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View Full Version : David Davis will tell the European Union: you can't



AtW
16th July 2017, 15:58
"...“pick the referee” for legal disputes after Brexit as a new round of talks begin.

Despite the hopes of some in his party, the Brexit Secretary is holding a firm line when it comes to ending the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice [ECJ]

In recent days the Government has come under sustained pressure from pro-EU Tory MPs and political opponents to ditch Theresa May’s red line on the ECJ.

She believes Britain should not be part of any EU-wide body that uses the court as an arbiter, such as ones that regulate the movement of nuclear material or pharmaceuticals across borders.

Mr Davis has made clear in private he supports the position, indicating that the court is instinctively favourable towards the EU.

“If Manchester United played Real Madrid, you would not let Real pick the referee,” he has said."

Source: David Davis warns Brussels: You can't pick referee for legal disputes after Brexit* (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07/16/david-davis-warns-brussels-cant-pick-referee-legal-disputes/)

:rollin: :rollin: :rollin:

Following this "logic" it should be some foreign courts deciding on all UK cases that involve Govt, including taxes.

PM FAO Mr Davis - they fooking can because they got all the fooking cards.

woohoo
16th July 2017, 20:44
Thanks for sharing this, im sure all the self loathers will be posting shortly.

centurian
16th July 2017, 20:57
He's right.

When the EU does a trade deal with Canada - or any other country, the ECJ doesn't referee disputes.

If the EU want their citizens rights governed by the ECJ while in Britain - will British citizens rights living in Europe be subject to British courts.

Of course it won't

It's bonkers.

We may well cave in, fold like a pack of cards, and give them whatever they want - that's been the modus operandi so far.

But it's still bonkers.

AtW
16th July 2017, 21:01
Brexit is bonkers.

Everything else is just blowback

scooterscot
16th July 2017, 21:14
The subject of Brexit came up today amongst others here in München an dem Beirgarten. 5 minutes later we were on another subject. The point is some of my German fraternity used to talk about it muchy but now it is just business as usual. I'm kind of surprised how quickly it has blown over. No one cares now. Only the UK is pretending like their centre stage with Brexit. Seriously :tumble: reaction. Best going with hard Brexit and pressing the UK reset button.

I'm reminded of these projects for clients who asked me to develop a new process but it must be able to mirror our old results. I'm like well then it's not new is it? If your old results were mustard I'd not be here would I?

This is what the UK is doing in my eyes. Wasting tons of money time and energy expecting a different result.

BrilloPad
17th July 2017, 11:26
I'm reminded of these projects for clients who asked me to develop a new process but it must be able to mirror our old results. I'm like well then it's not new is it? If your old results were mustard I'd not be here would I?

This is what the UK is doing in my eyes. Wasting tons of money time and energy expecting a different result.

Sometimes old processes are not scalable, unreliable, or difficult to maintain.

Typical thick remoaner.

excon
17th July 2017, 11:42
Brexit is bonkers.

Everything else is just blowback


I can highly recommend this book, Adults In The Room: My Battle With Europe’s Deep Establishment, by Yanis Varoufakis.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Adults-Room-Battle-Europes-Establishment/dp/184792445X

Maybe the scales might actually fall from the eyes of one or two remainers about what the EU actually is. After reading you might realise the few crumbs the EU elite allow to fall down to the peasants are really not worth the membership fee.

AtW
17th July 2017, 12:24
I can highly recommend this book, Adults In The Room: My Battle With Europe’s Deep Establishment, by Yanis Varoufakis.

:rollin:

What next, read "the real truth" about EU on InfoWars site?

excon
17th July 2017, 12:41
:rollin:

What next, read "the real truth" about EU on InfoWars site?

There are none so blind as those who will not see. Yanis Varoufakis, you may remember him from the Greek debt crisis? Has recent experience negotiating with Angela Merkel and the EU. Your just some bloke on a chat forum, just a gentle reminder.

original PM
17th July 2017, 12:42
We do need to get out from under the ECJ.

It can and does simply dictate laws which we have to implement with no say (according to some guy on R4 on Friday)

And that simply needs to stop.

AtW
17th July 2017, 12:44
There are none so blind as those who will not see. Yanis Varoufakis, you may remember him from the Greek debt crisis? Has recent experience negotiating with Angela Merkel and the EU. Your just some bloke on a chat forum, just a gentle reminder.

Yes, I remember very well how he fooked up negotiations and had to be fired.

meridian
17th July 2017, 12:55
We do need to get out from under the ECJ.

It can and does simply dictate laws which we have to implement with no say (according to some guy on R4 on Friday)

And that simply needs to stop.

Err, no it doesn't. It's a court, not a legislature.


The European Commission has the initiative to propose legislation. During the ordinary legislative procedure, the Council (which are ministers from member state governments) and the European Parliament (elected by citizens) can make amendments and must give their consent for laws to pass.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Union_law

If you want a say in the laws that the EU propose to implement, just contact your local MEP representative. It's called "democracy".

BlasterBates
17th July 2017, 12:59
Err, no it doesn't. It's a court, not a legislature.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Union_law

If you want a say in the laws that the EU propose to implement, just contact your local MEP representative. It's called "democracy".

By not wanting to be under the jurisdiction is basically because the UK government wishes to flout the rules and behave like an untrustworthy "Banana Republic".

in that case bye bye financial services.

PurpleGorilla
17th July 2017, 13:07
By not wanting to be under the jurisdiction is basically because the UK government wishes to flout the rules and behave like an untrustworthy "Banana Republic".

in that case bye bye financial services.

So then we look at Asia, and Africa, and South America and all the other areas of the world who are growing and developing.

original PM
17th July 2017, 13:12
Err, no it doesn't. It's a court, not a legislature.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Union_law

If you want a say in the laws that the EU propose to implement, just contact your local MEP representative. It's called "democracy".

Do not confuse the Court of Justice of the European Union https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Court_of_Justice_of_the_European_Union with the ECJ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Court_of_Justice

meridian
17th July 2017, 13:15
By not wanting to be under the jurisdiction is basically because the UK government wishes to flout the rules and behave like an untrustworthy "Banana Republic".

in that case bye bye financial services.

I wouldn't go quite that far - the UK high/supreme courts are still seen as independent arbiters not subject to government coercion, we're not quite a banana republic yet! . The problem is one of jurisdiction and agreeing which courts any arbitration can be appealed to and which legislation takes precedence as primary law.

AtW
17th July 2017, 13:20
So then we look at Asia, and Africa, and South America and all the other areas of the world who are growing and developing.

Brilliant idea - let's sell them stuff like legal services where hourly rate is higher than annual wage there.

meridian
17th July 2017, 13:21
Do not confuse the Court of Justice of the European Union https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Court_of_Justice_of_the_European_Union with the ECJ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Court_of_Justice

I'm not, but thank you for the links.

Neither of them "dictate laws which we have to implement with no say".

PurpleGorilla
17th July 2017, 13:24
Brilliant idea - let's sell them stuff like legal services where hourly rate is higher than annual wage there.

Follow the growth...

darmstadt
17th July 2017, 13:24
I'm not, but thank you for the links.

Neither of them "dictate laws which we have to implement with no say".

Yes they do..."Paragraph 4, Subsection 2 - Brexit Handbook" :grin

AtW
17th July 2017, 13:30
Follow the growth...

China follows it - they own low and middle end goods, what does UK produce for poor people in Asia and Africa, Range Rovers and real estate in Kensington & Chelsea?

PurpleGorilla
17th July 2017, 13:34
China follows it - they own low and middle end goods, what does UK produce for poor people in Asia and Africa, Range Rovers and real estate in Kensington & Chelsea?

Adapt or die.

AtW
17th July 2017, 13:37
Adapt or die.

I can move tomorrow, where as most people in this country lack savings to manage few months out of work.

BrilloPad
17th July 2017, 13:38
I can move tomorrow, where as most people in this country lack savings to manage few months out of work.

I wish you f**king well would.

Though if you move by car you will probably get no further than the nearest wall.....

PurpleGorilla
17th July 2017, 13:39
I can move tomorrow, where as most people in this country lack savings to manage few months out of work.

I don't doubt it. The UK needs a kick up the @rse.

https://www.ft.com/content/effd72cc-5d6e-11e7-9bc8-8055f264aa8b

BrilloPad
17th July 2017, 13:44
I don't doubt it. The UK needs a kick up the @rse.

https://www.ft.com/content/effd72cc-5d6e-11e7-9bc8-8055f264aa8b

For those who have not registered: -

30th June 2017
UK households have responded to a tight squeeze on incomes from rising inflation, taxes and falling wages by saving less than at any time in at least 50 years.

According to new figures from the Office for National Statistics, 1.7 per cent of income was left unspent in the first quarter of 2017, the lowest savings ratio since comparable records began in 1963.

UK consumers have kept on borrowing and spending since the Brexit vote and the economy has continued to grow as a result. But as the savings ratio falls, economists and policymakers will worry about how much consumer spending can contribute to growth in the months ahead.

Presenting the quarterly national accounts on Friday, the ONS confirmed that in the first quarter of 2017 growth was 0.2 per cent, with reasonable 0.4 per cent growth in household consumption and 0.6 per cent growth in business investment offset by imports growing faster than exports.

The savings ratio has averaged 9.2 per cent of disposable income over the past 54 years, but has been on a precipitous decline in the past year as households have kept on spending while their incomes have been squeezed.

In the first quarter of 2016, the savings ratio was 6.1 per cent, already below the long-term average, and it fell to 3.3 per cent by the fourth quarter of the year.

The ONS said the fall was mostly caused by a rise in taxes on incomes and wealth, which led to a fall in household disposable incomes that was not matched by a corresponding drop in spending.

Part of the rise in taxes was temporary, the ONS said, resulting from high tax payments in early 2017 on dividends paid a year earlier, but it added that not all of the drop was explained by temporary factors.

“The underlying trend is for a continued fall in the savings ratio,” according to Darren Morgan, head of gross domestic product statistics at the ONS.

The savings ratio can be volatile and a low ratio is not automatically a sign of excessive consumption. Households would seek to save less if they were confident about their future incomes.

The question now is whether the ratio has fallen because households are correct in thinking the squeeze on their incomes is temporary or whether they will subsequently find they have spent too much.

Scott Bowman of Capital Economics, which generally has a positive view of the economic outlook, said some of the details of the official data “might call into question the sustainability of even this [0.2 per cent] rate of growth”, but he remained optimistic. “Growth in 2017 as a whole will be similar to 2016’s 1.8 per cent rate,” he said.

Samuel Tombs of Pantheon Macroeconomics, which has a more gloomy organisational view, said the data showed that consumer spending was unsustainable.

AtW
17th July 2017, 14:23
According to new figures from the Office for National Statistics, 1.7 per cent of income was left unspent in the first quarter of 2017, the lowest savings ratio since comparable records began in 1963.

When I was on work permit my savings rate was 50%+: £1k per month into savings account sharpish, no exceptions. My salary was above average too, so what the feck can one save with 1.7% savings rate on average salary???

PurpleGorilla
17th July 2017, 14:30
When I was on work permit my savings rate was 50%+: £1k per month into savings account sharpish, no exceptions. My salary was above average too, so what the feck can one save with 1.7% savings rate on average salary???

QED

scooterscot
17th July 2017, 15:11
Sometimes old processes are not scalable, unreliable, or difficult to maintain.

Typical thick remoaner.

That's why new more efficient competitive ones are made.

Typical thick Brexit snowflake.

tarbera
18th July 2017, 02:52
More on David Davis

https://www.google.co.uk/amp/www.standard.co.uk/news/politics/david-davis-as-thick-as-mince-and-lazy-as-a-toad-says-former-vote-leave-chief-dominic-cummings-a3590086.html%3Famp