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Laiyer
2nd March 2018, 11:01
I’m on a six month contract within IR35 finishing next week. Have been onsite everyday. Couldn’t get into office today due to train cancellations. My manager saying that I have to take this as leave. I have a laptop, was logged in this morning remotely and working on some documentation.
Is this valid that they demand this?

sal
2nd March 2018, 11:20
Yes

northernladyuk
2nd March 2018, 11:29
I’m on a six month contract within IR35 finishing next week. Have been onsite everyday. Couldn’t get into office today due to train cancellations. My manager saying that I have to take this as leave. I have a laptop, was logged in this morning remotely and working on some documentation.
Is this valid that they demand this?

You could always ignore the manager, work through the day, invoice for the day and then take them to court if the invoice is not paid in full.

cojak
2nd March 2018, 11:32
I’m on a six month contract within IR35 finishing next week. Have been onsite everyday. Couldn’t get into office today due to train cancellations. My manager saying that I have to take this as leave. I have a laptop, was logged in this morning remotely and working on some documentation.
Is this valid that they demand this?

Oh yes, IR35 has nowt to do with it.

BR14
2nd March 2018, 11:32
Another one??? dear, oh dear

clearedforlanding
2nd March 2018, 11:32
You could always ignore the manager, work through the day, invoice for the day and then take them to court if the invoice is not paid in full.

Don't forget to work the weekend & invoice time x 1.5 on Saturday & time x 2 on Sunday as you will be covering for all the permies who did not show up.

sal
2nd March 2018, 11:33
Oh yes, IR35 has nowt to do with it.

Of course it does.

He can sue for employment rights and paid leave :)

northernladyuk
2nd March 2018, 11:34
Don't forget to work the weekend & invoice time x 1.5 on Saturday & time x 2 on Sunday as you will be covering for all the permies who did not show up.

And bill for the extra heating in the house, due to being at home unexpectedly in cold weather.

northernladuk
2nd March 2018, 11:35
Why do people do work at home and then find out their client isn't happy. Why haven't they rung their client at 8am to advise they will WFH and then find out at that point they are not required to do any work?

Deciding to WFH without advising the client is pretty poor relationship management.

northernladyuk
2nd March 2018, 11:35
And bill for the extra heating in the house, due to being at home unexpectedly in cold weather.

In fact, add an extra tenner for my advice and I'll bill you separately. For twenty, the old man will throw in a happy finish.

washed up contractor
2nd March 2018, 11:39
Jesus wept. The OP shows why some good contractors have been pushed out of contracting because hiring managers just take on the bottom feeders instead. The OP didnt go in due to being pissed up and now this?

I might be out of this charade now but it still boils my piss when I spot this stuff.

cojak
2nd March 2018, 11:42
I know this is General, but at least add a :wink when you post that kind of stuff. :)

ladymuck
2nd March 2018, 11:50
Why do people do work at home and then find out their client isn't happy. Why haven't they rung their client at 8am to advise they will WFH and then find out at that point they are not required to do any work?

Deciding to WFH without advising the client is pretty poor relationship management.

Totally agree.

jamesbrown
2nd March 2018, 11:55
Another one??? dear, oh dear

Indeed.

We mustn't mention the unmentionable, but the unmentionable really needs to happen to this twollock.

jamesbrown
2nd March 2018, 11:56
Why do people do work at home and then find out their client isn't happy. Why haven't they rung their client at 8am to advise they will WFH and then find out at that point they are not required to do any work?

Deciding to WFH without advising the client is pretty poor relationship management.

Because Gricer has zero imagination.

ladymuck
2nd March 2018, 12:20
Jesus wept. The OP shows why some good contractors have been pushed out of contracting because hiring managers just take on the bottom feeders instead. The OP didnt go in due to being pissed up and now this?

I might be out of this charade now but it still boils my piss when I spot this stuff.

Different account. Maybe the same person but different user name. Definitely cut from the same cloth

barrydidit
2nd March 2018, 12:24
In fact, add an extra tenner for my advice and I'll bill you separately. For twenty, the old man will throw in a happy finish.

I heard he's frozen to the porcelain in Wigan Wallgate gents, so you'd have to travel to him.

northernladyuk
2nd March 2018, 14:43
I heard he's frozen to the porcelain in Wigan Wallgate gents, so you'd have to travel to him.

He's got a grant for an avant garde installation from the Railway Art Tarts Trust.

barrydidit
2nd March 2018, 14:55
He's got a grant for an avant garde installation from the Railway Art Tarts Trust.

Shades of Emin. I imagine he's written the names of all the accountants he's asked questions of on the trap wall.

northernladyuk
2nd March 2018, 15:18
Shades of Emin. I imagine he's written the names of all the accountants he's asked questions of on the trap wall.

He's turned them into a word search grid.

d000hg
2nd March 2018, 15:21
Why do people do work at home and then find out their client isn't happy. Why haven't they rung their client at 8am to advise they will WFH and then find out at that point they are not required to do any work?

Deciding to WFH without advising the client is pretty poor relationship management.

Spoken like a good little D&C permtractor.

northernladuk
2nd March 2018, 15:36
Spoken like a good little D&C permtractor.

I knew some idiot would come up with that one.

Firstly, many contracts state that at least the agent is made aware early in the morning they will be absent.

Secondly, advising the client you won't be in first thing is a matter of courtesy and manners and has **** all to do with D&C. It also clears up any misconceptions or assumptions that would get the contractor in to the situation they are in. We've got not one, but two posts with the exact same situation. A courtesy call to the client would have cleared both up.

northernladyuk
2nd March 2018, 16:08
I knew some idiot would come up with that one.

Firstly, many contracts state that at least the agent is made aware early in the morning they will be absent.

Secondly, advising the client you won't be in first thing is a matter of courtesy and manners and has **** all to do with D&C. It also clears up any misconceptions or assumptions that would get the contractor in to the situation they are in. We've got not one, but two posts with the exact same situation. A courtesy call to the client would have cleared both up.

Do you ask your accountant before making these phone calls?

northernladuk
2nd March 2018, 16:08
Do you ask your accountant before making these phone calls?

:grey

Lance
2nd March 2018, 18:13
Why do people do work at home and then find out their client isn't happy. Why haven't they rung their client at 8am to advise they will WFH and then find out at that point they are not required to do any work?

Deciding to WFH without advising the client is pretty poor relationship management.

Why do people not broach the WFH question about a week or two into the contract?

I’ve not had anything where I cannot do it for nearly 20 years, and 20 years ago I was setting up WFH systems for my then employer.

Current gig is contracted to WFH and client pays travel and accommodation if I leave the village.

clearedforlanding
2nd March 2018, 18:30
Why do people not broach the WFH question about a week or two into the contract?


Why not BEFORE signing the contract?