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View Full Version : Petrol to break the £1/litre mark soon



King Cnvt
26th September 2007, 12:51
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-23412977-details/Warning+of+biggest+petrol+duty+rise+for+eight+year s/article.do

Motorists face a triple whammy of tax rises on petrol that will take unleaded to more than £1 a litre.

Three scheduled increases, totalling 7p a litre, will begin with a 2.35p per litre increase in duty from October 1.

The AA and the Petrol Retailers' Association urged the Government to defer the rises indefinitely after the AA published its latest fuel price report yesterday.

Combined with the 1.47p duty hike from December 2006, the October rise alone will mean a typical two-car family will be more than £100 a year worse off, said the AA.

But there is even more pain to come. As oil prices rise to record levels, the Government is also set to impose 2.35p in extra duty next April and 2.11p in April 2009.

The Treasury already takes about 70p in every pound as tax on petrol, which costs an average of 95.2p per litre.

Paul Watters of the AA said: "This is the highest rise in fuel duty since March 2000.


Still, as long as house prices go up, who cares.

Murder1
26th September 2007, 12:54
The Treasury already takes about 70p in every pound as tax on petrol, which costs an average of 95.2p per litre.


:tantrum:

Churchill
26th September 2007, 12:56
It's only fair...

KathyWoolfe
26th September 2007, 13:05
The Treasury already takes about 70p in every pound as tax on petrol, which costs an average of 95.2p per litre.


About time we started protesting again. :tantrum:

That truckers protest in 2000 hasn't seemed to help reduce the tax levied on fuel much - and the government / local councils are trying to think up even more ways of getting monet out of the motorist. The Nottingham council is proposing to levy tax on every company parking space in the city centre. :ohwell

Bagpuss
26th September 2007, 13:09
The Nottingham council is proposing to levy tax on every company parking space in the city centre. :ohwell

I thought that was already done?

Muttley08
26th September 2007, 13:10
I remember the fuel protests...tried to drive through Edinburgh at the time...

Really appreciated the way they made their point to the government by causing traffic chaos on a go-slow protest through the city centre...to pi$$ everyone else off who has nothing to do with the cost of petrol.

They weren't very pleased when I performed appropriate hand signals at them.

Fortunately at that point I was driving the other way

:smile

Bagpuss
26th September 2007, 13:12
They made the government listen for a short while. The problem isn't them it's the rest who take it on the chin and do nothing but moan. If this were france we'd be burning sheep.

Churchill
26th September 2007, 13:32
They made the government listen for a short while. The problem isn't them it's the rest who take it on the chin and do nothing but moan. If this were france we'd be burning sheep.

If this were NZ, we'd be shagging them.

Muttley08
26th September 2007, 13:34
If this were NZ, we'd be shagging them.

Or Wales...or do they not need an excuse?

Bagpuss
26th September 2007, 13:36
The protests happen there when you stop them

Chugnut
26th September 2007, 13:37
If this were france we'd be burning sheep.

Are they of a similar octane to unleaded? Would be good to know in case the pumps run dry.

Bagpuss
26th September 2007, 13:45
even during the fuel crisis people did not notice the nossle is on a hose long enough to reach the far side of most cars. You still had people waiting in massive queues for a pump on the filler side:freaky:

Muttley08
26th September 2007, 13:47
even during the fuel crisis people did not notice the nossle is on a hose long enough to reach the far side of most cars. You still had people waiting in massive queues for a pump on the filler side:freaky:

That amazes me, how many people won't reach round, but sit in a queue...

Jog On
26th September 2007, 13:52
FFS I'm going to start brewing my own biodiesel

NoddY
26th September 2007, 15:39
Part of the explanation of rising prices is it's not so much petrol is rising in value as the pound sterling decreasing in value - something akin to the US dollar. Ergo, selling your labour for pounds sterling (or US dollars) is becoming increasingly foolish.

Board Game Geek
26th September 2007, 23:08
That amazes me, how many people won't reach round, but sit in a queue...

I tried it once in my car.

I Yanked my hose all the way round the car, over the roof, down the other side, and I still couldn't reach the hole by 2 inches.

I had to mess around by backing up a bit, then going forward a bit more, so that the length of my hose would be a bit nearer to the hole.

I finally reached it (except I had to use my nozzle upside down and my hand ached all the time I was holding it). Has anyone ever worked out how to use the locking mechanism on the nozzle so it just gushes out without you having to squeeze your trigger ?


I then had some spillage when I pulled out, due to the upside-down angle plus I got a nice white shirt covered in muck from the black hose.

Seemed more hassle than it's worth.

More than happy to wait in a queue to avoid all that trouble again.

Besides, think of queuing as productive downtime. You can change the CD, fiddle with the dash (I found a new button last week that makes the headlights sort of go up and down), read the paper, chill out.)

If I've got to wait for the chap ahead of me to finish refueliing and then wander in the shop to get his lunch, paper and fags, then you can jolly well wait behind me as well. Neither of us are going anywhere are we ?

bobhope
27th September 2007, 06:35
maybe it will help break the addiction to sitting in traffic jams all day then?

VectraMan
27th September 2007, 07:40
even during the fuel crisis people did not notice the nossle is on a hose long enough to reach the far side of most cars. You still had people waiting in massive queues for a pump on the filler side:freaky:

Long may that continue. I have two japanese cars with the filler on the left.:D

I've paid more than £1 per litre lots of times. What's everybody complaining about?

Churchill
27th September 2007, 07:57
That amazes me, how many people won't reach round, but sit in a queue...

there's nothing like a good reach around...

TheFaQQer
27th September 2007, 08:33
I tried it once in my car.

I Yanked my hose all the way round the car, over the roof, down the other side, and I still couldn't reach the hole by 2 inches.

I had to mess around by backing up a bit, then going forward a bit more, so that the length of my hose would be a bit nearer to the hole.


Didn't realise that you were a woman!

King Cnvt
27th September 2007, 08:35
There's nothing worse than yanking your hose and realising it is too short to reach the hole, so you end up spurting it all over the place.

dang65
27th September 2007, 08:37
I think the government tax on fuel is a clever cushion they've set up for when oil prices really start rising seriously. With such a high rate of tax, they'll have the option to simply reduce the tax as crude prices rise, thus allowing pump prices to stay fairly level for a while. If crude prices suddenly shot up with no slack like that then there would be big time panic buying, not just of fuel but everything else too.

I might be giving the government too many cleverness points here though.

BoredBloke
27th September 2007, 08:41
"I think the government tax on fuel is a clever cushion they've set up for when oil prices really start rising seriously. With such a high rate of tax, they'll have the option to simply reduce the tax as crude prices rise, thus allowing pump prices to stay fairly level for a while. If crude prices suddenly shot up with no slack like that then there would be big time panic buying, not just of fuel but everything else too.

I might be giving the government too many cleverness points here though."

Yes you are. The tax levied is high because they know that we have to pay it. Simple as that. They can dress it up in whatever green issue they want, but the simple fact is, they pile the tax on petrol because without it our cars don't work. Imagine the public transport we would have in they ring fenced all petrol duties and spent it on public transport. They won't becuase it would be self defeating. Get people to stop using their cars and a revenue stream dries up.

dang65
27th September 2007, 08:54
The tax levied is high because they know that we have to pay it. Simple as that. Get people to stop using their cars and a revenue stream dries up.
Would there be an advantage to the country if the government greatly reduced the tax on fuel? Drivers would have more money, and I imagine their reaction to having more money would be to buy a nicer car, because that's most important to drivers. Or they'd have more to spend on a bigger mortgage, not to buy a bigger house but to pay more for the same size house - more spare cash = higher property prices.

And of course the government would have a hell of a lot less money if fuel tax were lowered. I know they spend most of it on housing illegal immigrants and paying benefits to Eastern Europeans, but some of it goes to schools and hospitals and transport and roads and pensions and so on.

If extra cash has to be raised from somewhere then it kind of makes sense to get it from people who can obviously spare it, which is private car drivers.

King Cnvt
27th September 2007, 09:10
How about taxing the 10,000's of Non Domiciled millionaire/billionaires living tax-free in the tax haven of the UK, rather than the already screwed working man/woman who happens to need a car to make a journey practical?

Just a thought.

"Campaigners have been demanding the removal of rules that allow private equity firms to get tax relief on the debt they use to buy companies, as well as laws introduced by Mr Brown which allow private equity partners to pay as little as 5% tax on the bulk of their income.

"It has been reported that 112,000 individuals indicated "non-dom" status in their self-assessment returns in the tax year to April 2005 - a 74% increase on 2002's figures. Accountants have estimated that if 20% of private equity businessmen left the country if the practice ended, Britain would still be better off by £4.3bn, equivalent to more than a penny off income tax."

And yet the HMRC are more concerned with IR35 than chasing these 112,000 people living tax free in the UK.

chicane
27th September 2007, 09:43
Would there be an advantage to the country if the government greatly reduced the tax on fuel? Drivers would have more money...

Or would the oil companies simply push up the price of petrol in the UK to compensate? It's not like you're going to drive over to France to fill up.

VectraMan
27th September 2007, 09:53
Would there be an advantage to the country if the government greatly reduced the tax on fuel? Drivers would have more money, and I imagine their reaction to having more money would be to buy a nicer car, because that's most important to drivers. Or they'd have more to spend on a bigger mortgage, not to buy a bigger house but to pay more for the same size house - more spare cash = higher property prices.

Regrettably, I agree with Mr Dang.

However you could say that if tax on fuel is being used as a way to keep us all poorer and keep the economy in check, then that's the same as interest rates. From my point of view I'd much rather see higher interest rates and cheaper fuel.

KathyWoolfe
27th September 2007, 10:36
Part of the explanation of rising prices is it's not so much petrol is rising in value as the pound sterling decreasing in value - something akin to the US dollar. Ergo, selling your labour for pounds sterling (or US dollars) is becoming increasingly foolish.

Sterling is much stronger than the dollar - you can get about 2 dollars for every £. So apart from the taxation there is no reason why petrol should be more expensive here.:mad
Even in Australia - which to my knowledge has to import all its oil - the petrol there is about 95c per litre - on the surface, a similar price to here except for the fact that yoiu get 2 A$ to the £ making their price half of ours :tantrum:

KathyWoolfe
27th September 2007, 10:38
I might be giving the government too many cleverness points here though.

I think so!

_V_
27th September 2007, 10:42
I believe our fuel is in the top 5 most expensive places to buy fuel in the world. This is purely down to us have the most heavily taxed fuel in the world.