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View Full Version : Anyone using RBS?



DimPrawn
21st November 2018, 19:54
Might want to consider another bank after reading this.

RBS customer lost thousands of pounds in scam - BBC News (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-46274644)


A Royal Bank of Scotland customer had more than £4,300 stolen from her account by a fraudulent caller who answered one of her security questions wrongly, BBC Watchdog Live has found.

For more than a year, the bank insisted Charlotte Higman had been aware of the transaction and refused to refund her.

The Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS) backed RBS after the initial complaint. :winker:

But earlier this month, RBS apologised and issued Charlotte a full refund, after Watchdog Live's investigation.

AtW
21st November 2018, 20:15
Shocking - I am truly amazed fraudsters pulled that off - given that parts of RBS going down on regular basis...

DimPrawn
21st November 2018, 20:21
Why don't phone banking services insist on customers using a two-factor authentication, which requires you to put in your debit card into a reader, enter a pin, and generate a secure code for every transaction. Any bank not using two factor authentication should be 100% liable for every fraud.

I bank with Nationwide and any transaction requires the use of this:

http://www.helpmetosave.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/nationwide-card-reader-close-up.jpg

AtW
21st November 2018, 20:31
Your ex-wife left you money worth stealing?

:eyes

DimPrawn
21st November 2018, 20:37
Your ex-wife left you money worth stealing?

:eyes

Enough for me to nip downstairs and buy a shish kebab whenever I feel like it.

greenlake
21st November 2018, 20:40
I bank with Nationwide and any transaction requires the use of this:

http://www.helpmetosave.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/nationwide-card-reader-close-up.jpg

I use something similar to that....

http://i.imgur.com/VUyzRwy.jpg

AtW
21st November 2018, 20:41
Enough for me to nip downstairs and buy a shish kebab whenever I feel like it.

I knew you got skewered

:hug:

Mordac
22nd November 2018, 13:32
Why don't phone banking services insist on customers using a two-factor authentication, which requires you to put in your debit card into a reader, enter a pin, and generate a secure code for every transaction. Any bank not using two factor authentication should be 100% liable for every fraud.

I bank with Nationwide and any transaction requires the use of this:

http://www.helpmetosave.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/nationwide-card-reader-close-up.jpg

I have a similar Barclays device. I used to use RBS, but they were beyond crap. So much so that I ditched them before the end of the 2 year fee-free period. I'd rather pay for a decent service than put up with RBS. :mad

fiisch
22nd November 2018, 14:12
I'm still waiting on the FOS to rule on my CashPlus complaint... Card was used for £6k fraudulently. :mad

AtW
22nd November 2018, 15:13
I'm still waiting on the FOS to rule on my CashPlus complaint... Card was used for £6k fraudulently. :mad

With PIn used?

fiisch
22nd November 2018, 16:10
With PIn used?

Yup, unfortunately so...

AtW
22nd November 2018, 16:35
Yup, unfortunately so...

With PIN you are fecked basically - the main motivation for introducing it wasn't combat fraud, but to shift liability to the end user (you).

NigelJK
23rd November 2018, 11:03
According to the actual broadcast, the crims managed a 'divert' the phone back from the bank. A point they skipped over as if it were a 'normal' event. Having said that the drone on the phone ignored the warning from the speech recognition software that the caller was fake.

Hobosapien
1st December 2018, 09:09
Why don't phone banking services insist on customers using a two-factor authentication, which requires you to put in your debit card into a reader, enter a pin, and generate a secure code for every transaction. Any bank not using two factor authentication should be 100% liable for every fraud.

I bank with Nationwide and any transaction requires the use of this:

http://www.helpmetosave.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/nationwide-card-reader-close-up.jpg


Banks starting to roll-out two-factor authentication in the form of one-time passcode texted to your mobile when doing online shopping.

Want to shop online? Best have a mobile signal - BBC News (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-46399707)


One bank that has started sending passwords to mobiles is First Direct. It advised anyone having difficulties to get in touch with them.

"We do have alternative processes for customers who cannot use this method, and they may be required to call us to authenticate," a spokesperson said.

:facepalm: "I would call but if I had a mobile signal I'd have received the passcode in the first place"

How many people live somewhere with internet (to do the online shopping) but no mobile signal?

:tumble:

Anonimouse
1st December 2018, 16:58
Or such slow broadband that the code has timed out by the time it had uploaded, and no mobile signal

Hobosapien
2nd December 2018, 10:35
I've used the Authy (https://authy.com/) app for two-factor authentication on some sites so not sure why such an approach can't be used for banking as it works offline afaik, similar to those banking devices pictured up thread.

Texting and phone calls is so last decade. Get with the times banking IT people. :rolleyes:

scooterscot
2nd December 2018, 11:20
Why don't phone banking services insist on customers using a two-factor authentication, which requires you to put in your debit card into a reader, enter a pin, and generate a secure code for every transaction. Any bank not using two factor authentication should be 100% liable for every fraud.

I bank with Nationwide and any transaction requires the use of this:

http://www.helpmetosave.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/nationwide-card-reader-close-up.jpg


Happen to use them too. Pain in the bum when you've lost the card reader though.

Eirikur
3rd December 2018, 15:11
Why don't phone banking services insist on customers using a two-factor authentication, which requires you to put in your debit card into a reader, enter a pin, and generate a secure code for every transaction. Any bank not using two factor authentication should be 100% liable for every fraud.

I bank with Nationwide and any transaction requires the use of this:

http://www.helpmetosave.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/nationwide-card-reader-close-up.jpg

That's not true. If you paid someone before you don't have to use it (up to a certain amount I hope) so far I could transfer several 100s of pounds using my mobile app without using the security code thingy

minestrone
3rd December 2018, 16:27
They call people up and ask then to read out the numbers from the reader.

No matter how much you try to engineer a secure system the people using it have a reasonable chance of being morons.

AtW
3rd December 2018, 16:45
If only this country had a security service that can identify creeps who abuse phone lines and then send a physical pursvuasion unit to deal with them...