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VectraMan
16th August 2007, 08:04
Disapointing effort from the BBC so far:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/6946728.stm

richard-af
16th August 2007, 08:06
A-Level Day. So called, because everyone gets an "A"... in every subject. Next stop: Uni to do Basket Weaving & Meeja Studies. Double-First virtually in the bag for all.

Xenophon
16th August 2007, 08:07
Agreed.

Xenophon
16th August 2007, 08:08
Disapointing effort from the BBC so far:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/6946728.stm

Yup. Last year's shots were much better.

richard-af
16th August 2007, 08:12
From that linky:

Some universities have said that exam grades are no longer sufficient for them to use to select undergraduates.
Sounds both right & worrying.

Exam officials are stressing the hard work and determination that students have put in to earn their results this year.
Crap.

Moscow Mule
16th August 2007, 08:16
A-Level Day. So called, because everyone gets an "A"... in every subject. Next stop: Uni to do Basket Weaving & Meeja Studies. Double-First virtually in the bag for all.

I really do lament of NL and their "problem solving". Every young adult is not suited to higher education, yet NL insist on pushing them to remain in school/college/uni as long as possible.

It's a shame because folk who work hard get put down by comments like the above.

My brother has worked his arse off trying to pass Maths, Further Maths, Physics & Chemistry basically on his own as the scholl he went to was so crap. We'll find out today whether Cambridge is going to happen or not.

Moscow Mule
16th August 2007, 08:18
Exam officials are stressing the hard work and determination that students have put in to earn their results this year.
Crap.

**** off, could you get 80% on an a-level maths paper today? Probably not without a fair bit of hard work.

richard-af
16th August 2007, 08:24
**** off, could you get 80% on an a-level maths paper today? Probably not without a fair bit of hard work.

Ah! But 80%, according to most A-Level maths pupils, is 0.8/10, so yes, I could achieve that.

Your kids getting their results, today, are they?

Methuselah
16th August 2007, 08:25
**** off, could you get 80% on an a-level maths paper today? Probably not without a fair bit of hard work.Quite so. I have been tutoring someone in A-level maths, someone very good, I'm happy to say. Not only does it still require real intelligence and real work; there is stuff in there that I didn't do until university (or in some embarrassing cases, skipped at university).

Moscow Mule
16th August 2007, 08:26
Brother gets results today (Maths, Further Maths, Physics & Chemistry). If he doesn't get into Cambridge then he's going to have to go to Durham. Poor little sod.

richard-af
16th August 2007, 08:28
I really do lament of NL and their "problem solving". Every young adult is not suited to higher education, yet NL insist on pushing them to remain in school/college/uni as long as possible.

It's a shame because folk who work hard get put down by comments like the above.

My brother has worked his arse off trying to pass Maths, Further Maths, Physics & Chemistry basically on his own as the scholl he went to was so crap. We'll find out today whether Cambridge is going to happen or not.

I am very sorry, but the standards have fallen. Fact. The Unis are saying so, and they have a handle on this sort of thing. I am able to say that with a clear conscience, as I don't have kids.

I do feel sorry for the bright ones, and they deserve to be praised.

It must be bloody frustrating for them to see their considerably dimmer pals also getting top-notch grades.

MrRobin
16th August 2007, 08:28
...on his own as the scholl he went to was so crap.

Perhaps if he went to an institute for learning rather than a footware manufacturer then he might have had better luck?

...IGMC

richard-af
16th August 2007, 08:34
Perhaps if he went to an institute for learning rather than a footware manufacturer then he might have had better luck?

...IGMC

:banana:

Methuselah
16th August 2007, 08:36
I am very sorry, but the standards have fallen. Fact. The Unis are saying so, and they have a handle on this sort of thing. I am able to say that with a clear conscience, as I don't have kids.

I do feel sorry for the bright ones, and they deserve to be praised.

It must be bloody frustrating for them to see their considerably dimmer pals also getting top-notch grades.For the sake of logical precision, I will point out that the Unis are not saying exactly that, not in the quoted BBC article anyway.

They are saying that it is harder to select on the basis of A-level results, which you are guessing means that standards have fallen. But it might come from pupils' standards having risen, so that more of them now get As: so that the number with As no longer corresponds to the number that the Unis want to take in.

richard-af
16th August 2007, 08:38
For the sake of logical precision, I will point out that the Unis are not saying exactly that, not in the quoted BBC article anyway.

They are saying that it is harder to select on the basis of A-level results, which you are guessing means that standards have fallen. But it might come from pupils' standards having risen, so that more of them now get As: so that the number with As no longer corresponds to the number that the Unis want to take in.

Yeah, right!

Methuselah
16th August 2007, 08:40
Brother gets results today (Maths, Further Maths, Physics & Chemistry). If he doesn't get into Cambridge then he's going to have to go to Durham. Poor little sod.Durham is a fine university. It should not automatically be seen as second to Cambridge.

PRC1964
16th August 2007, 08:42
Nice effort by Reuters:

http://uk.reuters.com/article/domesticNews/idUKL1526401120070815

Methuselah
16th August 2007, 08:42
Yeah, right!I am not asserting what is fact about standards; merely pointing out that you are wrong in your reading. :tongue

Xenophon
16th August 2007, 08:43
Nice effort by Reuters:

http://uk.reuters.com/article/domesticNews/idUKL1526401120070815
Now that is good.

VectraMan
16th August 2007, 08:47
Nice effort by Reuters:

http://uk.reuters.com/article/domesticNews/idUKL1526401120070815

That's more like it.

Good to see somebody is keeping this thread on topic.;)

Scaroth of the Jagaroth
16th August 2007, 08:49
Mixed effort by Sky News

http://news.sky.com/skynews/article/0,,30100-1280104,00.html

Moscow Mule
16th August 2007, 10:03
Yeah, right!

Cynic mode today then...

ChimpMaster
16th August 2007, 10:17
I once knew a girl who did A-levels. :tongue

Xenophon
16th August 2007, 10:49
I once knew a girl who did A-levels. :tongue
I see what you have done there...

:devil

sasguru
16th August 2007, 11:31
I once knew a girl who did A-levels. :tongue

I've known a few ...

TheFaQQer
16th August 2007, 12:39
I really do lament of NL and their "problem solving". Every young adult is not suited to higher education, yet NL insist on pushing them to remain in school/college/uni as long as possible.

It's a shame because folk who work hard get put down by comments like the above.

My brother has worked his arse off trying to pass Maths, Further Maths, Physics & Chemistry basically on his own as the scholl he went to was so crap. We'll find out today whether Cambridge is going to happen or not.

I don't understand why they don't just mark on a grade curve, i.e. the top 5% get an A, next 10% get a B etc. etc. That way, the best always stand out.

richard-af
16th August 2007, 12:50
I don't understand why they don't just mark on a grade curve, i.e. the top 5% get an A, next 10% get a B etc. etc. That way, the best always stand out.

Nobody in Education can do fractions or percentages. Anyway, EVERYONE has to pass with flying colours... new rules.

Ardesco
16th August 2007, 12:51
I don't understand why they don't just mark on a grade curve, i.e. the top 5% get an A, next 10% get a B etc. etc. That way, the best always stand out.

Ah but that is not fair because the top 5% one year may not be a good as the top 50% were the previous year!!!

Moscow Mule
16th August 2007, 13:04
I don't understand why they don't just mark on a grade curve, i.e. the top 5% get an A, next 10% get a B etc. etc. That way, the best always stand out.

Because you should be measured against a set standard, not everybody else in your year.

I managed to get an B at GCSE English this way, but I still start sentences with "Because".

Spartacus
16th August 2007, 13:05
I don't understand why they don't just mark on a grade curve, i.e. the top 5% get an A, next 10% get a B etc. etc. That way, the best always stand out.
That's what they used to do. However, it is true to say that makes comparison between years difficult and/or meaningless.

NickFitz
16th August 2007, 13:14
Surprisingly strong showing from The Grauniad's image server (http://image.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2007/08/16/exams8.jpg) :smile

VectraMan
16th August 2007, 13:36
That's what they used to do. However, it is true to say that makes comparison between years difficult and/or meaningless.

That's partly true anyway, as it's a different exam every year.

richard-af
16th August 2007, 13:37
Torygraph offering a bit of competition:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/08/16/nalevel716.xml&CMP=KNC-umknc01_ne_1_ggl_BrGB&HBX_PK=a+level+results&HBX_OU=50

richard-af
16th August 2007, 13:40
Nice effort by Reuters:

http://uk.reuters.com/article/domesticNews/idUKL1526401120070815

Naughty Reuters! That's an old piccy. Obviously brought back out from under the mattress for today's superb achievements.

BoredBloke
16th August 2007, 13:49
From the article

"Melanie Slade, footballer Theo Walcott's girlfriend, scored two Bs and a C"

Are those her grades or does it mean Theos' balls and cock? Fnaarrr fnarrr!

"That's what they used to do. However, it is true to say that makes comparison between years difficult and/or meaningless. "

No it doesn't. Those in the top 5% will always be in the top 5%. The problem here is that this lot wanted to show an improvement, so they had to change the way the grades were set and effectively degrade all other a levels in the process. We now have some a levels where 96% pass the exam. How thick do you have to be to be in the bottom 4%?

richard-af
16th August 2007, 13:55
From the article

"Melanie Slade, footballer Theo Walcott's girlfriend, scored two Bs and a C"

That's a 2 C.S.E. Grade 3s and an unplaced, for us old-timers.

TheFaQQer
16th August 2007, 14:14
"Melanie Slade, footballer Theo Walcott's girlfriend, scored two Bs and a C"

Are those her grades or does it mean Theos' balls and cock?


:laugh

TheFaQQer
16th August 2007, 14:16
Ah but that is not fair because the top 5% one year may not be a good as the top 50% were the previous year!!!

Whoever told you life was fair was lying.


Because you should be measured against a set standard, not everybody else in your year.

I managed to get an B at GCSE English this way, but I still start sentences with "Because".

Why?

It seems to work OK for a lot of university degrees, where the mark on a curve - if it's good enough for Harvard, why not for A levels and GCSEs?

Ardesco
16th August 2007, 15:07
Whoever told you life was fair was lying.


I think you missed the point of my post :)

Gonzo
16th August 2007, 21:27
That's what they used to do. However, it is true to say that makes comparison between years difficult and/or meaningless.I think using the standard distribution approach should be fine. If there are easier papers some years than the others then the better people will just do better. How well anyone does at A Level is surely a combination of brains, effort and personality? Saying that the distribution of those is going to be different between people born in different years in my book is akin to believing in Chinese horoscopes.









Oh yeah, I was born in the year of the pig, and I think that I have all the "pig characteristics":D

bobhope
17th August 2007, 06:05
Last year 24.1% were awarded the top A grade - up 1.3 percentage points and an improvement for the 24th year in a row.

I could buy gradual improvement over time (maybe) but every single year no drops without fail.

It's stretching credibility a little bit.

BoredBloke
17th August 2007, 11:26
Overall only 3% failed the A-levels. That isn't an exam. How can you set an exam where you are virtually guaranteed to pass? How thick must you be to me in the bottom 3%

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/6949084.stm

Sysman
17th August 2007, 12:20
Surprisingly strong showing from The Grauniad's image server (http://image.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2007/08/16/exams8.jpg) :smile
They didn't offer A levels in levitation in my day!