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View Full Version : The Swiss have got it right



DimPrawn
13th September 2007, 12:36
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/6992670.stm

Switzerland has Europe's toughest naturalisation laws. Foreigners must live for 12 years in a Swiss community before they can apply, and being born in Switzerland brings no right to citizenship.

Sounds like a very sensible and reasonable approach to me.

Does that make me a Nazi?

Old Greg
13th September 2007, 12:38
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/6992670.stm
Does that make me a Nazi?

No

RightLaugh
13th September 2007, 12:40
yes

buffdaddy
13th September 2007, 12:41
I have a half swiss and half chinese friend. She doesn't speak german or french and look like she is from south east asia.

She is 28 and only went to swiss for the first time a couple of years ago. Yet she holds a swiss passport.

go figure

scooterscot
13th September 2007, 13:23
Something the Norwegians do not have right...

This Monday was local election day here in Bergen. And just to make sure citizens were of sound mind and judgement, no alcohol sales were allowed. The vine store was shut , beer on the shelf's were covered :eek:

I nearly dried up...

NotAllThere
13th September 2007, 13:28
Does that make me a Nazi?

Yes: http://news.independent.co.uk/europe/article2938940.ece

lilelvis2000
13th September 2007, 13:28
What happends to people who are born in Swiss but their parent's country doesn't recognise them either. What passport do they hold?

Old Greg
13th September 2007, 13:30
What happends to people who are born in Swiss but their parent's country doesn't recognise them either. What passport do they hold?

I think they are stateless - I think there was a case of this.

NotAllThere
13th September 2007, 13:33
They are, and they'll hold papers which allow them some scope to travel. In Switzerland they'll also have residency permits and possibly work permits.

It's pretty easy to travel to neighbouring countries on just the residency permit, though not strictly allowed.

Robster
13th September 2007, 13:34
I feel the need to be slightly pedantic at this point and point out that the name of the country in question is "Switzerland"

lilelvis2000
13th September 2007, 13:43
I think they are stateless - I think there was a case of this.

I did hear of a case of this but could not remember where. If memory serves me right - the man in question ended up in limbo in an airport, unable to leave nor able to enter the country.

Old Greg
13th September 2007, 13:45
I did hear of a case of this but could not remember where. If memory serves me right - the man in question ended up in limbo in an airport, unable to leave nor able to enter the country.

That's the guy at Paris Charles de Gaulle.

Dundeegeorge
13th September 2007, 13:45
I did hear of a case of this but could not remember where. If memory serves me right - the man in question ended up in limbo in an airport, unable to leave nor able to enter the country.

putting up house prices, causing AIDS and hanging around street corners wearing a hoodie.
Shit, must stop reading the Daily Mail.

Rantor
13th September 2007, 14:20
putting up house prices, causing AIDS and hanging around street corners wearing a hoodie.
Shit, must stop reading the Daily Mail.

Off Topic - Nice Avatar DG

GreenerGrass
13th September 2007, 19:18
Yes: http://news.independent.co.uk/europe/article2938940.ece

Interesting article that

"At the end of 2006, 5,888 people were interned in Swiss prisons. 31 per cent were Swiss citizens – 69 per cent were foreigners or asylum-seekers".

So in order to reject claims of nazism should they abandon the democratic wishes of the majority of citizens and surrender to anti-democratic forces of liberal socialist multiculturalism and Islamism?

I thought democracy was about letting the majority of people decide themselves what they want for their country?

Obviously I'm playing devil's advocate here, I was arrested myself as a foreign tram fare evader in Zurich. I could have been shot.

Joe Black
13th September 2007, 19:24
Yes: http://news.independent.co.uk/europe/article2938940.eceI'd second that...if only they'd let me vote. :(

NotAllThere
14th September 2007, 05:06
Swiss citizens are less likely to be prosecuted for committing the same offence as a non-Swiss.

A significant number of the "asylum seekers" have committed no crime, other than failing their asylum application. A failed asylum seeker is told they have to leave. But as they have no money, they can't. So they get jailed.

While in jail, they get fed on Muesli and Fondue. This must surely constitute cruel and unusual punishment. :grin

There are 1,500,000 non-Swiss residents in Switzerland, who have no say in how the country runs. The Swiss living in Switzerland number about 6,000,000. In some cantons the proportion of non-Swiss to Swiss is much higher. Some Swiss recognise that this is a problem.

The funny thing is that you hardly ever see Swiss people in the workplace. The Swiss need foreign labour at all levels to run their country. In the pharmaceutical industry, the Swiss own the companies, the Germans manage them, and the Brits do the specialist work. The Italians do the admin.

Troll
14th September 2007, 06:37
They appear before a citizenship committee and answer questions about their desire to be Swiss. After that, they must often be approved by the entire voting community, in a secret ballot, or a show of hands. . true democracy in action..

GreenerGrass
14th September 2007, 07:02
The Italians do the admin.

And run the sandwich shops (thankfully).



The Swiss need foreign labour at all levels to run their country


I think they realise this, but they just don't want all the criminals, scroungers, and religious fanatics that go with uncontrolled immigration.
It sounds like the countries that have the nerve to critisize the Swiss are just bitter and jealous.

NotAllThere
14th September 2007, 07:03
They have to be fluent in at least one national language. German, French, Italian or Reto-Romansch.

Only three people speak Reto-Romansch. And the majority of alledgedly German speaking Swiss don't speak German; rather their dialect.

Troll
14th September 2007, 07:08
It sounds like the countries that have the nerve to criticise the Swiss are just bitter and jealous.:yay:

GreenerGrass
14th September 2007, 07:14
And I heard you have to be able to tell a hilarious joke about Austrians (like our Irish jokes) to be granted citizenship.