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BrilloPad
22nd June 2017, 12:53
Fruit and veg farmers facing migrant labour shortages - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40354331)

Eirikur
22nd June 2017, 12:58
Or reverse Brexit, but yes cut benefits of Brits refusing to do this work after brexit

SueEllen
22nd June 2017, 13:03
Nope.

People based in London or any other city no where near farms cannot go and do those jobs instead they can do retail, cleaning, care, hotel and security jobs. And in fact many do but they need their poor wages topped up by the in work benefits.

Oh and benefits are frozen until April 2020 so in real terms that is a cut.

I just hope you never get extremely ill for a long time and have to rely on benefits.

The_Equalizer
22nd June 2017, 13:06
Nope.

People based in London or any other city no where near farms cannot go and do those jobs instead they can do retail, cleaning, care, hotel and security jobs. And in fact many do but they need their poor wages topped up by the in work benefits.

Oh and benefits are frozen until April 2020 so in real terms that is a cut.

I just hope you never get extremely ill for a long time and have to rely on benefits.

Or perhaps housing costs need to come down? I remember in the early 1990s when even on low pay you could by yourself a small flat above a shop.

SueEllen
22nd June 2017, 13:10
Or perhaps housing costs need to come down? I remember in the early 1990s when even on low pay you could by yourself a small flat above a shop.

Cleaners don't earn enough to buy but they do if they do two or three jobs earn enough to rent without the state subsidising them.

d000hg
22nd June 2017, 13:11
Benefits don't need to be cut, they need to be stringently yet compassionately applied.

The_Equalizer
22nd June 2017, 13:11
Cleaners don't earn enough to buy but they do if they do two or three jobs earn enough to rent without the state subsidising them.

They did in the early 90s or weren't far off.

SueEllen
22nd June 2017, 13:14
They did in the early 90s or weren't far off.

I had classmates whose parents were cleaners who they lived on council estates and rented. Then again this was in London where house prices are always higher.

BTW they let that slip by accident. Oddly no-one bullied them for it.

SueEllen
22nd June 2017, 13:15
Benefits don't need to be cut, they need to be stringently yet compassionately applied.

You mean like sanctions if someone has a hospital appointment or needs to go to a funeral, and the job centre won't let them change their sign on day?

northernladyuk
22nd June 2017, 13:16
Time for retrospectively defined tax evaders to be put to the land to dig for victory.

BrilloPad
22nd June 2017, 13:17
When will an automated fruit picking machine be invented?

The_Equalizer
22nd June 2017, 13:21
I had classmates whose parents were cleaners who they lived on council estates and rented. Then again this was in London where house prices are always higher.

BTW they let that slip by accident. Oddly no-one bullied them for it.

I remember houses in Lewisham and Peckham where about £50k in the early/mid 90s, so flats were probably about £30K (which is a shade below £60K in real terms). These were just about obtainable for anyone who had full-time work.

The_Equalizer
22nd June 2017, 13:22
Time for retrospectively defined tax evaders to be put to the land to dig for victory.

Too jingoistic for these progressive times.

PurpleGorilla
22nd June 2017, 13:30
Or perhaps housing costs need to come down? I remember in the early 1990s when even on low pay you could by yourself a small flat above a shop.

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2016/05/27/15/34B0F0AA00000578-3610689-image-a-22_1464358314106.jpg

SueEllen
22nd June 2017, 13:36
I remember houses in Lewisham and Peckham where about £50k in the early/mid 90s, so flats were probably about £30K (which is a shade below £60K in real terms). These were just about obtainable for anyone who had full-time work.

All the low paid jobs I mentioned apart from retail and some hotel work tended to be part-time.

And 1990 was the top of a housing bubble.

BrilloPad
22nd June 2017, 13:38
All the low paid jobs I mentioned apart from retail and some hotel work tended to be part-time.

And 1990 was the top of a housing bubble.

And now 1990 looks like a great time to have bought.

Dark Black
22nd June 2017, 13:41
And now 1990 looks like a great time to have bought.

It was (well 1992). :banana:

The_Equalizer
22nd June 2017, 13:47
All the low paid jobs I mentioned apart from retail and some hotel work tended to be part-time.

And 1990 was the top of a housing bubble.

I did say early to mid. I think 1996 was the bottom.

The_Equalizer
22nd June 2017, 13:50
And now 1990 looks like a great time to have bought.

I quoted the prices from Lewisham and Peckham because my very good friend's dad was buying them at the time. While others were buying in 'posh parts' he was busy hoovering them up in inner south London. Back then he used to drive in a wreck of a Peugeot 205. Now he collects his rent in a brand-new Bentley Continental GT Speed. Such are the times.

xoggoth
22nd June 2017, 13:56
Getting on for 100k in prisons. Bring back chain gangs

PurpleGorilla
22nd June 2017, 13:56
I quoted the prices from Lewisham and Peckham because my very good friend's dad was buying them at the time. While others were buying in 'posh parts' he was busy hoovering them up in inner south London. Back then he used to drive in a wreck of a Peugeot 205. Now he collects his rent in a brand-new Bentley Continental GT Speed. Such are the times.

https://www.policyforum.labour.org.uk/images/430

The_Equalizer
22nd June 2017, 13:58
https://www.policyforum.labour.org.uk/images/430

I presume you are referring to high taxation levels.

xoggoth
22nd June 2017, 14:02
All very well saying we should work for the many but there's just too darn many of them!

PurpleGorilla
22nd June 2017, 14:05
I presume you are referring to high taxation levels.

BTL has been a cancer at the heart of our economy for too long.

Governments of all colours have fuelled it, schmoozed it, and even benefited personally from it.

So now future generations are literally fvcked.

Yeah, I'd tax the shit out of BTL.

rl4engc
22nd June 2017, 14:05
People based in London or any other city no where near farms cannot go and do those jobs instead they can do retail, cleaning, care, hotel and security jobs.

Yes they can.

Nobody has a god given right live in their 'chosen city', and if that city happens to be one of the most expensive on the planet, tough tulip.

They either need to cross train into something where they can then afford to live where they please, or move on and follow the labour market.


Actually this would kill two birds with one stone. 1) Move the lazy tw*ts from their DSS HMO rented properties near the city centre to rented accomodation where they can afford to live from their income on a fruit farm. 2) That city house gets sold on the open market to a working family.

The_Equalizer
22nd June 2017, 14:09
BTL has been a cancer at the heart of our economy for too long.

Governments of all colours have fuelled it, schmoozed it, and even benefited personally from it.

So now future generations are literally fvcked.

Yeah, I'd tax the tulip out of BTL.

I'd suggest a few years of sensible inflation and a bit of extra tax might do a better job. Loopy taxing of anything has unforeseen consequences.

The_Equalizer
22nd June 2017, 14:11
Yes they can.

Nobody has a god given right live in their 'chosen city', and if that city happens to be one of the most expensive on the planet, tough tulip.

They either need to cross train into something where they can then afford to live where they please, or move on and follow the labour market.


Actually this would kill two birds with one stone. 1) Move the lazy tw*ts from their DSS HMO rented properties near the city centre to rented accomodation where they can afford to live from their income on a fruit farm. 2) That city house gets sold on the open market to a working family.

Just remember all the poor are deserving.

PurpleGorilla
22nd June 2017, 14:11
I'd suggest a few years of sensible inflation and a bit of extra tax might do a better job. Loopy taxing of anything has unforeseen consequences.

That would work for me too. Anything to restore balance.

original PM
22nd June 2017, 14:15
Yes they can.

Nobody has a god given right live in their 'chosen city', and if that city happens to be one of the most expensive on the planet, tough tulip.

They either need to cross train into something where they can then afford to live where they please, or move on and follow the labour market.


Actually this would kill two birds with one stone. 1) Move the lazy tw*ts from their DSS HMO rented properties near the city centre to rented accomodation where they can afford to live from their income on a fruit farm. 2) That city house gets sold on the open market to a working family.

Absolutely - if you are going to get a free house do not expect to choose where it is.

It is time we stopped pandering to these people and started making them productive members of society.

It will take a approx 1 generation for people to realise that if they are not going to support themselves then they will become a ward of the state and be treated as such.

Also bring back workhouses!

PurpleGorilla
22nd June 2017, 14:17
Absolutely - if you are going to get a free house do not expect to choose where it is.

It is time we stopped pandering to these people and started making them productive members of society.

It will take a approx 1 generation for people to realise that if they are not going to support themselves then they will become a ward of the state and be treated as such.

Also bring back workhouses!

What about a London Fire Fighter.

Should they be able to afford somewhere to live near where they work?

https://static.standard.co.uk/s3fs-public/styles/article_small/public/thumbnails/image/2017/06/15/07/grenfellfirefighters17k.jpg

northernladyuk
22nd June 2017, 14:20
What about a London Fire Fighter.

Should they be able to afford somewhere to live near where they work?

https://static.standard.co.uk/s3fs-public/styles/article_small/public/thumbnails/image/2017/06/15/07/grenfellfirefighters17k.jpg

Presumably they are public sector unionised layabouts with gold-plated pensions, who should live wherever the market dictates.

BlasterBates
22nd June 2017, 14:24
When you can't get the lower skilled that hits the economy until higher skilled people lose their jobs and move in to do the low skilled jobs to put food on the table. In 2000's recession there were IT contractors working in B&Q.

The_Equalizer
22nd June 2017, 14:27
When you can't get the lower skilled that hits the economy until higher skilled people lose their jobs and move in to do the low skilled jobs to put food on the table. In 2000's recession there were IT contractors working in B&Q.

Are IT contractors meant to have skills?

radish2008
22nd June 2017, 14:28
Time for retrospectively defined tax evaders to be put to the land to dig for victory.

Except most people in Norfolk can't tell the difference between a rock and a potato. That's why the eastern Europeans are there in the first place.

northernladyuk
22nd June 2017, 14:31
Except most people in Norfolk can't tell the difference between a rock and a potato. That's why the eastern Europeans are there in the first place.

You can't pick a rock up with webbed toes.

radish2008
22nd June 2017, 14:39
You can't pick a rock up with webbed toes.

Hahaha. Awesome reply.

d000hg
22nd June 2017, 14:56
You mean like sanctions if someone has a hospital appointment or needs to go to a funeral, and the job centre won't let them change their sign on day?Stringent but compassionate was what I said, I think that answers your question. Treating claimants like naughty children getting the money if they've been good that week is not it.

SueEllen
22nd June 2017, 15:00
Absolutely - if you are going to get a free house do not expect to choose where it is.

It is time we stopped pandering to these people and started making them productive members of society.

It will take a approx 1 generation for people to realise that if they are not going to support themselves then they will become a ward of the state and be treated as such.

Also bring back workhouses!

Their houses aren't free they pay partial rent if they are in work.

Plus some London councils have placed people in Kent and Birmingham.

radish2008
22nd June 2017, 15:26
Absolutely - if you are going to get a free house do not expect to choose where it is.

It is time we stopped pandering to these people and started making them productive members of society.

It will take a approx 1 generation for people to realise that if they are not going to support themselves then they will become a ward of the state and be treated as such.

Also bring back workhouses!

Ah the caring face of the UK.

original PM
22nd June 2017, 15:34
Their houses aren't free they pay partial rent if they are in work.

Plus some London councils have placed people in Kent and Birmingham.


Ah the caring face of the UK.

I thought you wanted to solve the problem, not just keep spouting platitudes and ultimately do nothing?

BlasterBates
22nd June 2017, 16:17
Leave voter realises his business will collapse because of Brexit (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-latest-eu-migrant-workers-fruit-farm-harry-hall-hunter-partnership-bbc-radio-4-today-a7802381.html)

:laugh

OwlHoot
22nd June 2017, 16:19
Leave voter realises his business will collapse because of Brexit (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-latest-eu-migrant-workers-fruit-farm-harry-hall-hunter-partnership-bbc-radio-4-today-a7802381.html)

:laugh

FFS - Hasn't this idiot heard of robots? I mean how hard is it to design a robot that can pick strawberries?

original PM
22nd June 2017, 16:55
Leave voter realises his business will collapse because of Brexit (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-latest-eu-migrant-workers-fruit-farm-harry-hall-hunter-partnership-bbc-radio-4-today-a7802381.html)

:laugh

Ok for the last time no one has said that someone from the EU will not be able to come and pwork in the UK.

What they will not be able to do is come over here, work for a few months and then stay in the UK indefinetly.

subtle but important difference.

SueEllen
22nd June 2017, 17:15
I thought you wanted to solve the problem, not just keep spouting platitudes and ultimately do nothing?

Well the threat of being dumped in Brum or Kent has made some people less dependent on the state...

AtW
22nd June 2017, 17:32
"In its Brexit White Paper earlier this year the Government admitted the UK Parliament “has remained sovereign throughout our membership of the EU”."

:rollin:

AtW
22nd June 2017, 17:33
FFS - Hasn't this idiot heard of robots? I mean how hard is it to design a robot that can pick strawberries?

It's not hard.

What's hard is to make is cost effective...

northernladyuk
22nd June 2017, 17:35
"In its Brexit White Paper earlier this year the Government admitted the UK Parliament “has remained sovereign throughout our membership of the EU”."

:rollin:

Only a cretin would have ever disputed this.

darmstadt
22nd June 2017, 19:46
Only a cretin would have ever disputed this.

Er...ummm...it's....er..written...doh,...er...um, lets see....oh....

http://i4.mirror.co.uk/incoming/article6582828.ece/ALTERNATES/s615b/Boris-Johnson.jpg

bobspud
23rd June 2017, 08:43
Nope.

People based in London or any other city no where near farms cannot go and do those jobs instead they can do retail, cleaning, care, hotel and security jobs. And in fact many do but they need their poor wages topped up by the in work benefits.

Oh and benefits are frozen until April 2020 so in real terms that is a cut.

I just hope you never get extremely ill for a long time and have to rely on benefits.

Dont worry the way it works is if you need the state they will let you loose your house then piss all your savings away before they will start helping you but by then you will be bankrupt and effectively trapped in their charity. If you are a higher rate tax payer you have effectively NO safety net in this country.

northernladyuk
23rd June 2017, 08:48
Dont worry the way it works is if you need the state they will let you loose your house then piss all your savings away before they will start helping you but by then you will be bankrupt and effectively trapped in their charity. If you are a higher rate tax payer you have effectively NO safety net in this country.

Actually, people with their assets tied up in their principle private residence have much better protection for their assets that other people.

Having said that, we really do move to a proper form of social insurance.

BrilloPad
23rd June 2017, 08:54
Actually, people with their assets tied up in their principle private residence have much better protection for their assets that other people.

Having said that, we really do move to a proper form of social insurance.

Universal benefits...

BlasterBates
23rd June 2017, 08:56
Ok for the last time no one has said that someone from the EU will not be able to come and pwork in the UK.

What they will not be able to do is come over here, work for a few months and then stay in the UK indefinetly.

subtle but important difference.

They simply don't want to come any more.

96% drop in EU applicants for nursing jobs (https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/jun/12/96-drop-in-eu-nurses-registering-to-work-in-britain-since-brexit-vote)

Net migration from Eastern Europe to Britain slows to a trickle after Brexit vote (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/05/25/net-migration-eastern-eurpoe-slows-trickle/)

Whatever rule the UK comes out with, you will probably not find EU workers coming to the UK, why should they.

BrilloPad
23rd June 2017, 08:57
you will probably not find EU workers coming to the UK, why should they ?

Good.

northernladyuk
23rd June 2017, 09:05
Universal benefits...

It's all very well in theory... but there needs to be decent universal insurance that people contribute to via NIC when in work which ensures a reasonable breathing space when someone loses their job, becomes sick, or dies with dependents. There does need to be a safety net as well, but currently we throw everyone into the same financial situation.

Edit: :spel

BrilloPad
23rd June 2017, 09:07
It's all very well in theory... but tehre needs to be decent universal insurance that people contribute to via NIC when in work which ensures a reasonable breathing space when someone loses their job, becomes sick, or dies with dependents. There does need to be a safety net as well, but currently we throw everyone into the same financial situation.

Do you actually believe that NIC is anything other than a form of income tax?

bobspud
23rd June 2017, 09:07
Actually, people with their assets tied up in their principle private residence have much better protection for their assets that other people.

Having said that, we really do move to a proper form of social insurance.

Dont kid yourself. When I thought I might need it I had a talk to them. They explained they would expect you to sell your house and downsize so that you could use the capital first...

BlasterBates
23rd June 2017, 09:11
Good.

The problem you have is that the population is expanding at half a million a year. 50% of that increase is due to people living longer, the other 50% (since Brexit) is non-EU migration.

80% of non-EU migrants don't come to the UK to work, they "loaf around" i.e. they study or they are family members.

Before Brexit 80% of EU migrants came to the UK to work. They now don't come. So the UK's population is growing just as fast as before but now the working population is shrinking.

It will be interesting to see how that problem will be solved.

SueEllen
23rd June 2017, 09:14
The problem you have is that the population is expanding at half a million a year. 50% of that increase is due to people living longer, the other 50% (since Brexit) is non-EU migration.

80% of non-EU migrants don't come to the UK to work, they "loaf around" i.e. they study or they are family members.

Before Brexit 80% of EU migrants came to the UK to work. They now don't come. So the UK's population is growing just as fast as before but now the working population is shrinking.

It will be interesting to see how that problem will be solved.

Kill of old people as their pensions make up too much of the benefits bill.

BlasterBates
23rd June 2017, 09:16
Kill of old people as their pensions make up too much of the benefits bill.

indeed or put them in the fruit farms

:D

BrilloPad
23rd June 2017, 09:20
The problem you have is that the population is expanding at half a million a year. 50% of that increase is due to people living longer, the other 50% (since Brexit) is non-EU migration.

80% of non-EU migrants don't come to the UK to work, they "loaf around" i.e. they study or they are family members.

Before Brexit 80% of EU migrants came to the UK to work. They now don't come. So the UK's population is growing just as fast as before but now the working population is shrinking.

It will be interesting to see how that problem will be solved.

Japan is ahead of us. I reckon robots.

BrilloPad
23rd June 2017, 09:20
Kill of old people as their pensions make up too much of the benefits bill.

Plus they live in large houses needed for those with families.....

northernladyuk
23rd June 2017, 09:20
Dont kid yourself. When I thought I might need it I had a talk to them. They explained they would expect you to sell your house and downsize so that you could use the capital first...

What benefit was this for?

The_Equalizer
23rd June 2017, 09:21
Plus they live in large houses needed for those with families.....

Dont' worry - requisition is all the rage.

SueEllen
23rd June 2017, 09:22
Japan is ahead of us. I reckon robots.

In Japan old people don't really retire.

They either get other new jobs e.g. B&Q type or they do lots of community work e.g.volunteering. That is unless they are farmers or similar.

northernladyuk
23rd June 2017, 09:22
Kill of old people as their pensions make up too much of the benefits bill.

They are also living longer which is an important contributing factor to the rise in the population which the Kippers and fellow travellers tell us is A Bad Thing.

BrilloPad
23rd June 2017, 09:26
They are also living longer which is an important contributing factor to the rise in the population which the Kippers and fellow travellers tell us is A Bad Thing.

I know of a few people with elderly relatives who find them difficult(like PC). The alternative is far worse.

Though the only reason I want to become old is to become as much of a burden to my children as they were to me.

The_Equalizer
23rd June 2017, 09:28
I know of a few people with elderly relatives who find them difficult(like PC). The alternative is far worse.

Though the only reason I want to become old is to become as much of a burden to my children as they were to me.

You're presuming your kids will give a stuff. I know of someone who's just stuck his mum in a home and bu66ered off to Cyprus - nice.

BlasterBates
23rd June 2017, 09:31
Japan is ahead of us. I reckon robots.

Japan also has a huge deficit. They've not racked up huge personal debts so they are basically holding Japanese bonds and hold up the Japanese massive government debt, which is actually much bigger than Greece.

BrilloPad
23rd June 2017, 09:36
Japan also has a huge deficit. They've not racked up huge personal debts so they are basically holding Japanese bonds and hold up the Japanese massive government debt, which is actually much bigger than Greece.

Indeed. Japan benefits from a loyal elderly population.

PurpleGorilla
23rd June 2017, 09:39
Plus they live in large houses needed for those with families.....

There is no strong desire/need for them to downsize, combined with mediocre properties to move down too.

northernladyuk
23rd June 2017, 09:52
For them that is true.

The problem is that by taxing estates on death we incentivise old people to live. There should be an old age tax with reverse winter fuel payments and then a tax free death.

PurpleGorilla
23rd June 2017, 09:55
For them that is true.

It certainly is in my parents case!

northernladyuk
23rd June 2017, 10:03
There should be 100% death duties and no trusts. That would avoid the issue of old age care....

Are you listening? It will just make them live longer.

PurpleGorilla
23rd June 2017, 10:06
There should be 100% death duties and no trusts. That would avoid the issue of old age care....

You mean no inheritance for the children?

northernladyuk
23rd June 2017, 10:08
Good! My parents are dead. I wish they were still alive.

They'd only be disappointed.

PurpleGorilla
23rd June 2017, 10:18
To improve social mobility.

Right wing papers usually argue that children need an inheritance to get them started in business. What about orphans? Why are we missing out on their talents?

Ronnie Corbett's child spent his money on very dubious activities.

I've not banked on a penny inheritance - so whether it goes to the cat home, or treasury - I am at peace with that. If the money goes on improving the UK, all the better!

But there are a fair few youngsters who are banking on the final BOMAD payment when the account closes.

What about you? Did you inherit anything?

PurpleGorilla
23rd June 2017, 10:23
I did inherit. I would happily give it all for my mother to be alive.

Of course you would. That is beyond contestation.

So has it been used to improve social mobility?

PurpleGorilla
23rd June 2017, 10:33
No.

I never expected to inherit anything and I don't intend to pass anything onto my children.

I have always been against inherited wealth.

So what have you done with the money?

This is fascinating...!

SueEllen
23rd June 2017, 10:39
So what have you done with the money?

This is fascinating...!

That's unfair.

BTW you know Brillo has a disabled child?

PurpleGorilla
23rd June 2017, 10:45
That's unfair.

BTW you know Brillo has a disabled child?

No I didn't know that.

I'm not trying to be unfair at all.

Just trying to understand the thoughts and decisions of someone who doesn't believe in inherited wealth, then going on to inherit, and then not intending to pass it on. The money has to go somewhere!

If it's spent on his kid, enjoying time with his kid, that's great.

Too many would fritter it on sport cars and jewellery.

PurpleGorilla
23rd June 2017, 10:46
This is the point for me to retire from the thread. Sorry about that.

Me too - wasn't trying to be a dick. Just fascinated with your reasoning.

SueEllen
23rd June 2017, 10:54
Too many would fritter it on sport cars and jewellery.

The only people I know who frittered their inheritance on sports cars and jewellery don't have children school age, already have a decent size property, and/or don't have other close relations with care issues.

PurpleGorilla
23rd June 2017, 11:26
The only people I know who frittered their inheritance on sports cars and jewellery don't have children school age, already have a decent size property, and/or don't have other close relations with care issues.

If the waterfall of inheritance ends, do the kids at the bottom lose out?

The_Equalizer
23rd June 2017, 11:30
If the waterfall of inheritance ends, do the kids at the bottom lose out?

I’m pretty sure tax rises are proportional to tax evasion. Why should the state get its mits on already taxed income?

northernladyuk
23rd June 2017, 11:46
I’m pretty sure tax rises are proportional to tax evasion. Why should the state get its mits on already taxed income?

So will you abolish VAT on the same basis?

The_Equalizer
23rd June 2017, 11:48
So will you abolish VAT on the same basis?

Thought you had to buy stuff to encounter VAT?

Bee
23rd June 2017, 11:54
You should have listened to susguro. :(

PurpleGorilla
23rd June 2017, 11:57
I’m pretty sure tax rises are proportional to tax evasion. Why should the state get its mits on already taxed income?

What I mean is - if one generation decides to keep their inherited wealth, spend it on what ever they fancy, or even to pass it on to the cats home because they do not believe in inherited wealth - and the youngsters at the bottom of the waterfall inherit nothing. Have they lost out?

This is an ethical question.

original PM
23rd June 2017, 11:59
What I mean is - if one generation decides to keep their inherited wealth, spend it on what ever they fancy, or even to pass it on to the cats home because they do not believe in inherited wealth - and the youngsters at the bottom of the waterfall inherit nothing. Have they lost out?

This is an ethical question.

Not necessarily.

Many people leave little to nothing for the next generation.

For example all my grand parents are now dead - think in inheritance I ended up with about 20k altogether - not life changing

My parents got nothing as it skipped them and came straight to me and my brothers.

The_Equalizer
23rd June 2017, 12:24
What I mean is - if one generation decides to keep their inherited wealth, spend it on what ever they fancy, or even to pass it on to the cats home because they do not believe in inherited wealth - and the youngsters at the bottom of the waterfall inherit nothing. Have they lost out?

This is an ethical question.

Sorry, my misunderstanding. Yes, of course they have lost out. However, the main reason that this is become such a question is that inheritance of even a relatively modest house (in terms of size) can be a life changing event financially.

northernladyuk
23rd June 2017, 12:42
Thought you had to buy stuff to encounter VAT?

So? It is still already taxed income.

The_Equalizer
23rd June 2017, 12:53
So? It is still already taxed income.

Difference being (as you well know :wink) is it's taxing something that has already been purchased and subject to tax (stamp duty) and bought with income that has already been taxed. Anyway, I say viva the seven year rule.

northernladyuk
23rd June 2017, 12:55
Difference being (as you well know :wink) is it's taxing something that has already been purchased and subject to tax (stamp duty) and bought with income that has already been taxed. Anyway, I say viva the seven year rule.

You're talking nonsense. Again.

vetran
23rd June 2017, 12:57
I know of a few people with elderly relatives who find them difficult(like PC). The alternative is far worse.

Though the only reason I want to become old is to become as much of a burden to my children as they were to me.

Be nice to your kids they choose your care home!

vetran
23rd June 2017, 12:58
You're talking nonsense. Again.

he is just trying to get down to the remainers level :grin

The_Equalizer
23rd June 2017, 12:58
You're talking nonsense. Again.

I'm a fast learner.

Inheritence tax - loved by those without anything coming their way, loathed by those that have.

northernladyuk
23rd June 2017, 13:54
I'm a fast learner.

Inheritence tax - loved by those without anything coming their way, loathed by those that have.

What is Inheritence tax?

The_Equalizer
23rd June 2017, 13:56
What is Inheritence tax?

I appreciate it's Friday afternoon, but you can do better than that.

northernladyuk
23rd June 2017, 14:00
I appreciate it's Friday afternoon, but you can do better than that.

You get what you deserve.