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TimberWolf
23rd April 2008, 10:10
I've just paid £42.00 for 7 a minute check-up and polish, or £6/minute. Good money if you can get it.

Okay some of that cost covers overheads such as the ugly receptionists talking about jackets and whatnot, but it still seems excessive. Doctors and dentists seem to have done well under labour.

Is this a typical cost?

KathyWoolfe
23rd April 2008, 10:14
I've just paid £42.00 for 7 a minute check-up and polish, or £6/minute. Good money if you can get it.

Okay some of that cost covers overheads such as the ugly receptionists talking about jackets and whatnot, but it still seems excessive. Doctors and dentists seem to have done well under labour.

Is this a typical cost?

Yes, it is a typical cost. :mad
I once got charged £200 for root canal work - and that was the NHS cost, I queried it and was told that non-NHS charges for that kind of work was £600+ :eek:

Dentists are the only medical practitioners who charge for NHS treatment as far as I know :eek:

cailin maith
23rd April 2008, 10:16
I've just paid £42.00 for 7 a minute check-up and polish, or £6/minute. Good money if you can get it.

Okay some of that cost covers overheads such as the ugly receptionists talking about jackets and whatnot, but it still seems excessive. Doctors and dentists seem to have done well under labour.

Is this a typical cost?

Yes - after my trip yesterday I am £50 less off and after seeing the hygenist, I will be £120 quid less off.... grim :(

rootsnall
23rd April 2008, 10:18
Get yourself an NHS dentist ! Mine went private but finding a new one wasn't that hard. If your teeth are OK I wouldn't even bother going for a check up, wait until it hurts.

oracleslave
23rd April 2008, 10:19
I paid something similar for a while to see a chiropracter. Sometimes I was in and out in 5 min and £40 poorer for the 'pleasure'

Cue comment re the innuendo

cailin maith
23rd April 2008, 10:20
Get yourself an NHS dentist ! Mine went private but finding a new one wasn't that hard. If your teeth are OK I wouldn't even bother going for a check up, wait until it hurts.

Can't find one at all in my area who is taking on NHS patients.... :(

PAH
23rd April 2008, 10:21
I have dental insurance but still have to pay hundreds for treatment. It's getting like solicitors and other professions where there is a monopoly going on causing prices to stay high.

Just try finding a NHS dentist. They're the same ones doing private work so they're obviously going to go for whatever pays the most.

My only comfort is knowing I'm only paying a pittance in national insurance.

Xenophon
23rd April 2008, 10:22
I paid something similar for a while to see a chiropracter. Sometimes I was in and out in 5 min and £40 poorer for the 'pleasure'

Cue comment re the innuendo

As requested:

Oo-er, you said 'pleasure'. *snigger* *giggle*

rootsnall
23rd April 2008, 10:24
Can't find one at all in my area who is taking on NHS patients.... :(

Try harder !? I know when mine went private it meant there was then a pot of money available for local NHS dentistry and in theory a new one will open or an exisiting one expand to pick up the slack. Look around in the rougher areas in your neck of the woods, at my new one the dentists are polish, chinese etc but seem good.

KathyWoolfe
23rd April 2008, 10:26
Can't find one at all in my area who is taking on NHS patients.... :(


Up here in the land of the Scot it is virtually impossible to find an NHS dentist. I travel 80 miles from Edinburgh to Ayr for my dental treatment because of this as once you HAVE found one it's best to stay with them wherever you live....

PAH
23rd April 2008, 10:28
Try harder !?

:rolleyes:

It's easy getting a list off the NHS website. Just try phoning them all. No chance. I did this recently when moving to the area and was forced to go private.

Maybe this explains some of the problem.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7189448.stm

BoredBloke
23rd April 2008, 10:30
About 4 months ago I called my PCT for names of dentists taking on. They gave me a number and now I have a NHS dentist.

cailin maith
23rd April 2008, 10:33
Try harder !? I know when mine went private it meant there was then a pot of money available for local NHS dentistry and in theory a new one will open or an exisiting one expand to pick up the slack. Look around in the rougher areas in your neck of the woods, at my new one the dentists are polish, chinese etc but seem good.

Sod off - I did try hard... and got no place...


About 4 months ago I called my PCT for names of dentists taking on. They gave me a number and now I have a NHS dentist.

Well perhaps your PCT is better off than mine, I don't know but out of all the ones I rang - and there must have been about 40, none were taking on new patients.

I'm hardly going to pay over the odds am I just because I can't be bothered.

Honest to God, you lot are so ******** argumentative.

Pondlife
23rd April 2008, 10:42
I hadn't been for years but went the other week.

£35 for initial consultation and £28 for the old scale and polish.

Still no fillings :yay:


Edit: Took my mobile so it's all billable time. Think I might be up on the deal TBH.

darmstadt
23rd April 2008, 10:45
Been 12 times so far this year but Monday was the last for a while, €3000 spent so far. Got to go for a proper cleaning session later this year which is private here in Germany and will cost me €140.

rootsnall
23rd April 2008, 10:51
Sod off - I did try hard... and got no place....

I beg your pardon. Just trying to help motivate you !

PAH
23rd April 2008, 10:53
About 4 months ago I called my PCT for names of dentists taking on. They gave me a number and now I have a NHS dentist.


Is it a fairly new practice, so were/are building up a client base?

I see dentists similar to driving instructors. They only have so many hours a week they can earn money so are naturally going to go for the type of work that pays more money.

So I wouldn't be suprised if some do have vacancies but are keeping whatever free slots they have open for when the person rings back later and accepts private treatment.

With the number of new laws the govermin likes to bring out, it's only a matter of time before they force dentists to accept a certain proportion of NHS patients, if they do want to try and sort it out. As it is they seem happy with the two tier system they bang on about wanting to avoid.

Xenophon
23rd April 2008, 10:55
I beg your pardon. Just trying to help motivate you !

You did say 'try harder'. That is about as motivating as poking someone up the bum with a snooker cue.

NotAllThere
23rd April 2008, 10:58
Dental treatment in Switzerland is incredibly expensive, as is dental insurance. My daughters 3 year braces treatment has cost the best part of £5000. When we had to take her for emergency treatment when in the UK, the UK dentist was not impressed with the quality of the work - "The kind of thing that was taught 20 years ago".

So, Swiss dentistry - expensive and out of date.

When we visited Hungary a few years ago, we had some emergency out of hours treatment for our other daughter. 10'000 Forint it cost. That's about £30. And it was all the very latest equipment.

It's not unknown that when root canal surgery or something similarly expensive is required, to fly to Budapest, have the treatment, stay in a nice hotel etc. It's cheaper.

Cyberman
23rd April 2008, 11:01
Go abroad and have dental work done far cheaper !!

If you have toothache, try taking antibiotics. I did that two years ago after a month of pain and have been fine ever since, and have had no work done even though the dentist wanted to give me root canal fillings for 800 quid. :freaky:

PAH
23rd April 2008, 11:01
When we visited Hungary a few years ago, we had some emergency out of hours treatment for our other daughter. 10'000 Forint it cost. That's about £30. And it was all the very latest equipment.

It's not unknown that when root canal surgery or something similarly expensive is required, to fly to Budapest, have the treatment, stay in a nice hotel etc. It's cheaper.


I'm tempted to try that for some implants I'll probably be needing later in the year. It's the thought of aftercare and if something goes wrong that puts me off. Something I need to research a bit more before deciding.

NotAllThere
23rd April 2008, 11:08
My wife had her eye laser surgery in Amsterdam. Both eyes, femtolasik, total cost €3500. And an excellent job. Here it would have cost twice that at least. Aftercare would only have been problematic if something had gone drastically wrong. But having saved a few thousand, you've got those spare to pay for remedy - flying back, or having treatment nearer home.

TimberWolf
23rd April 2008, 11:15
My wife had her eye laser surgery in Amsterdam. Both eyes, femtolasik, total cost €3500. And an excellent job. Here it would have cost twice that at least. Aftercare would only have been problematic if something had gone drastically wrong. But having saved a few thousand, you've got those spare to pay for remedy - flying back, or having treatment nearer home.

£2,802 doesn't seem particularly cheap though? For those that don't know, the femtosecond (AKA Intralase, all-laser LASIK) laser is used to create a thin flap in the cornea, as apposed to using a sugical blade, before LASIK treatment is applied on the exposed cornea.

cailin maith
23rd April 2008, 11:19
£2,802 doesn't seem particularly cheap though? For those that don't know, the femtosecond (AKA Intralase, all-laser LASIK) laser is used to create a thin flap in the cornea, as apposed to using a sugical blade, before LASIK treatment is applied on the exposed cornea.

:sick I'm going to carry on wearing specs......

Xenophon
23rd April 2008, 11:21
£2,802 doesn't seem particularly cheap though? For those that don't know, the femtosecond (AKA Intralase, all-laser LASIK) laser is used to create a thin flap in the cornea, as apposed to using a sugical blade, before LASIK treatment is applied on the exposed cornea.

Eewwwww. I try to avoid anything that involves flaps.

Well, almost anything. Thin flaps are nicer...

IGMC

Moscow Mule
23rd April 2008, 11:22
IGMC

Probably best.

TimberWolf
23rd April 2008, 11:26
:sick I'm going to carry on wearing specs......

LASIK is one of the two main techniques used for corneal reshaping. The surface techniques (now making a comeback) include PRK, LASEK, epi-LASIK, where just the surface of the cornea is zapped, while with LASIK reshaping is done underneath a very thin flap. Sometimes staying with specs is indeed the best option, especially if you are only mildly shortsighted since that will come in handy after the age of 40.

Xenophon
23rd April 2008, 11:27
LASIK is one of the two main techniques used for corneal reshaping. The surface techniques (now making a comeback) include PRK, LASEK, epi-LASIK, where just the surface of the cornea is zapped, while with LASIK reshaping is done underneath a very thin flap. Sometimes staying with specs is indeed the best option, especially if you are only midly shortsighted since that will come in handy after the age of 40.

Oooooh.

cailin maith
23rd April 2008, 11:29
LASIK is one of the two main techniques used for corneal reshaping. The surface techniques (now making a comeback) include PRK, LASEK, epi-LASIK, where just the surface of the cornea is zapped, while with LASIK reshaping is done underneath a very thin flap. Sometimes staying with specs is indeed the best option, especially if you are only mildly shortsighted since that will come in handy after the age of 40.

Nah - blind as a bat without them but I am too scared to go down the Laser surgery route, my gut feeling is that it hasn't been around long enough to know if it really works, but thats just me - I am sure for some people it's the best thing they ever did.

TimberWolf
23rd April 2008, 11:29
Oooooh.

Around 100 microns (0.1mm).

cailin maith
23rd April 2008, 11:30
Oooooh.

As SA pointed out so well yesterday (or whenever) - Perv :laugh

sasguru
23rd April 2008, 11:30
:sick I'm going to carry on wearing specs......

Ooooh I love a woman with glasses. That school mistress look. Are you strict?

Xenophon
23rd April 2008, 11:31
Around 100 microns (0.1mm).

TimberWolf is awarded +5 Xeno Geek Points.

cailin maith
23rd April 2008, 11:32
Ooooh I love a woman with glasses. That school mistress look. Are you strict?

I have a spank paddle in TPD if you'd like to try it out.... there are a few boyos on here with spanked asses.... :spank:

Xenophon
23rd April 2008, 11:37
I have a spank paddle in TPD if you'd like to try it out.... there are a few boyos on here with spanked asses.... :spank:

Done that.

TimberWolf
23rd April 2008, 11:37
You are sooooo right...

The interesting thing about presbyopia is that it starts aged 10! It gets rapidly noticeable in the 40's though.

PAH
23rd April 2008, 11:43
Nah - blind as a bat without them but I am too scared to go down the Laser surgery route, my gut feeling is that it hasn't been around long enough to know if it really works, but thats just me - I am sure for some people it's the best thing they ever did.


I knew someone that had laser eye surgery in its early days and now has problems with her vision in the dark.

Maybe she was just blagging though, so I had to drive everywhere at night and she could get pissed.

cailin maith
23rd April 2008, 11:46
Done that.

Yes - there is a "Xen's ass shape" formed in that paddle all right... :smile

TimberWolf
23rd April 2008, 11:50
I knew someone that had laser eye surgery in its early days and now has problems with her vision in the dark.

Maybe she was just blagging though, so I had to drive everywhere at night and she could get pissed.

That can happen, and was worse in its early days. One of the problems that can happen is that the pupil dilates beyond the laser ablation zone, at night, so you get shortsighted, or longsighted, depending on what you were, and might see halos/starbursts too.

Xenophon
23rd April 2008, 11:52
Yes - there is a "Xen's ass shape" formed in that paddle all right... :smile

Nice.

Like two good sized apples in a hanky.

Lucy
23rd April 2008, 11:55
Nice.

Like two half-eaten apples in a hanky.

HTH:moon:

cailin maith
23rd April 2008, 11:56
Nice.

Like two good sized apples in a hanky.

:rollin: :rollin: Exactly like that!

PAH
23rd April 2008, 12:00
That can happen, and was worse in its early days. One of the problems that can happen is that the pupil dilates beyond the laser ablation zone, at night, so you get shortsighted, or longsighted, depending on what you were, and might see halos/starbursts too.


Yeah she often saw stars when she was with me. :wink

Not so much the halo.

NotAllThere
23rd April 2008, 12:02
The cost of laser surgery and its effectiveness depends on the degree of short-sightedness (for example, it's completely useless for politicians). My wife still has some vision problems - highlighting and starbursts at night, but not enough to stop her driving me around :yay: - but the correction has remained 20:20. The surgeon warned that it could settle down to -3. This particularly surgeon specialised in very thin flaps, which, while needing more care in the early days, leads, he says, to better long term results. The guy was quite clearly mad; I'm sure I heard him say "And they call me crazy - bwhahahahahahah".

And it was about £2500 at the exchange rates then. And there was no-one in the UK who'd do it for close to that for her prescription.

Personally, though, I ain't lettin' no darn laser near my eyes.

hyperD
23rd April 2008, 12:05
It's not unknown that when root canal surgery or something similarly expensive is required, to fly to Budapest, have the treatment, stay in a nice hotel etc. It's cheaper.

I'd agree with this BUT beware: make sure you are comparing like with like - my wife had implants and some high quality fake gnashers put in (private UK in the end) but some of the Hungarian dentists were not using the same high quality materials.

TimberWolf
23rd April 2008, 12:05
The cost of laser surgery and its effectiveness depends on the degree of short-sightedness (for example, it's completely useless for politicians). My wife still has some vision problems - highlighting and starbursts at night, but not enough to stop her driving me around :yay: - but the correction has remained 20:20. The surgeon warned that it could settle down to -3. This particularly surgeon specialised in very thin flaps, which, while needing more care in the early days, leads, he says, to better long term results. The guy was quite clearly mad; I'm sure I heard him say "And they call me crazy - bwhahahahahahah".

And it was about £2500 at the exchange rates then. And there was no-one in the UK who'd do it for close to that for her prescription.

Personally, though, I ain't lettin' no darn laser near my eyes.

What was her prescription?

Xenophon
23rd April 2008, 12:12
HTH:moon:
Fail



:rollin: :rollin: Exactly like that!
Win

NotAllThere
23rd April 2008, 12:17
What was her prescription?

-9.5 in one eye, -8 in the other.

( I think that's the right sign for myopia )

TimberWolf
23rd April 2008, 12:27
-9.5 in one eye, -8 in the other.

( I think that's the right sign for myopia )

Yep, -ve means a negative curvature (in the correcting lens), making it dispersive or less powerful. A positive lens (like a magnifying glass or the lens of the eye) is positive. Shortsighted people have a visual system that is too powerful, focussing rays in front of the retina, and a negaitive lens disperses these rays, increasing the focal length.

-9 is pretty shortsighted, and yeah you really need to go to the best with prescriptions like that. Regression is usually greatest in the first weeks and usually settles after 6 months or so, but any small amount of shortsightedness she might be left with can be useful. The thing to avoid is being made long-sightedness IMO, since this can be masked before the age of 45 'cos the lens of the eye will work like buggary to correct it while the patient thinks he/she has super vision.

oracleslave
23rd April 2008, 12:29
-9.5 in one eye, -8 in the other.

( I think that's the right sign for myopia )

:eek: I am -6 in the one eye and thought that was bad!

TimberWolf
23rd April 2008, 12:50
:eek: I am -6 in the one eye and thought that was bad!

I was around -7 in both eyes before LASIK, and was corrected to around -1, -1.75 ealier this year, which is midly shortsighted. I don't have a problem with reading close up with glasses yet, but this small amount of shortightness will mean I will not need to grope for glasses for close work when I am in my 40's and beyond. Unfortunately most people think 20/20 vision is perfect.

-6 is short for -6 diopters; this is the reciprocal of the focal length (of the corrective lens) in metres, meaning your optical system is at infinity at 17 cm from the eye. Before the age of 40 your lens can bring that focal point somewhat closer yet. Or in other words it's not so much that you have bad eyeisght, but have really good eyesight up close. Typically people end up needing +2D lenses or so as they age, though this would be more for longsighted people. Short sighted people can just take off their glasses for close work.

NotAllThere
23rd April 2008, 14:18
:eek: I am -6 in the one eye and thought that was bad!

Our neighbour is something insane - over -20 in one eye.

cailin maith
23rd April 2008, 14:20
:eek: I am -6 in the one eye and thought that was bad!

Me too, in my left eye. Very inconvenient :rolleyes:

oracleslave
23rd April 2008, 14:26
Our neighbour is something insane - over -20 in one eye.

:spel blind

expat
23rd April 2008, 14:46
Can't find one at all in my area who is taking on NHS patients.... :(I found a dentist who takes on NHS patients. Trouble is, she won't do all the levels of treatment on the NHS:

£15.90 - This charge includes an examination, diagnosis and preventive care. If necessary, this includes X-rays, scale and polish, and planning for further treatment. Urgent and out-of-hours care also costs £15.90.
£43.60 - This charge includes all necessary treatment covered by the £15.90 charge PLUS additional treatment such as fillings, root canal treatment or extractions.
£194 -This charge includes all necessary treatment covered by the £15.90 and £43.60 charges PLUS more complex procedures such as crowns, dentures or bridges.

She will only do £15.90 treatment on the NHS: i.e. get them in on the NHS but charge them private for the treatment. I also got charged £37 for a clean, when she did the NHS examination, and recommended a clean without specifying that her practice did not offer than on the NHS. I paid up, then googled a bit, then queried the charge. She refunded it - and dropped me from the practice.

Well, I wasn't about to go back anyway, but it was a perfect finish: argue your charges down to NHS level, and you are not wanted.

I'm back on contract in NL and just get it done here.

TimberWolf
23rd April 2008, 14:52
Even then it'll get you in the end... I'm almost at the stage of needing reading glasses at 54... one eye is ok, but the other one (not so short sighted) will no longer focus comfortably for reading...

It's a bit offputting because I now have a very narrow range where both eyes are properly focussed... and it's getting further & further away...

Yep, it's the ability to accomodate that diminishes and you end up with what the optoms called your cycloplegic refraction, that is the true refractive state of your eye. At an earlier age your eye can accommodate, but only in the positive direction (to make things closer come into focus). Aged 65 or so we only have about 1D of accomodation or less to play with, so that's the range you notice getting less. What's your prescription, presumably it's less than -2D ? A lot of people choose monovision and get used to reading with one eye but need glasses for best vision. I did something unusual and opted to have both eyes left slightly miopic, rather than loose the stereopsis.

KathyWoolfe
23rd April 2008, 15:07
I'm lucky in that I only need glasses for reading (both books and computer screen) and I get those non-prescription glasses from chemists +2 diopters I think. :nerd
I put this healthiness down to the fact that I used to read a book whilst simultaneously keeping watching the TV. :cool:

And how did we end up talking about eye problems on a thread about dentists :confused: