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SimonMac
11th September 2017, 12:43
Cycling: Groups call for action on 'car-dooring' - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-41219977)

If I as a driver undertake another vehicle I am in the wrong, why is it encouraged for cyclists to do the opposite of all other road users.

NickFitz
11th September 2017, 12:45
It's quite an interesting career if you're not squeamish about dealing with dead people and grieving relatives.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTCg6PGaOkM

Not sure whether people who use a certain mode of transport are given preferential treatment, though :confused:

MarillionFan
11th September 2017, 12:46
Cycling: Groups call for action on 'car-dooring' - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-41219977)

If I as a driver undertake another vehicle I am in the wrong, why is it encouraged for cyclists to do the opposite of all other road users.

Okay............. That's exactly what this article was about.:eyes

Platypus
11th September 2017, 12:53
It's quite an interesting career if you're not squeamish about dealing with dead people and grieving relatives.

Yep, I loved Dexter too :happy

SueEllen
11th September 2017, 12:54
It is actually called "filtering".

Both cyclists and motorcyclist are allowed to do so. Motorcyclists due to the fact they travel faster tend to do it on the right hand side, while cyclists do it on the left hand side due to the fact they travel slower, and the fact cycle and bus lanes are on that side also.

DaveB
11th September 2017, 12:57
Cycling: Groups call for action on 'car-dooring' - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-41219977)

If I as a driver undertake another vehicle I am in the wrong, why is it encouraged for cyclists to do the opposite of all other road users.

Doesn't just apply to passengers opening doors, drivers do it as well.

And if the cyclist was in a cycle lane at the time then they are legitimately undertaking.

If the traffic was stationary at the time, and you'd have to hope it was if they were opening doors, then it's not undertaking, it's filtering and the HWC is less prescriptive about that. It doesn't specifically prohibit it and includes references to extra care being required from drivers when cyclists or motor cyclists maybe be filtering through stationary traffic. c.f. Rule 160 and Rule 211.

rl4engc
11th September 2017, 13:13
I'd be more interested to know why they think it's acceptable to go through a red light, as long as they

a) Look left and right to make sure there's a gap big enough for them to go across the junction, (or)
b) put one or both feet down for a bit before carrying on cycling, to make them look a bit more 'pedestrian'.

DaveB
11th September 2017, 13:22
I'd be more interested to know why they think it's acceptable to go through a red light, as long as they

a) Look left and right to make sure there's a gap big enough for them to go across the junction, (or)
b) put one or both feet down for a bit before carrying on cycling, to make them look a bit more 'pedestrian'.

For the same reason some car drivers do it, or turn without signalling, or open doors without looking, or use their phones while driving, the same reason pedestrians cross roads against the lights. Because they are twats.

Twats ride bikes, twats drive cars, and lorries, and motor cycles, and walk.

ladymuck
11th September 2017, 13:25
This was a good read (https://www.waterstones.com/book/smoke-gets-in-your-eyes/caitlin-doughty/9781782111054) about the crematorium industry (in the states). Some of it was a bit self indulgent but overall interesting

barrydidit
11th September 2017, 13:27
Cycling: Groups call for action on 'car-dooring' - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-41219977)

If I as a driver undertake another vehicle I am in the wrong, why is it encouraged for cyclists to do the opposite of all other road users.

Buy a bike and go find out.

BoredBloke
11th September 2017, 13:31
Edinburgh has a 20 mph sped limit covering all of the city. I was undertaken by a cyclist last week because he was simply pedaling faster than the speed limit

barrydidit
11th September 2017, 13:34
I like doing that too. Best of all is to set off those speed traps that display your speed in green if it's under the limit and red if it's over the limit.

Big Blue Plymouth
11th September 2017, 13:35
I can't believe the way some people take their lives in their hands riding through the middle of Bristol every morning. Some of those roundabouts are deathtraps for cycles & I've even seen them towing kids in buggies.

Stupid really because there's no need - the pavements are dual use but I guess they CBA to navigate all the pelican crossings to get across safely.

SueEllen
11th September 2017, 15:42
Buy a bike and go find out.

Oh god - not another shitty male cyclist on the road. You know he will be one, because he's shitty about driving.

Jog On
11th September 2017, 15:48
Oh god - not another tulipty male cyclist on the road. You know he will be one, because he's tulipty about driving.

Does this world need any more MAMILs? Can we afford any more MAMILs?

tiggat
12th September 2017, 12:49
Cycling: Groups call for action on 'car-dooring' - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-41219977)

If I as a driver undertake another vehicle I am in the wrong, why is it encouraged for cyclists to do the opposite of all other road users.

because the cycle lane is on the left part of the road?

SueEllen
12th September 2017, 13:27
because the cycle lane is on the left part of the road?

Don't worry he's a fool.

northernladyuk
12th September 2017, 13:31
I am not sure where I stand on this,
but when I do make up my mind, I will be very angry about the whole thing.

NotAllThere
13th September 2017, 05:48
It is actually called "filtering".

Both cyclists and motorcyclist are allowed to do so. Motorcyclists due to the fact they travel faster tend to do it on the right hand side, while cyclists do it on the left hand side due to the fact they travel slower, and the fact cycle and bus lanes are on that side also.Be aware, if you're abroad, filtering is not legal in all countries.

Most cyclists ride perfectly safely, obeying the rules of the road. We only notice the small minority who don't. Same with crap car drivers. This gives rise to cognitive bias - all cyclists/car drivers are suicidal/murderous idiots.

SueEllen
13th September 2017, 08:11
Be aware, if you're abroad, filtering is not legal in all countries.

There is no need to in lots of other European countries as they have lots of cycle lanes which don't have parked cars in them or aren't next to the door zone.

TheCyclingProgrammer
13th September 2017, 08:27
It’s called filtering.

Filtering should obviously be done with care and only through stationary and slow moving traffic. I do see some cyclists filtering through traffic when it’s impossible to see what’s happening ahead (eg if you’re stuck behind a large vehicle) and doing other risky things like going up the inside of a bus but done properly filtering is perfectly safe and legal.

My personal preference is to filter and overtake on the right whenever possible but you have to consider that cycling infrastructure in this country does little to encourage this. Where do they put cycle lanes and bike box entry lanes at lights? On the left hand side.

Filtering on either side still puts you at risk of being doored unless you leave sufficient space.

Big Blue Plymouth
13th September 2017, 08:30
Filtering on either side still puts you at risk of being doored unless you leave sufficient space.

And on the left you end up riding through all the crud in the gutter resulting in punctures galore.

ContractorOnAMotorbike
13th September 2017, 08:59
It is actually called "filtering".

Both cyclists and motorcyclist are allowed to do so. Motorcyclists due to the fact they travel faster tend to do it on the right hand side, while cyclists do it on the left hand side due to the fact they travel slower, and the fact cycle and bus lanes are on that side also.

Honest question... If cyclists filter on the left as opposed to the middle like motorcyclists because they are usually slower which is fair enough; are they supposed to give way to motor vehicles at junctions? Give way to a car or lorry turning left for instance?

As a motorcyclist and car driver i always check for cycles before turning but what is the cyclist's responsibility in this scenario?

BR14
13th September 2017, 09:12
Honest question... If cyclists filter on the left as opposed to the middle like motorcyclists because they are usually slower which is fair enough; are they supposed to give way to motor vehicles at junctions? Give way to a car or lorry turning left for instance?

As a motorcyclist and car driver i always check for cycles before turning but what is the cyclist's responsibility in this scenario?

cyclist's responsibility?? - that's an oxymoron if i ever heard one.

NotAllThere
13th September 2017, 09:36
There is no need to in lots of other European countries as they have lots of cycle lanes which don't have parked cars in them or aren't next to the door zone.There are plenty of streets that get congested that don't have cycle lanes. Filter one of those, and you're liable to get a ticket.

SueEllen
13th September 2017, 09:37
Honest question... If cyclists filter on the left as opposed to the middle like motorcyclists because they are usually slower which is fair enough; are they supposed to give way to motor vehicles at junctions? Give way to a car or lorry turning left for instance?

As a motorcyclist and car driver i always check for cycles before turning but what is the cyclist's responsibility in this scenario?

Not to get killed.

If you see a vehicle indicating left it's in front of you so you stay behind it.

If it is a lorry or a bus you don't filter down the left of it. linky (https://lcc.org.uk/pages/lorries)

SueEllen
13th September 2017, 09:58
There are plenty of streets that get congested that don't have cycle lanes. Filter one of those, and you're liable to get a ticket.

Luckily I'm in the UK then. :p

jds 1981
13th September 2017, 10:07
Honest question... If cyclists filter on the left as opposed to the middle like motorcyclists because they are usually slower which is fair enough; are they supposed to give way to motor vehicles at junctions? Give way to a car or lorry turning left for instance?

As a motorcyclist and car driver i always check for cycles before turning but what is the cyclist's responsibility in this scenario?
It will be the same as for motorcyclists. https://www.bikerandbike.co.uk/filtering-motorbike-whats-law/

Would probably come down to assigning fault, if it was slow moving traffic then the car driver should check mirrors before turning. Mirror, signal then maneuver.
If there's a bike there then you probably need to wait. If busy (London) it might come down to a case of edging out as per normal London special traffic rules...

jds 1981
13th September 2017, 12:06
It will be the same as for motorcyclists. https://www.bikerandbike.co.uk/filtering-motorbike-whats-law/

Would probably come down to assigning fault, if it was slow moving traffic then the car driver should check mirrors before turning. Mirror, signal then maneuver.
If there's a bike there then you probably need to wait. If busy (London) it might come down to a case of edging out as per normal London special traffic rules...

Probably worth comparing it to turning right when you are on your motorbike. Who do you think would have priority then, who if there was an accident would be at fault?

Paddy
14th September 2017, 12:46
Pedestrian dies after Oxford Street cyclist crash

A 73-year-old woman has died after being struck by a cyclist on London's Oxford Street.

Pedestrian dies after Oxford Street cyclist crash - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-41263926)

SueEllen
14th September 2017, 13:44
Pedestrian dies after Oxford Street cyclist crash

A 73-year-old woman has died after being struck by a cyclist on London's Oxford Street.

Pedestrian dies after Oxford Street cyclist crash - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-41263926)

And?

The cyclist hasn't been arrested for knocking her over.

If you knock an old person over in a car - and it is normally an old person - who decides not to use a pedestrian crossing correctly, then if you stop but aren't drunk, otherwise intoxicated or clearly speeding, and don't behave like a complete dick you are likely not to get arrested let alone prosecuted.

Snarf
15th September 2017, 19:40
I can't believe the way some people take their lives in their hands riding through the middle of Bristol every morning. Some of those roundabouts are deathtraps for cycles & I've even seen them towing kids in buggies.

Stupid really because there's no need - the pavements are dual use but I guess they CBA to navigate all the pelican crossings to get across safely.

Dual use pavements are a terrible idea.

My average speed when having a leisurely cycle home is around 15Km/h if I'm in a bit of a rush rush I can hit 30 easily with bursts a bit faster if needed.

I weigh 85Kg, the bike, laptop bag etc easily round that up to 100Kg travelling at ~ 20Km/h.

That's 100Kg at 12Mph... fast enough and heavy enough to do some damage to us both...

Snarf
15th September 2017, 19:47
Cycling: Groups call for action on 'car-dooring' - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-41219977)

If I as a driver undertake another vehicle I am in the wrong, why is it encouraged for cyclists to do the opposite of all other road users.

Well, no.

If you are in crawling/congested traffic and under the speed its perfectly fine to undertake, for example on a three lane motorway in a slow moving jam you would not sit stationary in lane one with a massive gap in front of you because lane two wasn't moving..

I would suggest that if a bike is undertaking you and you are not in slow moving traffic that you are either driving far too slowly or they are breaking the speed limit *

* Very unlikely unless its a very low limit or you're sharing the road with Bradley Wiggins.

Snarf
15th September 2017, 19:53
Pedestrian dies after Oxford Street cyclist crash

A 73-year-old woman has died after being struck by a cyclist on London's Oxford Street.

Pedestrian dies after Oxford Street cyclist crash - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-41263926)

Yeah, but when you look at that in more detail than just the headline you will see that he was riding a track bike (no front brake) which is not legally allowed to be used on the roads... If I was driving a car with 50% of the brakes not working I'd get f*cked for running a pensioner over too!

SueEllen
15th September 2017, 19:56
Yeah, but when you look at that in more detail than just the headline you will see that he was riding a track bike (no front brake) which is not legally allowed to be used on the roads... If I was driving a car with 50% of the brakes not working I'd get f*cked for running a pensioner over too!

Where does it say this guy was riding a track bike?

Likewise during Ride London they stipulate what you must have on your bike and wear on your person as anyone who volunteers, like me, can call the cyclist out.

Watching the London Marathon this year with friends, we had to tell idiots not to cross the road in front of the runners.

SueEllen
15th September 2017, 20:02
Dual use pavements are a terrible idea.

My average speed when having a leisurely cycle home is around 15Km/h if I'm in a bit of a rush rush I can hit 30 easily with bursts a bit faster if needed.

I weigh 85Kg, the bike, laptop bag etc easily round that up to 100Kg travelling at ~ 20Km/h.

That's 100Kg at 12Mph... fast enough and heavy enough to do some damage to us both...

Couldn't agree more.

Though most cyclists in my area and me, myself, do the best not to run people over.

Unfortunately dumb walkers and groups of people are a fecking menace on shared paths.

I have told off people for not paying attention or taking up the entire path whether walking, running or cycling simply because I tend to move faster than lots of people. Teenagers and older people particularly older women are the most clueless.

DaveB
15th September 2017, 20:27
Yeah, but when you look at that in more detail than just the headline you will see that he was riding a track bike (no front brake) which is not legally allowed to be used on the roads... If I was driving a car with 50% of the brakes not working I'd get f*cked for running a pensioner over too!

Wrong story, that was the hipster muppet on Old Street.

This is a separate incident on Oxford Street. No details released yet as to exactly what happened.

Snarf
15th September 2017, 20:50
Where does it say this guy was riding a track bike?

Likewise during Ride London they stipulate what you must have on your bike and wear on your person as anyone who volunteers, like me, can call the cyclist out.

Watching the London Marathon this year with friends, we had to tell idiots not to cross the road in front of the runners.

Sorry, Looking at it now, its not the same case, the one I was talking about was not a pensioner :

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/aug/23/ex-courier-charlie-alliston-convicted-for-mowing-down-kim-briggs-on-his-track-bike

SueEllen
15th September 2017, 21:38
Sorry, Looking at it now, its not the same case, the one I was talking about was not a pensioner :

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/aug/23/ex-courier-charlie-alliston-convicted-for-mowing-down-kim-briggs-on-his-track-bike

Yeah well he is a Muppet and I'm being polite.