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DimPrawn
28th April 2008, 13:38
One acre is about 64 metres x 64 metres so not that big really? I like it when a house is described to be on a 0.1 acre plot. Feck all innit?

If land is described as a paddock, what does this mean in legal terms? If a house comes with a paddock, can this be used at a garden, can it be landscaped and plated with trees? What are the rules on paddocks? Can I have a lake put on it?

sasguru
28th April 2008, 13:39
One acre is about 64 metres x 64 metres so not that big really? I like it when a house is described to be on a 0.1 acre plot. flip all innit?

If land is described as a paddock, what does this mean in legal terms? If a house comes with a paddock, can this be used at a garden, can it be landscaped and plated with trees? What are the rules on paddocks? Can I have a lake put on it?

One thing you can't do is make your Paddock the mayor of London.

IGMC

EternalOptimist
28th April 2008, 13:43
One thing you can't do is make your Paddock the mayor of London.

IGMC

damn that guru. pipped me again

DimPrawn
28th April 2008, 14:31
No one here got any clue about land then?

Xenophon
28th April 2008, 14:32
No one here got any clue about land then?

No. Next.

sasguru
28th April 2008, 14:34
No one here got any clue about land then?


Isn't that what BTLs are built on?

DimPrawn
28th April 2008, 14:35
Isn't that what BTLs are built on?

Land to your City types is somewhere big enough to park your Smart four-two on, I know.

sasguru
28th April 2008, 14:36
Land to your City types is somewhere big enough to park your Smart four-two on, I know.

:spel Aygo

TimberWolf
28th April 2008, 14:40
No one here got any clue about land then?

England has the lowest LPC (land per capita) in Europe?

sasguru
28th April 2008, 14:41
England has the lowest LPC (land per capita) in Europe?

If you're talking about pop. density then it's Holland shirley?

milanbenes
28th April 2008, 14:41
Dim,

first things first,

an acre is about 5000m2 and not 64m by 64m

secondly, as far as I understand, a paddock is another term for a field, but paddock is how they describe a field in the pony club vocabulary

as far as I understand, you can do whatever you wish with your paddock,
as long as you do not build on it or dig too big a lake that the neighbours think you are taking the p and trying to open a quarry through the back door

hth

now, back to your link detached mock tudor end of terrace suburbian utopia

Milan.

TimberWolf
28th April 2008, 14:42
If you're talking about pop. density then it's Holland shirley?

I thought we overtook them? Dunno why I thought that though...

sasguru
28th April 2008, 14:44
Dim,

first things first,

an acre is about 5000m2 and not 64m by 64m

.


Back to maths remedial class, country bumpkin :laugh

DimPrawn
28th April 2008, 14:46
Dim,

first things first,

an acre is about 5000m2 and not 64m by 64m

secondly, as far as I understand, a paddock is another term for a field, but paddock is how they describe a field in the pony club vocabulary

as far as I understand, you can do whatever you wish with your paddock,
as long as you do not build on it or dig too big a lake that the neighbours think you are taking the p and trying to open a quarry through the back door

hth

now, back to your link detached mock tudor end of terrace suburbian utopia

Milan.


Since you don't even know how big and acre is, or how to do a sqrt, I'll skip the rest of your advice.

HTH

Bear
28th April 2008, 14:46
One acre is about 64 metres x 64 metres so not that big really? I like it when a house is described to be on a 0.1 acre plot. flip all innit?

If land is described as a paddock, what does this mean in legal terms? If a house comes with a paddock, can this be used at a garden, can it be landscaped and plated with trees? What are the rules on paddocks? Can I have a lake put on it?

I believe that if you landscape, plant it etc then 'technically' you should apply for change of use. I do know that you can't just dig a lake without planning permission.

However, you are allowed to dig a pond which may just get a bit bigger each year. Sorry - can't remember the size at which a pond turns into a lake.

TimberWolf
28th April 2008, 14:51
I thought we overtook them? Dunno why I thought that though...

Here you go:

It's official: England is the most crowded country in Europe

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=505585&in_page_id=1770

(The rest of the article appears not to support that headline though)

milanbenes
28th April 2008, 14:52
SAD,

ok give you that one

Milan.

Marina
28th April 2008, 14:58
I thought we overtook them? Dunno why I thought that though...

For a start, they're literally pinching our land - All the land lost to coastal erosion in East Anglia gradually washes across the North Sea and ends up expanding Holland!

Also, Eastern England is sinking and the sneaky Dutch are probably on the other end of the seesaw rising!

In a couple a couple of million years, with or without global warming, England will be little more than a line of small islands like the Hebrides.

Churchill
28th April 2008, 15:04
In a couple a couple of million years, with or without global warming, England will be little more than a line of small islands like the Hebrides.

We're half-way there already!!! We're full of Scots twats!

HYpno27
28th April 2008, 15:07
Some of us aren't all that urban these days.

A paddock is primarily for grazing horses (or cattle) on. As distinct from arable which you can grow crops on, or erect (fnah) a house or permanent structure on beyond a temporary field shelter.

You might need planning permission for the lake, and weirdly even for the trees, but more than likely able to get away with it unless you are looking to turn a profit from it

It will depend on the current use

Bagpuss
28th April 2008, 15:11
on the other hand
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=510161&in_page_id=1770

Chugnut
28th April 2008, 15:25
One acre is about 64 metres x 64 metres so not that big really? I like it when a house is described to be on a 0.1 acre plot. flip all innit?

If land is described as a paddock, what does this mean in legal terms? If a house comes with a paddock, can this be used at a garden, can it be landscaped and plated with trees? What are the rules on paddocks? Can I have a lake put on it?

Our neighbour bought a strip of agricultural land and applied for change of use to residential / garden. They were told to get rooted. They are now using it as a paddock, so I guess it's still classified as agricultural.

We did the same, bought a strip of land and have been advised that we wouldn't get change of use to residential so don't even bother applying. We weren't fussed; liked the idea of an orchard anyway.

We made the mistake of putting a garden table and chairs on it shortly after making a hole in the hedge to access the strip from our garden. It was only temporary and I hadn't got around to moving them back to the garden. Within 2 weeks, we had a visit from a council bod saying they'd been a complaint about the table and chairs. Council bod thought it was a bit petty that the complaint had been made so soon but basically we had to stop treating the land as garden (i.e. putting a table and chairs on it).

Basically Dim, if you treat the paddock as garden, expect a visit. If you build on (unless agricultural building I think) expect a kicking. If you want to build a lake on it, I'm not sure, but probably not, planning permission needed for any spoil removal from site though. Expect limitless levels of petty beaurocracy at all times.

Alternatively, plant a hedge. Do what you want and hope the council don't have helicopters.

HTH

DaveB
28th April 2008, 15:54
A paddock is usually a fenced area adjacent of very near to stables and primarily used for grazing horses. Usually only used as temporary grazing since a paddock is usually deemed to be too small to use for regular grazing.

As a rule of thumb allow 1.2 acres ( 0.5 Hectare ) per horse on good quality grazing. The worse the grazing the more acreage needed per horse. Most land used for grazing horses or ponies can only manage half this density, ie 2.4 acre per horse.

Anything over an acre normally qualifies as a field.

Marina
28th April 2008, 16:26
You may be able to earn a bit grazing other peoples' horses. But be careful of poisonous plants (http://ohioline.osu.edu/b762/b762_24.html) if you don't want the RSPCA, Ministry of Agriculture, and the animals' owners, and God knows who else on your case (literally).

DimPrawn
28th April 2008, 17:29
You may be able to earn a bit grazing other peoples' horses. But be careful of poisonous plants (http://ohioline.osu.edu/b762/b762_24.html) if you don't want the RSPCA, Ministry of Agriculture, and the animals' owners, and God knows who else on your case (literally).

Thanks Marina. If I ever move to Ohio and buy a horse, I'll bare this in mind.

:rolleyes:

ASB
28th April 2008, 17:57
Our neighbour bought a strip of agricultural land and applied for change of use to residential / garden. They were told to get rooted. They are now using it as a paddock, so I guess it's still classified as agricultural.

<Pedant> Though they are almost certainly ok there are restrictions on equine use of agricultural land. Major ones are related to ESA tier 1 and tier 2. These are probably pretty much all expired with the movement to the single payment scheme but there are some still around. If they are covered by these then the horses cannot be the prime users. If they incidental to other grazing OK otherwise it's a breach of the ESA agreement and this, as I found out, can get fairly expensive.

ASB
28th April 2008, 18:04
As a rule of thumb allow 1.2 acres ( 0.5 Hectare ) per horse on good quality grazing. The worse the grazing the more acreage needed per horse. Most land used for grazing horses or ponies can only manage half this density, ie 2.4 acre per horse.

YMMV but that seems a bit high for most of the year. We keep 4 in about 4 acres over winter and they still get a bit fat. Spring/Summrer/Autumn they are in about 1.5 acres together and we generally still have to strip graze.