 50 hours per week. Decent daily rate plus WFH Fridays.

Same working env as you, but I rarely go into the office. Only when a release is coming up or I must to go to a few meetings.

I must admit I have always done long hours. But I've always worked in financial software dev- and it is common. My father used to arrive home from work before 5pm everyday!

psychocandy
23rd December 2016, 09:42
The agency has now come back and said it's a typo and it's a 40 week.

The mention of 48 hours was only for the opt to the WTD form included on the email, apparently.

Anyway, I'll be giving the contract a very thorough read before I sign, thank you all for the information.

The old typo excuse. Bullshit. If you'd signed it and then proceeded to work 48 hours then they would not have put you right believe me.

As above, happy client with contractor working his nuts off for extra hours.

SueEllen
23rd December 2016, 11:51
The old typo excuse. Bulltulip. If you'd signed it and then proceeded to work 48 hours then they would not have put you right believe me.

As above, happy client with contractor working his nuts off for extra hours.

Depends on the client.

I had an agency sign me up for 40 hours. The client said yes it is 40 hours with an hour unpaid lunch per day. And you have to take a lunch break.