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View Full Version : When to start selling yourself?



glif
9th May 2008, 11:10
Ok so I know that it may not be the best time to contract however I have taken the plunge and don't want to look back. My question to you people is when is the best time to start speaking to agencies and getting the CV out?

Most contracts are wanted ASAP but as I am leaving in July it may not be best to start now.

Unix SA

MarillionFan
9th May 2008, 13:18
Well it depends if you've sunk that low that you feel you have to sell your body to seedy men for a fiver a gobble.

Milan has done well with his plan B, but it's not for everyone!:ohwell

shelby68
9th May 2008, 13:20
Well it depends if you've sunk that low that you feel you have to sell your body to seedy men for a fiver a gobble.

Milan has done well with his plan B, but it's not for everyone!:ohwell


You get FIVE QUID!!! I need a new agent I don't get anything like that much!

EternalOptimist
9th May 2008, 13:22
You get FIVE QUID!!! I need a new agent I don't get anything like that much!

Who's the current agent ? s****g uk ?

You know the old saying
'One swallow doesn't make a Spring'






igmc

:rolleyes:

shelby68
9th May 2008, 13:23
On a more serious note most of the jobs I've got have taken weeks to sort out but on the other hand I know of a lot of people who have an interview Friday and are sat at a desk in their new role at 9am Monday.

I don't think theres a hard and fast rule but personally I'd probably start looking a month before.

Jog On
9th May 2008, 13:23
Ok so I know that it may not be the best time to contract however I have taken the plunge and don't want to look back. My question to you people is when is the best time to start speaking to agencies and getting the CV out?

Most contracts are wanted ASAP but as I am leaving in July it may not be best to start now.

Unix SA

Usually with about 2 (3 at the most) weeks until you're available.

oracleslave
9th May 2008, 13:23
Well it depends if you've sunk that low that you feel you have to sell your body to seedy men for a fiver a gobble.

Milan has done well with his plan B, but it's not for everyone!:ohwell

:laugh

Lucy
9th May 2008, 13:29
Well it depends if you've sunk that low that you feel you have to sell your body to seedy men for a fiver a gobble.

Milan has done well with his plan B, but it's not for everyone!:ohwell

Glad to see MF showing the newb the ways of CUK.:rolleyes:

shelby68
9th May 2008, 13:30
Glad to see MF showing the newb the ways of CUK.:rolleyes:

Yea but who did he learn all these bad habits of eh???

DaveB
9th May 2008, 13:39
Start now, chances are you wont get anything immediately and interview practice is always usefull.

Talk to your current employers. If they know you are leaving see if you can negotiate an early get out or at least make them aware you are actively looking and may get an offer at short notice. Chances are they won't care either way anyway.

Tell every agent you talk to you are on two weeks notice and get yourself in front of the client. From there you can talk direct to them and sort out expectations on start dates. Most will take the best part of a month to get things organised anyway. Generally the only people who insist you have to be able to "start tommorow" are the agent's. If the client likes you then 9 times out of 10 they will wait a couple of weeks extra for you to start.

Dow Jones
9th May 2008, 15:11
Ditching a good job 'to embark on an unknown journey to riches' (otherwise known as contracting) can also result in a lot of heartache and crawling back to the permie hole. I have seen this happen a lot of times, but you won't get anyone 'bragging' about it. So long as you know there are 2 sides of the coin.

SueEllen
9th May 2008, 15:33
Ok so I know that it may not be the best time to contract however I have taken the plunge and don't want to look back. My question to you people is when is the best time to start speaking to agencies and getting the CV out?

A month before you want one but tell the agents your available in a week.



Most contracts are wanted ASAP but as I am leaving in July it may not be best to start now.


Agents say one thing clients say another.

I've had a contract where I started the next day. I've had a contract where it's taken them 7 weeks to sort things out as it was direct.

PRC1964
9th May 2008, 15:53
Most of my contracts have been start immediately type jobs.

The ones that took a couple of weeks to sort out turned out to be for clients who were slightly less incompetent than the start now ones.

NickFitz
9th May 2008, 21:46
I had a client who interviewed me on a Monday and wanted me to start the next day - I managed to get them to accept a Wednesday start as I wanted a day to sort out a hotel and tidy up loose ends at home.

When I arrived on the Wednesday morning they didn't actually have a desk or computer for me, and made me sit with a permy so I could "learn how the application worked" from him. It was his first job since leaving uni, he'd never done any web development until starting there a few weeks previously, and after the first hour I knew more about the application than he did.

In the end, it was two weeks before the desk finally turned up :rolleyes:

Still, it's all money in the bank :)

SueEllen
9th May 2008, 22:23
Most of my contracts have been start immediately type jobs.

The ones that took a couple of weeks to sort out turned out to be for clients who were slightly less incompetent than the start now ones.

My experience has been the opposite.

The ones who wanted me to start immediately where a f***ing mess. There as the ones who had a time delay where organised but thought they were disorganised - in other words I had a desk, chair and computer to work from.

SandyDown
9th May 2008, 23:02
I actually love them jobs when they want you to start yesterday... I once attended an interview, and the first and last question they asked is: when can you start :laugh .. said tomorrow and they took me in.... yes such clients are so unorganised, but I am getting paid for it, right?

thunderlizard
9th May 2008, 23:28
I don't know why it isn't like that more often. We're supposed to be skilled psople to come and do a task, not staff wanting to join a company. When we hired the builders to do the extension, I don't recall interviewing them for an hour on which brands of plaster they'd got experience with, or quizzing them on the relative drying times of matt versus gloss.

DiscoStu
10th May 2008, 13:21
I don't know why it isn't like that more often. We're supposed to be skilled psople to come and do a task, not staff wanting to join a company. When we hired the builders to do the extension, I don't recall interviewing them for an hour on which brands of plaster they'd got experience with, or quizzing them on the relative drying times of matt versus gloss.

Problem is there are probably more cowboy contractors that there are builders...