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NotAllThere
19th December 2018, 16:10
Last night split beer over my laptop. And it was my (nearly full) last bottle. :tantrum:

Oh yeah, my laptop was damaged as well. But got a new one in the morning.

Old Greg
19th December 2018, 19:05
Last night split beer over my laptop. And it was my (nearly full) last bottle. :tantrum:

Oh yeah, my laptop was damaged as well. But got a new one in the morning.

Project Fear. No beer was spilt and the laptop is fine.

BR14
19th December 2018, 19:06
aye, well beer's more expensive than laptops in swizzyland, so you would be understandably upset :smokin

NotAllThere
19th December 2018, 20:16
Found some Guinness cans. And once my laptop had dried out, it worked ok - if a little sticky. Still, it was time for a new one.

vetran
19th December 2018, 22:25
Project Fear. No beer was spilt and the laptop is fine.
No that's Project EU Army, EU migrant disaster or Eire hard border, deny it happened call everyone liars, cretin and racists.

Old Greg
19th December 2018, 22:28
No that's Project EU Army, EU migrant disaster or Eire hard border, deny it happened call everyone liars, cretin and racists.

Why do you call Ireland 'Eire'? It's like saying 'Espana' instead of Spain. It's a very odd practice.

vetran
19th December 2018, 22:35
Why do you call Ireland 'Eire'? It's like saying 'Espana' instead of Spain. It's a very odd practice.


Well that is what its called. Southern Ireland seems a bit confrontational like South Korea. Ireland is the Island and calling it that seems a bit offensive to the North as well as confusing.


Article 4 of the Constitution of Ireland (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_of_Ireland), adopted in 1937, provides that "[t]he name of the State is Éire, or, in the English language, Ireland".[3] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_of_the_Irish_state#cite_note-3) Hence, the Irish state has two official names, Éire (in Irish (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_(language))) and Ireland (in English (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_(language))).

I could call it the Republic of Ireland but that seems like a communist state.

No I suspect you are the expert in very odd practice at least according to NLyUK.

TwoWolves
20th December 2018, 00:47
No that's Project EU Army, EU migrant disaster or Eire hard border, deny it happened call everyone liars, cretin and racists.

I notice that the British press and those who wish the b-word be gone are also studiously ignoring the "Yellow Jacket" protests in France as if it has nothing to do with the project.

woohoo
20th December 2018, 06:53
Last night split beer over my laptop. And it was my (nearly full) last bottle. :tantrum:

Oh yeah, my laptop was damaged as well. But got a new one in the morning.

Sounds like someone got a little overexcited browsing the internet whilst drunk. And you say the laptop is a little sticky now??

mudskipper
20th December 2018, 06:55
Well that is what its called. Southern Ireland seems a bit confrontational like South Korea. Ireland is the Island and calling it that seems a bit offensive to the North as well as confusing.



I could call it the Republic of Ireland but that seems like a communist state.

No I suspect you are the expert in very odd practice at least according to NLyUK.

Is the country's official name not just Ireland?

A bit like Sudan and South Sudan.

mudskipper
20th December 2018, 06:56
Is the country's official name not just Ireland?

A bit like Sudan and South Sudan.

Yes -

Ireland - Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ireland)

"Politically, Ireland is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom."

Old Greg
20th December 2018, 07:36
Well that is what its called. Southern Ireland seems a bit confrontational like South Korea. Ireland is the Island and calling it that seems a bit offensive to the North as well as confusing.



I could call it the Republic of Ireland but that seems like a communist state.

No I suspect you are the expert in very odd practice at least according to NLyUK.

The country is called 'Éire' in the Irish language and Ireland in the English language. You don't say 'Espana' when speaking English so why say 'Eire'? The island is also called 'Éire' in the Irish language and 'Ireland' in English, so using the term 'Éire' doesn't help distinguish between the country and the island.

Where there is confusion between the state of Ireland and the island of Ireland, the term 'Republic of Ireland' clarifies (this is the term used in the UK's Ireland Act of 1949 and is also seen sometimes on official government documentation). The rather clumsy term 'island of Ireland' is the equivalent term to clarify.

Southern Ireland was a short lived country in the 1920s, so it is incorrect to use the term in the contemporary context. The Irish Republic is also a historical term, referring to a short lived French revolutionary backed administration and then later the revolutionary state declared in 1916, which was only recognised internationally by the USSR. The term is probably still used by some dissident republicans who don't accept the legitimacy of the Anglo Irish treaty partitioning Ireland.

So in summary, stick to 'Ireland' or the ' Republic of Ireland' if you want to be accurate.

If you are worried that 'Ireland' will offend some people in Northern Ireland, you can equalise this by using the term 'Northern Ireland' to people from the Republic of Ireland. Some will be offended (e.g. because the northernmost point in the island of Ireland is in the Republic), but it's the accurate term. The term 'Ulster' is incorrect for 'Northern Ireland' as Ulster contains three counties from the Republic. The term 'six counties' is a republican term used to denote illegitimacy for Northern Ireland. The term 'twenty-six counties' is occasionally used by republicans to denote illegitimacy for the Republic of Ireland.

NotAllThere
20th December 2018, 08:13
Why do you call Ireland 'Eire'? It's like saying 'Espana' instead of Spain. It's a very odd practice.To be fair I grew up calling it Eire - I think it even had that on maps.


I notice that the British press and those who wish the b-word be gone are also studiously ignoring the "Yellow Jacket" protests in France as if it has nothing to do with the project.Rubbish. It has been all over the Times and the Sunday Times since it began. It was even referenced on Have I Got News For You last Friday.

Old Greg
20th December 2018, 09:22
To be fair I grew up calling it Eire - I think it even had that on maps.



That is why I am being nice. Just trying to educate.

MarillionFan
20th December 2018, 09:27
Last night split beer over my laptop. And it was my (nearly full) last bottle. :tantrum:

Oh yeah, my laptop was damaged as well. But got a new one in the morning.
Tut tut tut.

If you’re going to drink while in charge of a computer this is bound to happen. Have you thought about giving up alcohol, it’s one of the devils tools you know?

Old Greg
20th December 2018, 10:05
Tut tut tut.

If you’re going to drink while in charge of a computer this is bound to happen. Have you thought about giving up alcohol, it’s one of the devils tools you know?

The problem is the morning drink while the hands are shaking. That's why the experts pour the night before and use a straw. Saves the teeth as well as the lappy.

greenlake
20th December 2018, 15:23
Last night split beer over my laptop. And it was my (nearly full) last bottle. :tantrum:

Oh yeah, my laptop was damaged as well. But got a new one in the morning.

*Sigh* When will people learn....? :rolleyes:

http://i.imgur.com/DW5SsP7.jpg

vetran
20th December 2018, 22:28
Sounds like someone got a little overexcited browsing the internet whilst drunk. And you say the laptop is a little sticky now??


So I'm not the only one who thinks likes that sort of extracurricular activity?

vetran
20th December 2018, 22:32
The country is called 'Éire' in the Irish language and Ireland in the English language. You don't say 'Espana' when speaking English so why say 'Eire'? The island is also called 'Éire' in the Irish language and 'Ireland' in English, so using the term 'Éire' doesn't help distinguish between the country and the island.

Where there is confusion between the state of Ireland and the island of Ireland, the term 'Republic of Ireland' clarifies (this is the term used in the UK's Ireland Act of 1949 and is also seen sometimes on official government documentation). The rather clumsy term 'island of Ireland' is the equivalent term to clarify.

Southern Ireland was a short lived country in the 1920s, so it is incorrect to use the term in the contemporary context. The Irish Republic is also a historical term, referring to a short lived French revolutionary backed administration and then later the revolutionary state declared in 1916, which was only recognised internationally by the USSR. The term is probably still used by some dissident republicans who don't accept the legitimacy of the Anglo Irish treaty partitioning Ireland.

So in summary, stick to 'Ireland' or the ' Republic of Ireland' if you want to be accurate.

If you are worried that 'Ireland' will offend some people in Northern Ireland, you can equalise this by using the term 'Northern Ireland' to people from the Republic of Ireland. Some will be offended (e.g. because the northernmost point in the island of Ireland is in the Republic), but it's the accurate term. The term 'Ulster' is incorrect for 'Northern Ireland' as Ulster contains three counties from the Republic. The term 'six counties' is a republican term used to denote illegitimacy for Northern Ireland. The term 'twenty-six counties' is occasionally used by republicans to denote illegitimacy for the Republic of Ireland.




Indeed a bunch of bitchy little girls!

I'l use Eire still.

For Espana I will use Spain and Catalonia + Gibraltar for those areas they wish were theirs!

vetran
20th December 2018, 22:38
Tut tut tut.

If you’re going to drink while in charge of a computer this is bound to happen. Have you thought about giving up alcohol, it’s one of the devils tools you know?


oh blimey you have turned to religion!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSq1R3TPrZI

mudskipper
20th December 2018, 23:13
The problem is the morning drink while the hands are shaking. That's why the experts pour the night before and use a straw. Saves the teeth as well as the lappy.

I worked for a wine company for several years. Talking to the buyers - sounds like a dream job - they were having real dentistry problems.

Never swill before you swallow.