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AtW
12th May 2017, 14:35
NHS hospitals across England hit by large-scale cyber-attack

Many hospitals having to divert emergency patients, with doctors reporting messages demanding money

A number of hospitals have been hit by a large scale cyber attack, NHS England has confirmed.

Hospitals across the country appear to have been simultaneously hit by a bug in their IT systems, leading to many diverting emergency patients. NHS England said it was aware of the problem and would release more details soon.

Meanwhile doctors have been posting on Twitter about what has been happening to their systems.

A screen grab of a instant message conversation circulated by one doctor says: “So our hospital is down … We got a message saying your computers are now under their control and pay a certain amount of money. And now everything is gone.”

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/may/12/hospitals-across-england-hit-by-large-scale-cyber-attack

:eek

MeMeMe1966
12th May 2017, 14:41
Even those unaffected have shut down systems with external links as a precautionary measure to prevent further spread of the virus.

I'm typing this on my phone as all hospital wifi down. Everything down. They are using paper forms across the Trust.

NorthWestPerm2Contr
12th May 2017, 14:42
It's ok they just need to find some Contractors who will be paid properly and are clearly not inside IR35.

Oh wait :rolleyes:

northernladyuk
12th May 2017, 14:51
Where's the opportunity, folks?

NorthWestPerm2Contr
12th May 2017, 14:58
I'll fix it for £800/day outside IR35 or £1600/day inside. Your choice guys.

northernladyuk
12th May 2017, 15:00
I'll fix it for £800/day outside IR35 or £1600/day inside. Your choice guys.

AtW will fix it for 0.25 bitcoins per PC.

Paddy
12th May 2017, 15:04
NHS hospitals across England hit by large-scale cyber-attack

Many hospitals having to divert emergency patients, with doctors reporting messages demanding money

A number of hospitals have been hit by a large scale cyber attack, NHS England has confirmed.

Hospitals across the country appear to have been simultaneously hit by a bug in their IT systems, leading to many diverting emergency patients. NHS England said it was aware of the problem and would release more details soon.

Meanwhile doctors have been posting on Twitter about what has been happening to their systems.

A screen grab of a instant message conversation circulated by one doctor says: “So our hospital is down … We got a message saying your computers are now under their control and pay a certain amount of money. And now everything is gone.”

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/may/12/hospitals-across-england-hit-by-large-scale-cyber-attack

:eek

Three years ago I wrote a report about this very vulnerability. In particular there were many (but not all) servers with no virus protection because the in-house IT department reckoned that virus protection was not needed because laptops and desktops were (allegedly) protected. That was just the tip of the iceberg. The rest is of the report was scathing so much so I dare not even hint to how bad their IT system is. However, one problem was that doctors were sharing logins and bringing in games on USB sticks so thy could play around on night-shift.

VectraMan
12th May 2017, 15:06
Some patients are reporting that they're being told they must wait two weeks to see a GP and three months for a referral.

Oh wait.

NorthWestPerm2Contr
12th May 2017, 15:16
AtW will fix it for 0.25 bitcoins per PC.

Shhhh that was our arrangement for a 12 months contract.

NorthWestPerm2Contr
12th May 2017, 15:17
Three years ago I wrote a report about this very vulnerability. In particular there were many (but not all) servers with no virus protection because the in-house IT department reckoned that virus protection was not needed because laptops and desktops were (allegedly) protected. That was just the tip of the iceberg. The rest is of the report was scathing so much so I dare not even hint to how bad their IT system is. However, one problem was that doctors were sharing logins and bringing in games on USB sticks so thy could play around on night-shift.

This is just the start.....

Mordac
12th May 2017, 15:20
Some patients are reporting that they're being told they must wait two weeks to see a GP and three months for a referral.

Oh wait.

So things are improving then...:eyes

oliverson
12th May 2017, 15:23
Some patients are reporting that they're being told they must wait two weeks to see a GP and three months for a referral.

Oh wait.

So, the upside is that it's actually sped up the process?

Hobosapien
12th May 2017, 16:15
BBC reporting it's across Europe and Russia...

Ransomware attacks reported in Europe - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-39901382)


PANIC, IT'S THE START OF WWIII

OR WWZ.

xoggoth
12th May 2017, 17:08
However, one problem was that doctors were sharing logins and bringing in games on USB sticks so thy could play around on night-shift

That's worrying. I hope surgeons aren't playing pokemon go while they're operating. Oh look nurse, I've found pokemon in this chaps's gall bladder.

DimPrawn
12th May 2017, 17:11
A Doctor faces off another Cyber attack!

https://m0vie.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/doctorwho-attackofthecybermen13.jpg

xoggoth
12th May 2017, 17:12
Ransomware attacks reported in Europe - BBC News

Can't be a*sed to check the details but saw summit about a vulnerability in MS allowed a virus to be sent by email and you don't even have to open it.

MarillionFan
12th May 2017, 17:18
BBC reporting it's across Europe and Russia...

Ransomware attacks reported in Europe - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-39901382)


PANIC, IT'S THE START OF WWIII

OR WWZ.


Oh dear. Baba Vanga was right. I'm off to the basement.

http://forums.contractoruk.com/general/121286-juncker-says-english-becoming-less-important-2.html#post2411631

scooterscot
12th May 2017, 17:27
Bitcoin is a poor choice for ransom payment, it can be traced easily enough.

Blockchain would be an excellent use case for keeping NHS records. Encrypted end to end whilst keeping data available across the entire network in multiple nodes.

Andy Hallett
12th May 2017, 19:36
I see on line the NHS have been asked whether the latest Microsoft updates have been applied...... as an earlier post mentioned, stay on XP, this happens!

AtW
12th May 2017, 20:04
Empress made a statement:

• This is not targeted at the NHS, it’s an international attack, says Empress Theresa the First

Phew, thank May for that!

BrilloPad
12th May 2017, 20:21
don't do it? :confused:

While there is strong and stable anti-virus, all will be fine.

MrMarkyMark
12th May 2017, 20:34
don't do it? :confused:


You rang?

http://assets2.heart.co.uk/2011/04/frankie-goes-to-hollywood-1296039156-view-0.jpg

dotcom12
12th May 2017, 21:41
supposedly the criminals only want $300 to turn off the ransomware

AtW
12th May 2017, 21:54
supposedly the criminals only want $300 to turn off the ransomware

Per PC.

And it might get infected again...

NotAllThere
13th May 2017, 04:25
And they're criminals. Not to be trusted. Shame the government decided to deter IT professionals from working in the NHS.

BrilloPad
13th May 2017, 06:17
And they're criminals. Not to be trusted. Shame the government decided to deter IT professionals from working in the NHS.

The government has seen those in IT as glorified typists for at least 30 years. And their hatred of us is increasing.

Its a far bigger danger than Brexit.

Hobosapien
13th May 2017, 06:19
Can't be a*sed to check the details but saw summit about a vulnerability in MS allowed a virus to be sent by email and you don't even have to open it.

Yep, apparently it has a worm capability to spread over an unsecure network without each Windows PC user having to invite it onto the PC by opening an email etc.

Exploit patched since mid March according to news item but I guess not applicable to XP so the vulnerability continues.

Should be even more legacy work migrating systems from old no-longer supported MS products now. :smokin

BrilloPad
13th May 2017, 06:23
This would never have happened if they had used macs.

NF

woohoo
13th May 2017, 06:26
BBC had a security expert on breakfast, sounded like a clueless idiot. If this is the standard of security consultant I'm thinking of getting into this racket.

Hobosapien
13th May 2017, 06:26
Bitcoin is a poor choice for ransom payment, it can be traced easily enough.

Blockchain would be an excellent use case for keeping NHS records. Encrypted end to end whilst keeping data available across the entire network in multiple nodes.


Even if it was hard to trace, the sudden worldwide demand/shortage for bitcoins to pay the ransom will point to the perp(s) who surely would have stocked up on bitcoins to sell at a surging mark-up to the desperadoes, so they get the cash from the bitcoin sale then get the bitcoins back when the ransom is paid. :smokin

I suppose rather than the perp(s) plan not working due to not enough bitcoins available to unlock all the affected machines in time, it won't work due to all affected having a disaster recovery plan that includes restoring from backups. Presuming there's no known bug/exploit in the ransomware that allows the files to be unlocked without paying up first.

SueEllen
13th May 2017, 07:05
BBC had a security expert on breakfast, sounded like a clueless idiot. If this is the standard of security consultant I'm thinking of getting into this racket.

Newsnight had a hacker guy on who had a previous criminal conviction.

The guy looked pissed off while the "experts" were talking. He then made the point that it wasn't a genius who caused it.

Paddy
13th May 2017, 07:34
Empress made a statement:

• This is not targeted at the NHS, it’s an international attack, says Empress Theresa the First

Phew, thank May for that!

The code for the Trojan was developed by the NSA and stolen from employees.
HMG should sue the NSA for negligence.

Those affected were not properly protected with AV and MS updates.
Those badly affected are the ones without backups or those who have never tested their backups. Many of these failed systems are contracted out to the well-known third party companies. No doubt companies like *** Group will have disclaimers in small print at the back of their glossy brochures.

Drei
13th May 2017, 08:00
All of this because someone wanted to download naked pictures of Anna Kournikova eh?

I can definitely confirm what Paddy mentioned in another post, that the NHS IT Systems are a joke, the people they employ and outsource it to have no idea what they are doing. The NHS is a tight closed club, no one from the outside can join hence why they will NEVER get experts working for them.

I remember interviewing for a contract deploying a specific piece of software. I worked for the company that developed this, I had their training and knew how to tackle any of the issues that they will get and they will get plenty. I did not get the gig because "I did not have enough NHS Trust engagement experience". Like that is something that you can call "experience". They are so up their own a$$ that they cannot comprehend that someone from the private sector would be able to understand their lingo and processes in 1 day.

Lets be honest the contractors working for the NHS prior to the IR35 fiasco were all part of the club, I don't think any of them have worked anywhere else but the NHS for decades so they wouldn't have any expert advice even if they did not implement the in IR35 bullS... that's all they did because these are easy cushy jobs and can get paid up to £1500 a day. I know a few directors on contracts getting that much a day. What they do no idea because I see no improvements whatsoever.

DimPrawn
13th May 2017, 09:33
Yep, apparently it has a worm capability to spread over an unsecure network without each Windows PC user having to invite it onto the PC by opening an email etc.

Exploit patched since mid March according to news item but I guess not applicable to XP so the vulnerability continues.

Should be even more legacy work migrating systems from old no-longer supported MS products now. :smokin

I wonder if this would help or was even installed?

https://www.avast.com/windows-xp-antivirus

Windows XP® Security | Windows XP Antivirus | Kaspersky Lab (http://windows.kaspersky.com/xp-security)

etc.

SueEllen
13th May 2017, 09:36
Yep, apparently it has a worm capability to spread over an unsecure network without each Windows PC user having to invite it onto the PC by opening an email etc.

Exploit patched since mid March according to news item but I guess not applicable to XP so the vulnerability continues.

Should be even more legacy work migrating systems from old no-longer supported MS products now. :smokin

M$ has now allowed XP and OS above but unsupported to be patched.

Case of closing the stable door after the horse has bolted.

AtW
13th May 2017, 13:39
The code for the Trojan was developed by the NSA and stolen from employees.
HMG should sue the NSA for negligence.

Those affected were not properly protected with AV and MS updates.
Those badly affected are the ones without backups or those who have never tested their backups. Many of these failed systems are contracted out to the well-known third party companies. No doubt companies like *** Group will have disclaimers in small print at the back of their glossy brochures.

Exploits wre NSA, they were stolen by GRU - released by Wikileaks who are GRU front, then in way too dhort time this GRU virus appears ... sue NSA?

Running XP is negligent

AtW
13th May 2017, 14:04
Oh btw, it was accused rapist Julian Assange who released the data via Wikileaks, he is holed up in Ecuadorign Embassy, me thinking it's good time to tell them that they have to change location of embassy ASAP...

MarillionFan
13th May 2017, 15:59
Global cyber-attack: Security blogger halts ransomware 'by accident' - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-39907049)

This is brilliant.

BrilloPad
13th May 2017, 18:30
All of this because someone wanted to download naked pictures of Anna Kournikova eh?

I can definitely confirm what Paddy mentioned in another post, that the NHS IT Systems are a joke, the people they employ and outsource it to have no idea what they are doing. The NHS is a tight closed club, no one from the outside can join hence why they will NEVER get experts working for them.

I remember interviewing for a contract deploying a specific piece of software. I worked for the company that developed this, I had their training and knew how to tackle any of the issues that they will get and they will get plenty. I did not get the gig because "I did not have enough NHS Trust engagement experience". Like that is something that you can call "experience". They are so up their own a$$ that they cannot comprehend that someone from the private sector would be able to understand their lingo and processes in 1 day.

Lets be honest the contractors working for the NHS prior to the IR35 fiasco were all part of the club, I don't think any of them have worked anywhere else but the NHS for decades so they wouldn't have any expert advice even if they did not implement the in IR35 bullS... that's all they did because these are easy cushy jobs and can get paid up to £1500 a day. I know a few directors on contracts getting that much a day. What they do no idea because I see no improvements whatsoever.

Alot of government is like that. ESpecially in Wales.

SimonMac
13th May 2017, 19:15
And they're criminals. Not to be trusted. Shame the government decided to deter IT professionals from working in the NHS.

Hang on, it wasn't just the NHS that was attacked, many private sector organisations (FedEx, Renualt and Deutsche Bahn naming some) were infected too, only the NHS ones made the news

PurpleGorilla
13th May 2017, 19:43
Life saving operations being postponed - early test results delayed. That's big news.

BigRed
13th May 2017, 21:57
Alot of government is like that. ESpecially in Wales.

And Banks, pay top dollar, we're special, etc. they have rubbish UIs, fragmented systems, poor security and are decades out of date.

seeourbee
14th May 2017, 08:20
Three years ago I wrote a report about this very vulnerability. In particular there were many (but not all) servers with no virus protection because the in-house IT department reckoned that virus protection was not needed because laptops and desktops were (allegedly) protected. That was just the tip of the iceberg. The rest is of the report was scathing so much so I dare not even hint to how bad their IT system is. However, one problem was that doctors were sharing logins and bringing in games on USB sticks so thy could play around on night-shift.

If that is true you need to send it in now. Send it to me I have contacts that want to see this.

Andy Hallett
15th May 2017, 06:59
What with this, IR35 and GDPR the big four will be literally printing money this year.

BlasterBates
15th May 2017, 07:14
I use Linux at home and work. I have an older Laptop with Windows 7 but it will remain switched off for the week, it's all backed up anyway.

SueEllen
15th May 2017, 08:59
I use Linux at home and work. I have an older Laptop with Windows 7 but it will remain switched off for the week, it's all backed up anyway.

:confused:

There are patches available for windows 7.

uk contractor
15th May 2017, 10:14
Nice little earner for eerrr indooors once the government release the funds for the upgrades....shame NHS is such a closed shop! Watch the job boards for an urgent requirement for 500 migration specialists with SC or willing to undergo it!!

Hobosapien
15th May 2017, 10:45
What with this, IR35 and GDPR the big four will be literally printing money this year.


Maybe time to expand it to the 'big five' via a CUK guild. No need for CVs or interviews, just check the post history to gauge how useful each contractor would be and their ideal roles. :smokin

northernladyuk
15th May 2017, 10:50
Maybe time to expand it to the 'big five' via a CUK guild. No need for CVs or interviews, just check the post history to gauge how useful each contractor would be and their ideal roles. :smokin

I vote for originalPM to project manage and suity to do the grunt work. Then the rest of us will clear up the mess.

Paddy
15th May 2017, 10:52
If that is true you need to send it in now. Send it to me I have contacts that want to see this.


Under what grounds would you and your contact be entitled to an internal NHS report? I am sure the DM would pay good money for a leaked copy.



Nice little earner for eerrr indooors once the government release the funds for the upgrades....shame NHS is such a closed shop! Watch the job boards for an urgent requirement for 500 migration specialists with SC or willing to undergo it!!

Any such work will be outsourced which is a pity because how ever bad their IT support is, it will be much worse and more costly outsourced.

seeourbee
15th May 2017, 10:56
Well stop bragging about it then and faux-leaking sound bites. I now suspect this "report" is not what you say and a pure fiction.

Bluenose
15th May 2017, 15:41
my 50p is that even if the NHS desktops were running the latest and greatest, they would not have been patched in time anyway.

I expect that many highly funded privately run IT departments were quietly patching their systems over the weekend (cough).

It is great to hear that the NHS back-office systems appear to have been un-scathed, well done there.

Even if the NHS desktops were running Linux and VDI'ing into scratch desktops they would have still been hit however and it would have been easier to contain. The downside is that it is generally hideously expensive to do it this way.

The bigger story here for me is how long Microsoft left the hole un-patched to allow whomever to exploit it.

SueEllen
15th May 2017, 15:43
The bigger story here for me is how long Microsoft left the hole un-patched to allow whomever to exploit it.

Windows XP is unsupported.

M$ sent patches out in March to stop the issue.

AtW
15th May 2017, 16:20
Windows XP is unsupported.

It should be illegal for them to just "not support" it for important security patches

vetran
15th May 2017, 16:22
my 50p is that even if the NHS desktops were running the latest and greatest, they would not have been patched in time anyway.

I expect that many highly funded privately run IT departments were quietly patching their systems over the weekend (cough).

It is great to hear that the NHS back-office systems appear to have been un-scathed, well done there.

Even if the NHS desktops were running Linux and VDI'ing into scratch desktops they would have still been hit however and it would have been easier to contain. The downside is that it is generally hideously expensive to do it this way.

The bigger story here for me is how long Microsoft left the hole un-patched to allow whomever to exploit it.

XP has been unsupported (except embedded) for years. Windows 7 roll out was 6 years ago for most sensible companies.

Though probably there were plenty of private organisations updating machines they have to be mad to still run XP.

This is a CIO level issue, they failed to drive the upgrade and prevent risk.

Microsoft tend not to patch EOL O/Ss.

vetran
15th May 2017, 16:23
It should be illegal for them to just "not support" it for important security patches

You send ex customers up to date reports for free?

Bluenose
15th May 2017, 16:54
Windows XP is unsupported.

M$ sent patches out in March to stop the issue.

I know that.

I am supporter of Microsoft, I think their hearts are generally in the right place even if sometimes the quality of their products lets them down time to time.

My point is the NSA exploit was being used well before March. The exploit may have been in the code since it was released in 2002.

Just because it was Windows XP is missing my point, I would rate the chances of Microsoft only knowing about this hole in February as near to zero.

Taken into this context Microsoft defecting the issue onto companies because their software is out of date is a bit galling because it is actually a distraction tactic.

AtW
15th May 2017, 17:15
You send ex customers up to date reports for free?

I would have if we sold on the basis of one off fee for a lifetime license - like Microsoft did...

More importantly - our software does not create potentially dangerous situation for critical infrastructure: Microsoft's does, there is a downside to having market dominance and that should be fixing critical security even for "old" software like XP.

DimPrawn
15th May 2017, 17:18
I would have if we sold on the basis of one off fee for a lifetime license - like Microsoft did...

More importantly - our software does not create potentially dangerous situation for critical infrastructure: Microsoft's does, there is a downside to having market dominance and that should be fixing critical security even for "old" software like XP.

Microsoft should send an automatic update that deletes XP from any computer running it. Sorted. :smile

AtW
15th May 2017, 18:52
Microsoft should send an automatic update that deletes XP from any computer running it. Sorted. :smile

Turning dangerous unpached PCs off the Internet is essential - ISPs should be blocking all access other than to Microsoft patch servers.

Hobosapien
16th May 2017, 09:16
They just need to change the malware code to send out the patch to all the machines that the malware could infect. :smokin

nigelbb
17th May 2017, 09:52
There are two issues here.

The immediate one is that the IT departments of many NHS Trusts had not applied the available patches. This is negligence on a colossal scale & heads should roll.

The second more strategic issue is using general purpose Windows computers & mixing up essential clinical systems like X-ray, pathology, patient admin etc with email & web surfing. The core clinical systems should be isolated from the Internet & run on emdedded devices not prone to malware & viruses.

The whole mess is compounded by the fact that there is no NHS IT system just a fragmented Balkanised mish mash of systems in over 200 Trusts with no thought to strategic design or economies of scale.

BrilloPad
17th May 2017, 09:54
Labour knows how to fix it. Diane Abbott wants to upgrade to windows nine and three quarters.

Drei
18th May 2017, 16:32
There are two issues here.

The immediate one is that the IT departments of many NHS Trusts had not applied the available patches. This is negligence on a colossal scale & heads should roll.

The second more strategic issue is using general purpose Windows computers & mixing up essential clinical systems like X-ray, pathology, patient admin etc with email & web surfing. The core clinical systems should be isolated from the Internet & run on emdedded devices not prone to malware & viruses.

The whole mess is compounded by the fact that there is no NHS IT system just a fragmented Balkanised mish mash of systems in over 200 Trusts with no thought to strategic design or economies of scale.


You forgot to mention that that the NHS is using XP machines with 14 inches monitors which are no longer supported by Microsoft and only supported by local IT teams. I believe (correct me if I am wrong) that the NHS did not want to pay Microsoft what they wanted in order to have XP machines supported. They mostly use antiquated computers except for giving iphones and ipads to every manager, many getting replaced 2 or 3 times in a matter of months.



Like I mentioned in my earlier post, each trust is slightly different but the bottom line is that they really are a closed club no matter what other say (read the contractoruk news post): http://www.contractoruk.com/news/0010983why_it_contractors_should_look_again_nhs.ht ml

You would be very very lucky to get an offer coming from outside the NHS sector. The hiring manager would have to be extremely open minded. Many many times you will end up interviewing for roles which have already been offered to NHS experienced contractors but they still have to conduct the interviews for the sake of following protocol.

I am not writing this because I did not get the role of implementing a clinical system for a London Trust on which I had specific training and experience only to be told not enough NHS experience. But because at the same time I also interviewed for another role at a South England Trust for a clinical system which was similar to the one I had experience on, and they did offer me the role even though I did not have enough NHS experience nor specific system experience. Funny thing is London Trust was paying a lot less than the one outside London. Unfortunately I had to turn it down as the commute would have been a killer.


The other issue is that once you contract in the NHS many private sector companies would not touch you with a barge-pole.

NotAllThere
18th May 2017, 16:35
You forgot that the NHS is using XP machines with 14 inches monitors which are no longer supported by Microsoft and only supported by local IT teams. I believe the NHS did not want to pay Microsoft what they wanted in order to have XP machines covered.No. It was the health minister at the time.

OwlHoot
18th May 2017, 16:41
They just need to change the malware code to send out the patch to all the machines that the malware could infect. :smokin

Great example of lateral thinking - Set a thief to catch a thief! :D

The only snag is the NHS would have to send a memo to all their staff saying "Just this once, you must click on the link in this dodgy looking email!" :laugh

Hobosapien
18th May 2017, 16:51
Great example of lateral thinking - Set a thief to catch a thief! :D

The only snag is the NHS would have to send a memo to all their staff saying "Just this once, you must click on the link in this dodgy looking email!" :laugh


For 'they' I meant Microsoft, but yes I suppose you are still correct. :grin

It's even simpler than that, no need to click emails as the vulnerability in unpatched machines allows the malware through via the network, no user interaction required.

SeanT
18th May 2017, 17:04
No. It was the health minister at the time.

Seen this mentioned elsewhere. Do you have a reference for this?

Paddy
18th May 2017, 17:20
You forgot to mention that that the NHS is using XP machines with 14 inches monitors which are no longer supported by Microsoft and only supported by local IT teams. I believe (correct me if I am wrong) that the NHS did not want to pay Microsoft what they wanted in order to have XP machines supported. They mostly use antiquated computers except for giving iphones and ipads to every manager, many getting replaced 2 or 3 times in a matter of months.



Like I mentioned in my earlier post, each trust is slightly different but the bottom line is that they really are a closed club no matter what other say (read the contractoruk news post): Why IT contractors should look again at the NHS :: Contractor UK (http://www.contractoruk.com/news/0010983why_it_contractors_should_look_again_nhs.ht ml)

You would be very very lucky to get an offer coming from outside the NHS sector. The hiring manager would have to be extremely open minded. Many many times you will end up interviewing for roles which have already been offered to NHS experienced contractors but they still have to conduct the interviews for the sake of following protocol.

I am not writing this because I did not get the role of implementing a clinical system for a London Trust on which I had specific training and experience only to be told not enough NHS experience. But because at the same time I also interviewed for another role at a South England Trust for a clinical system which was similar to the one I had experience on, and they did offer me the role even though I did not have enough NHS experience nor specific system experience. Funny thing is London Trust was paying a lot less than the one outside London. Unfortunately I had to turn it down as the commute would have been a killer.


The other issue is that once you contract in the NHS many private sector companies would not touch you with a barge-pole.


Part of the issue with updates and patching is that there is a lack of understanding on how to setup and how check if WSUS is working properly. And another part is that it may take weeks if not months to get a patch or update approved. Again this is down to the permie mentality. My attitude in urgent cases is send out an email to say that it is happening unless you reply with good reason why not.

The main point about NHS experience is that as a contractor you have a responsibility that one slip-up on data could result in death. Even a system down has resulted in vital information not being accessed by a doctor thus resulting if fatalities.

BigRed
18th May 2017, 22:05
The other issue is that once you contract in the NHS many private sector companies would not touch you with a barge-pole.

Seriously? I get that NHS, Investment Banks etc think they are 'special' (they aren't), but the average private sector company wouldn't give a damn.

Drei
23rd May 2017, 15:43
Seriously? I get that NHS, Investment Banks etc think they are 'special' (they aren't), but the average private sector company wouldn't give a damn.


Maybe someone on here can provide a real example but I really do think that you would find it quite hard to find something else in the private sector if your CV says 10 years NHS Experience. You are 100% correct about the whole "special" thing in regards to NHS, FORD and Banking. Could be plenty more but those 3 are the ones I experienced myself.

Drei
20th June 2017, 10:33
P.S. I thought this might make a few people giggle.

So I heard from someone that was in a meeting with Barts that apparently the Malware spread to the whole of the trust from a "Scanner", I shit you not. I work in IT but have never heard of that before, the last time I heard something completely idiotic was when a guy told me he got a virus from a printer cable.

Anyone that knows more could entertain us and validate this. Can you really get a virus from a Scanner? Maybe if they used a USB stick and connected it to it then from there accessed the files?

scooterscot
20th June 2017, 10:54
I know folk that can crash a computer just by looking at it.

BrilloPad
20th June 2017, 11:11
I thought most viruses spread from NLyUK.

Drei
20th June 2017, 11:57
I know folk that can crash a computer just by looking at it.

Like I said, I kid you not. I laughed the moment they mentioned the scanner. Obviously I don't want to be ignorant to security issues. I wonder if this is the official statement used by the trust.

This was a meeting asking for the latest status, a lot of patients got pushed back or had appointments cancelled, some were for scans and other serious matters.