PDA

View Full Version : My Life is Complete



Lucifer Box
10th November 2006, 21:51
Jenny Agutter sat next to me on the tube this afternoon and clucked and cooed over my baby son.

The saucy minx had her shirt loosely buttoned as well as she kept leaning forwards...

Sorry, just have to nip to the bathroom...

Again.

SallyAnne
10th November 2006, 22:04
Jenny Agutter sat next to me on the tube this afternoon and clucked and cooed over my baby son.

The saucy minx had her shirt loosely buttoned as well as she kept leaning forwards...

Sorry, just have to nip to the bathroom...

Again.

Baby son? I do apologise Mr Lucifer - I had you pegged as a 55/60 year old. You are clearly just a very mature man!

Bravo to you.

Lucifer Box
10th November 2006, 22:10
An old fart before my time, you mean? :p

I blame Zeity's influence.

SallyAnne
10th November 2006, 22:11
An old fart before my time, you mean? :p

I blame Zeity's influence.


I dont know why - you dont come accross as boring or anything....you must just ooze maturity :)

Lucifer Box
10th November 2006, 22:17
I dont know why - you dont come accross as boring or anything....you must just ooze maturity :)
Well, I'm having a couple of glasses of a nice 12 year old scotch so maybe that's what you can detect seeping out of me?

You, on the other hand, ooze perkiness, vivaciousness and fun.

SallyAnne
10th November 2006, 22:21
Well, I'm having a couple of glasses of a nice 12 year old scotch so maybe that's what you can detect seeping out of me?

You, on the other hand, ooze perkiness, vivaciousness and fun.


yay :) That about sums me up! I'm obviously not oozing much of it tonight being stuck in the house like, but this is very much a one off.

Hows your scotch working out for you then? :)

Lucifer Box
10th November 2006, 22:29
yay :) That about sums me up! I'm obviously not oozing much of it tonight being stuck in the house like, but this is very much a one off.

Hows your scotch working out for you then? :)
Ah, quality always shines through, SallyAnne. It will make next Friday all the more welcome. What's a good night out for you then?

It's working wonders. I can feel my toes curling as that warming liquid works its Friday evening magic. Just hoping my boy doesn't get me up too early in the morning.

SallyAnne
10th November 2006, 22:42
Ah, quality always shines through, SallyAnne. It will make next Friday all the more welcome. What's a good night out for you then?

It's working wonders. I can feel my toes curling as that warming liquid works its Friday evening magic. Just hoping my boy doesn't get me up too early in the morning.


A special night out for me would be going to a gorgeous English restaurant (mmmm Lamb), then curling up in one of those high back old leather chairs in front of a fire with a couple of bottles of very expensive red wine. Theres a great place up here called Lumley Castle - it lets you do that all night (for a very modest fee (for an IT contractor anyway!))

But to be honest, I'm more than happy sitting in a spit and sawdust pub from 12 o'clock getting more and more drunk with the more "normal" folk of the world.

My idea of hell these days is busy towny bars though - thats one of the reasons I moved out of Newcastle...I'm well past all that crazy party bar thing. Heard all of the patter, experienced all of the madness - now I just like good company and good fun.

How old is your son? Is he your pride and joy? :)

Lucifer Box
10th November 2006, 23:04
Crickey, SallyAnne, have you been following me around recently? You have neatly summed up my thoughts on an evening's revelry. I've done all the towny stuff to death and like nothing more than a nice relaxing evening, good company, good chat, and a hedonistic experience all around. Give me a corner boozer and half a dozen decent pints over a flashy bar every day.

For a fabulous feast of English cooking I like to go to Simpsons. Their jugged hare is to die for and they serve up a mean bottle of St Emilion.

Do you like to cook yourself? It's one of my passions. Did some lovely lamb shanks in a rich, charred vegetable sauce earlier in the week. If you like lamb. I think you would have liked this. Oh so many passions and so little time!

My lad is eight and a bit months old and, of course, I love him to bits. He's just started crawling with a vengeance and is into everything. He found his way into the fireplace this morning (not lit, I hasten to add) and came out covered head to foot in soot. So cute.

SallyAnne
10th November 2006, 23:12
Crickey, SallyAnne, have you been following me around recently? You have neatly summed up my thoughts on an evening's revelry. I've done all the towny stuff to death and like nothing more than a nice relaxing evening, good company, good chat, and a hedonistic experience all around. Give me a corner boozer and half a dozen decent pints over a flashy bar every day.

For a fabulous feast of English cooking I like to go to Simpsons. Their jugged hare is to die for and they serve up a mean bottle of St Emilion.

Do you like to cook yourself? It's one of my passions. Did some lovely lamb shanks in a rich, charred vegetable sauce earlier in the week. If you like lamb. I think you would have liked this. Oh so many passions and so little time!

My lad is eight and a bit months old and, of course, I love him to bits. He's just started crawling with a vengeance and is into everything. He found his way into the fireplace this morning (not lit, I hasten to add) and came out covered head to foot in soot. So cute.


ha ha - excellent :) I would absolutely love to have kids - I reckon they'd keep you amused for the rest of your life! That must've been really sweet :) I hope you had the video camera out!

Where is Simpsons then? That London? Me and the other half are coming down for a few days in December (staying at the Sanderson no less!) Its my birthday treat - I'd love to squeeze in a really posh meal somewhere, in between all the Molly Mog boozing time!

I'd love to be able to cook, cause (and I'm pleased the board is empty) I love spending time in the kitchen. Always have. But unfortunately I'm rubbish at it! I made Lasagne on Tuesday night for my bloke coming in - it looked gorgeous and I was very proud of myself...until we ate it and the lasagne sheets were rock hard.

Your lady must be chuffed to bits having a fella who can cook. If I had to choose all over again I'd definately choose a chef as my bloke....or a male hairdresser!

stackpole
11th November 2006, 15:07
Your very busy on here Sallyann, chatting up the lads into the earlies. Doesn't that makkem honey of yours pay you enough attention or something? I've heard blokes are a bit like that Up North.

SallyAnne
11th November 2006, 15:38
Your very busy on here Sallyann, chatting up the lads into the earlies. Doesn't that makkem honey of yours pay you enough attention or something? I've heard blokes are a bit like that Up North.


I dont chat up the lads :) Its just a bit of banter - its very addictive this site! I'm going to have to start rashioning myself with it I think.

I dont want to make him sound like a stereotypical bloke, but he was out with his mates last night, and now he's at the footy :) Wouldn't have it any other way!

Lucifer Box
11th November 2006, 15:54
ha ha - excellent :) I would absolutely love to have kids - I reckon they'd keep you amused for the rest of your life! That must've been really sweet :) I hope you had the video camera out!

Where is Simpsons then? That London? Me and the other half are coming down for a few days in December (staying at the Sanderson no less!) Its my birthday treat - I'd love to squeeze in a really posh meal somewhere, in between all the Molly Mog boozing time!

I'd love to be able to cook, cause (and I'm pleased the board is empty) I love spending time in the kitchen. Always have. But unfortunately I'm rubbish at it! I made Lasagne on Tuesday night for my bloke coming in - it looked gorgeous and I was very proud of myself...until we ate it and the lasagne sheets were rock hard.

Your lady must be chuffed to bits having a fella who can cook. If I had to choose all over again I'd definately choose a chef as my bloke....or a male hairdresser!
Kids are great, well this one is anyway, even at 5am on a Saturday morning when all they want to do is play, play, play and all you want to do is sleep. Best make the best of them while they're young as I'm sure those teenage strops will come around all too quickly.

Yes, Simpson's (http://www.fairmont.com/svy/simpsons/) is in London and is on the Strand. It is the high temple of British cooking and I highly recommend it for afficionados of the best of British. It would make a splendid venue for an evening out. Try and get one of the booths on the right hand wall in the Grand Divan if you can. Your man will need to wear and jacket and tie.

A great alternative would be a visit to Bentley's (http://www.bentleys.org/home/), just off Piccadilly, another long standing feature of the British eating scene in the capital. The focus here is on seafood rather than on the meat oriented menu at Simpson's. Both are delicious, have been serving happy customers for over 250 years between the two of them, and have the highest personal recommendation from me so it's just down to what you fancy.

For pre-dinner cocktails, don't mess around and get yourself over to The American Bar (http://www.fairmont.com/FA/en/CDA/Home/Hotels/Facilities/CDRestaurantDetail/0,1130,facility%25255Fcode%253DREST%252B%2526prope rty%25255Fcd%253DSVY%2526property%25255Fseq%253D10 0144%2526facility%25255Fseq%253D36185803,00.html) at the Savoy. Be there promptly to get one of the sofas and enjoy.

Dr Lucifer dons his chef's hat and says you need to par-boil your lasagne sheets. Of course, you could always make your own. It isn't hard and they taste so much better. Practice makes perfect (or perfect makes practice as my French master always used to say) and no one ever learned anything by getting it right all the time.

To be honest, I don't think my wife really cares what she gets on her plate. Her family upbringing was unfortunately one where mealtimes were something to be gotten out of the way quickly so you could go back to watching the TV. I do do all the cooking though because I like to eat well, so I hope she enjoys that aspect of it at least! I'm sure she does. In my fantasy world I would have been a chef, but I realise that is hopelessly idealistic as except for a tiny handful it is hard work, long hours and low pay, all of which are anathema to me!

SallyAnne
11th November 2006, 16:04
Kids are great, well this one is anyway, even at 5am on a Saturday morning when all they want to do is play, play, play and all you want to do is sleep. Best make the best of them while they're young as I'm sure those teenage strops will come around all too quickly.

Yes, Simpson's (http://www.fairmont.com/svy/simpsons/) is in London and is on the Strand. It is the high temple of British cooking and I highly recommend it for afficionados of the best of British. It would make a splendid venue for an evening out. Try and get one of the booths on the right hand wall in the Grand Divan if you can. Your man will need to wear and jacket and tie.

A great alternative would be a visit to Bentley's (http://www.bentleys.org/home/), just off Piccadilly, another long standing feature of the British eating scene in the capital. The focus here is on seafood rather than on the meat oriented menu at Simpson's. Both are delicious, have been serving happy customers for over 250 years between the two of them, and have the highest personal recommendation from me so it's just down to what you fancy.

For pre-dinner cocktails, don't mess around and get yourself over to The American Bar (http://www.fairmont.com/FA/en/CDA/Home/Hotels/Facilities/CDRestaurantDetail/0,1130,facility%25255Fcode%253DREST%252B%2526prope rty%25255Fcd%253DSVY%2526property%25255Fseq%253D10 0144%2526facility%25255Fseq%253D36185803,00.html) at the Savoy. Be there promptly to get one of the sofas and enjoy.

Dr Lucifer dons his chef's hat and says you need to par-boil your lasagne sheets. Of course, you could always make your own. It isn't hard and they taste so much better. Practice makes perfect (or perfect makes practice as my French master always used to say) and no one ever learned anything by getting it right all the time.

To be honest, I don't think my wife really cares what she gets on her plate. Her family upbringing was unfortunately one where mealtimes were something to be gotten out of the way quickly so you could go back to watching the TV. I do do all the cooking though because I like to eat well, so I hope she enjoys that aspect of it at least! I'm sure she does. In my fantasy world I would have been a chef, but I realise that is hopelessly idealistic as except for a tiny handful it is hard work, long hours and low pay, all of which are anathema to me!


Ah wow - thanks Lucifer. You are a helpful devil! Thats really nice of you for all those links.

I will go and do some investigating now......

Cheers honey.

Lucifer Box
11th November 2006, 16:08
Ah wow - thanks Lucifer. You are a helpful devil! Thats really nice of you for all those links.

I will go and do some investigating now......

Cheers honey.
You're welcome! Glad to be of service. :)

Hope you find something you like the look of in that lot. Needless to say, with both restaurants you should book as far in advance as you can and it helps if you are flexible with date and time at weekends.

Almost forgot, if you want a decent boozer in central London, you won't go far wrong with the Argyll Arms (http://www.pubs.com/pub_details.cfm?ID=149), just off Oxford Circus. Looks exactly as it did 100 years ago.

lilelvis2000
13th November 2006, 10:04
My lad is eight and a bit months old and, of course, I love him to bits. He's just started crawling with a vengeance and is into everything. He found his way into the fireplace this morning (not lit, I hasten to add) and came out covered head to foot in soot. So cute.

Eight months, crikey, that's fairly quick. Mind you my lad (13 months) started crawling backwards at that age. Managed to get himself stuck under the couch. hee hee. Started crawling forwards "commando" style - arms only. But now he rockets around with aid of his truck. and in the kitchen he uses the bin - sliding it around on the tiled floor. very cute.

has yours started throwing stuff just to hear the sound it makes?

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 10:08
Eight months, crikey, that's fairly quick. Mind you my lad (13 months) started crawling backwards at that age. Managed to get himself stuck under the couch. hee hee. Started crawling forwards "commando" style - arms only. But now he rockets around with aid of his truck. and in the kitchen he uses the bin - sliding it around on the tiled floor. very cute.

has yours started throwing stuff just to hear the sound it makes?
He was pushing himself backwards in circles at about 6 months which was very cute to see. Anything that comes within reach now he pulls himself up on it so I think he might be tottering fairly soon which will be time to turn the house upside down nightmare time.

Yes he's throwing stuff under my desk as I type. Bugger, I think it was the router.

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 10:09
Bad news, LB.

You've got the Terrible Twos to get through first...

"No"

"No"

"Won't"

"No"

etc.

HTH.
I think I'll be alright, Zeity, dealing with Mrs Lucifer has given plenty of expertise in dealing with that sort of scenario.

We do seem to be getting through nannies at a rate of knots though. And they do so love little Damien when they first see him.

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 10:14
It must get tedious cutting them down...
We had to get one out from under the ice in the water feature last week. That was most tiresome.

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 10:15
Excellent, LB.

I see you are starting the chimney cleaning training in good time... :cool:
It's either that or scientific research. I run a strict household based on the school of hard knocks principle.

Ardesco
13th November 2006, 13:01
Eight months, crikey, that's fairly quick. Mind you my lad (13 months) started crawling backwards at that age. Managed to get himself stuck under the couch. hee hee. Started crawling forwards "commando" style - arms only. But now he rockets around with aid of his truck. and in the kitchen he uses the bin - sliding it around on the tiled floor. very cute.

has yours started throwing stuff just to hear the sound it makes?

Our little monster took his first steps at 11 months and was into everything from that point onwards. The biggest thing to get your head round once they start walking is that putting things on a table is no longer safe. Our little monster was grabbing a stool and climbing up to reach everything at about 13 months...

Best tip I could offer is never give them sweets. We never gave ours any sweets at all until he was about 18 months old and he is actually very good with them now and says no to them if he is full (a shock indeed!!). However you can really see the difference in behaviour once he has eaten them, he is totally off the walls... :)

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 13:07
I never eat sweets so no need for my lad to either. :)

SallyAnne
13th November 2006, 13:10
I never eat sweets so no need for my lad to either. :)


You cruel sod! :)

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 13:12
You cruel sod! :)
Chico doesn't think I'm an embodiment of the devil for nothing.

SallyAnne
13th November 2006, 13:27
Chico doesn't think I'm an embodiment of the devil for nothing.


Ha ha - you could have just ended that sentence after the word think!

Lucy
13th November 2006, 13:31
I never eat sweets so no need for my lad to either. :)

Have you never eaten sweets LB ?

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 13:31
Ha ha - you could have just ended that sentence after the word think!
:rollin:

To true, he has a loose collective of websites that do his thinking for him.

Old timers will remember the hilarious instance when the cut 'n' paste king posted a lengthy article "definitively proving his argument. Next." that in fact argued completely the opposite point.

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 13:34
Have you never eaten sweets LB ?
Oh yes, plenty, but I am weak, so very very weak. If I had sweets, biscuits, crisps, what have you in the house I wouldn't rest until I had scoffed the lot. One catering pack of Jaffa Cakes is just never enough you see. So my answer is just never to buy any.

I'm sure I read that in some parenting book somewhere too. The best way to ensure your children don't eat crap is not to buy any.

Lucifer in "responsible parenting of the Third Reich" mode.

lilelvis2000
13th November 2006, 13:46
Our little monster took his first steps at 11 months and was into everything from that point onwards. The biggest thing to get your head round once they start walking is that putting things on a table is no longer safe. Our little monster was grabbing a stool and climbing up to reach everything at about 13 months...

Best tip I could offer is never give them sweets. We never gave ours any sweets at all until he was about 18 months old and he is actually very good with them now and says no to them if he is full (a shock indeed!!). However you can really see the difference in behaviour once he has eaten them, he is totally off the walls... :)

We try and keep him on organic veggies and fruits. Dunno if it will make a difference in the end...but so far he hasn't had a single sweet thing. And the nursery cook from scratch the snacks which the kids get to eat - which can only be good.

His favorite thing to do is to say "ta ta" to everyone leaving through a door. Its really cute and he can tell the difference between entering and leaving. Another cute thing is he says "TA!" when you hand him something. aaaawww
But when he gets going walking with his truck...he can do it all day. without a nap. Meaning I get home to a very tired and upset baby.

monkeyboy
13th November 2006, 13:54
Oh yes, plenty, but I am weak, so very very weak. If I had sweets, biscuits, crisps, what have you in the house I wouldn't rest until I had scoffed the lot. One catering pack of Jaffa Cakes is just never enough you see. So my answer is just never to buy any.

I'm sure I read that in some parenting book somewhere too. The best way to ensure your children don't eat crap is not to buy any.

Lucifer in "responsible parenting of the Third Reich" mode.

Are you my wife by any chance????

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 13:57
Are you my wife by any chance????
Yes, and you're in big trouble when you get home.

monkeyboy
13th November 2006, 14:08
Promises Promises

Ardesco
13th November 2006, 14:12
We try and keep him on organic veggies and fruits. Dunno if it will make a difference in the end...but so far he hasn't had a single sweet thing. And the nursery cook from scratch the snacks which the kids get to eat - which can only be good.

His favorite thing to do is to say "ta ta" to everyone leaving through a door. Its really cute and he can tell the difference between entering and leaving. Another cute thing is he says "TA!" when you hand him something. aaaawww
But when he gets going walking with his truck...he can do it all day. without a nap. Meaning I get home to a very tired and upset baby.

I must say that i don't buy into all this organic rubbish personally. I ate genetically modified fruit and veg most of my life and there is nothing wrong with me!! (The third eye can be quite useful at times..). Also some organic food has more toxins in it than genetically modified as you have to throw more pesticides around to ensure you have a viable crop....

Ardesco
13th November 2006, 15:12
You are telling me that they can grow entire crops of this stuff without using pesticides and still harvest enough to make it finacially viable? If so no farmer would be using pesticides as they cost a bloody fortune....

DaveB
13th November 2006, 15:24
You are telling me that they can grow entire crops of this stuff without using pesticides and still harvest enough to make it finacially viable? If so no farmer would be using pesticides as they cost a bloody fortune....

Yep. Why do you think organic products command a premium. The cost of using persticides and other chemicals is more than offset by the increase in yields that they produce. Even after using them crop yields are such that non-organic produce can be sold cheaper than organic and still make a profit.

This is why most of our food is high volume product of dubious provenance. This goes even more so for Organic/Non-organic meat.

The Soil Association regulate the organic industry with a very strict certification scheme including inspections and licensing proceedures. You cannot use the word Organic in your product or business name without being certified by them.

An no, you can't just stop using chemicals and call it organic. The land farmed has to be chemical free for 4 years ( IIRC ) before you can claim crops grown on it are organic, although you can claim the be "Organic conversion in progress" and be licensed for that in the meantime.

There are a total of 4 chemicals that organic producers are allowed to use "as a last resort" but they are based on natural substances such as Copper, Sulpher, Soft soap and Derris. This compares to over 350 legal pesticides and other chemicals available to non-organic farmers.

Ardesco
13th November 2006, 15:33
I'm probably getting my arguments mixed up between organic and non-gm :rolleyes:

lilelvis2000
13th November 2006, 16:10
I'm probably getting my arguments mixed up between organic and non-gm :rolleyes:

yup. Correct me if I'm wrong but most GM is done to make them more resistant to insects and diseases, so potentially you could use less/none chemicals on them. Then again some GM products are made by pesticide companies so that they don't absorb the pesticide.

I'd rather my son wasn't having oranges with a coating on them. apples with the same and almost anything else these days. I hear there is organic cow's milk...is that true?

DaveB
13th November 2006, 16:45
I'd rather my son wasn't having oranges with a coating on them. apples with the same and almost anything else these days. I hear there is organic cow's milk...is that true?

Yes there is. Sainsburys sell it as well as some of the other supermarkets I think.

hyperD
13th November 2006, 20:17
To be honest, I don't think my wife really cares what she gets on her plate. Her family upbringing was unfortunately one where mealtimes were something to be gotten out of the way quickly so you could go back to watching the TV. I do do all the cooking though because I like to eat well, so I hope she enjoys that aspect of it at least! I'm sure she does. In my fantasy world I would have been a chef, but I realise that is hopelessly idealistic as except for a tiny handful it is hard work, long hours and low pay, all of which are anathema to me!

Just catching up and this caught my eye LB: snap! Wife's childhood mealtimes were associated with suffering at the table from her authoritarian "eat your greens, I don't care if it takes all evening" father. Consequently, mealtimes become a manic whirlwind of elaborate fencing cut-and-thrust dans sa bouche maneuvres with the cutlery to minimise exposure to the dining experience.

However, she's beginning to enjoy food more and is starting to take her time a little more.

And the Argyll arms - used to go there regularly in 1989/1990/1991. Great pub.

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 20:21
Ah, hyperD, my old friend. Looks like we really were twins separated at birth. Yes, when I first met Mrs Lucifer she ate as though someone was going to come along and snatch her food off her. Cram it down as quick as you can so you can get onto something else more interesting. Meantime I was still twirling my first canape. It has improved somewhat on that front but still she'd be just as happy with a bowl of porridge.

Got the first jerusalem artichokes of the season at the weekend - they make fabulous soup!

Agreed, The Argyll Arms is always my drinking establishment of choice in central London.

SallyAnne
13th November 2006, 20:30
Ah, hyperD, my old friend. Looks like we really were twins separated at birth. Yes, when I first met Mrs Lucifer she ate as though someone was going to come along and snatch her food off her. Cram it down as quick as you can so you can get onto something else more interesting. Meantime I was still twirling my first canape. It has improved somewhat on that front but still she'd be just as happy with a bowl of porridge.

Got the first jerusalem artichokes of the season at the weekend - they make fabulous soup!

Agreed, The Argyll Arms is always my drinking establishment of choice in central London.


I'm divided now....
I'm unsure whether to be completely jealous of both your ladies for having such wonderful men who cook for them and not only that, feed them nice healthy, tasty food which you want to enjoy all night! How wonderfully romantic!

Or....call you both a couple of control freaks!! Controlling to the point of making your wives eat in a certain way!!

I'm totally unsure which way to go on this...

hyperD
13th November 2006, 20:54
Good cooking is the path to a woman's soul.

I love cooking - great therapy - and when you get good it doesn't take that long to prepare - and very cheap.

The ony drawback is that you have less takeways because you start to taste alot of the preservatives in the food and not the subtle tastes of vegetables and well hung meat (f'nar).

It's a bit like a ex-smoker tasting food for the first time: nothing but bolus, then slowly over time the flicker of the aromas igniting the tastebuds.

Having seen Bluminmental on the TV, I quite fancy a trip to Bray for the Fat Duck.

I did say to my wife once that she ought to liquidize her MaccyD's to optimise the consuming process.

Jerusalem artichokes - good call LB, I'll hunt some down!

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 21:11
hyperD, you are the master and I am a mere humble apprentice. I've not been to The Fat Duck, but have a long standing agreement to go there with a good mate of mine as soon as we can get our diaries to agree to match up.

To be fair, Mrs Lucifer is always free to have a bowl of porridge for dinner if she wants (and when I'm not at home she invariably does) but as it would involve her making it she tends to settle for what I've prepared instead, and I do always be sure to avoid things she definitely would not like.

However, I would love to do a nice dinner for someone who would really enjoy it.

SallyAnne
13th November 2006, 21:20
You two are going to make me cry :(

I honestly cant remember the last time I had anything cooked for me (unless I ate out obviously).

I came from family where we all sat round the table and made an evening of it, pretty much every night! (My dad made his own wine!) So we spent the entire evening eating (always 3 courses), drinking, good conversation.....it beats watching TV or posting on this site!!
But my other half....I really love him....but he just doesn't get that at all. He wants quick food. Food is a tool to him, not a pleasure.

:(

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 21:27
You two are going to make me cry :(

I honestly cant remember the last time I had anything cooked for me (unless I ate out obviously).

I came from family where we all sat round the table and made an evening of it, pretty much every night! (My dad made his own wine!) So we spent the entire evening eating (always 3 courses), drinking, good conversation.....it beats watching TV or posting on this site!!
But my other half....I really love him....but he just doesn't get that at all. He wants quick food. Food is a tool to him, not a pleasure.

:(
Sounds like my family upbringing. It was a rare evening when dad wouldn't whip out the latest vintage of dandelion or rhubarb wine.

Eating well is food for the soul and as you have to eat you may as well eat well. Mrs Lucifer is just the same as your man though - it's just something you consume to stop you feeling hungry. Tragic. :(

SallyAnne
13th November 2006, 21:29
Sounds like my family upbringing. It was a rare evening when dad wouldn't whip out the latest vintage of dandelion or rhubarb wine.

Eating well is food for the soul and as you have to eat you may as well eat well. Mrs Lucifer is just the same as your man though - it's just something you consume to stop you feeling hungry. Tragic. :(

It surely is.

All this talk has made me hungry now :)

I'm logging off - have a great evening.

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 21:35
It surely is.

All this talk has made me hungry now :)

I'm logging off - have a great evening.
Pop a couple of scallops on the griddle and hyperD will knock up a quick ginger dressing. I'll get out a nicely chilled bottle of Cloudy Bay Sauvignon Blanc 2004.

TTFN. :)

Lucy
13th November 2006, 21:45
That's it we should go to the Fat Duck for our Christmas gathering :D

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 21:45
That's it we should go to the Fat Duck for our Christmas gathering :D
Count me in!

Lucy
13th November 2006, 21:50
Count me in!

So it's just you and me LB !

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 21:53
So it's just you and me LB !
I'll get my people to talk to your people and we'll get something worked out. Remember, no publicity. We don't want paparazzi hanging around in the bushes waiting to catch a glimpse of CUK's finest partaking in a gourmet experience.

Lucy
13th November 2006, 21:56
Oh you are a tease.

And, I always say, the nice boys are always taken.

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 22:17
the nice boys are always taken.
For a ride, perhaps. :D

Lucy
13th November 2006, 22:22
Are you planning on another child LB ? I'm an only child, it's not fun.

SallyAnne
13th November 2006, 22:25
For a ride, perhaps. :D


:rollin:

Lucy
13th November 2006, 22:30
For a ride, perhaps. :D


Are you trying to tell us something LB ?

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 22:32
Are you planning on another child LB ? I'm an only child, it's not fun.
I think it would be nice for the lad to have a sibling, yes. My dad comes from a huge family - he was the eldest of eight - but I think that might be taking things a bit too far.

SallyAnne
13th November 2006, 22:32
Are you trying to tell us something LB ?


I think he's just a very intelligent and clued up man!

Lucifer Box
13th November 2006, 22:34
I think he's just a very intelligent and clued up man!
I'm going to log in here more often!

Lucy
13th November 2006, 22:36
I think he's just a very intelligent and clued up man!

I found him first. :D

SallyAnne
13th November 2006, 22:41
I found him first. :D

I think Mrs Lucifer found him first :)

Lucy
13th November 2006, 22:45
Well indeed, and a lucky woman she is.

He cooks, he child-minds, he is kind, clever and witty...

Lucifer Box
14th November 2006, 06:51
Well thank you very much indeed, ladies, you have quite made my day. If there were a blushing emoticon I would certainly use it. *

I find you both charming, funny, intelligent and delightful fellow posters. It is my priviledge to share a board with you.



* Alexei, this is your cue to moan about the poor standard of the emoticons compared to the old board.

Ardesco
14th November 2006, 08:58
Ah the silver tongue of the devil is at work again. I see you still have it old chap, give him a couple of hours and he will tempt anybody...


:D