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The Lone Gunman
30th June 2008, 11:00
Apparently it is acceptable to write "**** off" as an answer to an exam question even though the press wont print it, nor will the BBC and you stand a chance of getting a ban on CUK if you circumvent the sweary filter.
http://uk.news.yahoo.com/rtrs/20080630/tuk-uk-britain-exam-fa6b408.html

expat
30th June 2008, 11:07
Apparently it is acceptable to write "**** off" as an answer to an exam question even though the press wont print it, nor will the BBC and you stand a chance of getting a ban on CUK if you circumvent the sweary filter.
http://uk.news.yahoo.com/rtrs/20080630/tuk-uk-britain-exam-fa6b408.htmlYou will find it in any decent (and I use the word advisedly) dictionary, including Wikipedia.

The press will print it. It was legally banned until I think the 60s or 70s. When the word became permissible in newspapers, the Guardian reported that as news on the front page, taking care to specify the word in question. Other newspapers bottled out.

And I'm foookin pisssed off that the pusillanimous CUK joins hands with the nannies on this one.

Old Greg
30th June 2008, 11:08
And I'm foookin pisssed off that the pusillanimous CUK joins hands with the nannies on this one.

They are a business with an image to maintain (:laugh).

BrilloPad
30th June 2008, 11:17
So he got 7.5% for "**** off". What would he have to put to get 100%?

malvolio
30th June 2008, 11:26
So he got 7.5% for "**** off". What would he have to put to get 100%?
Actually he wrote "Eff off". He got a point for spelling (words fail me...) and a point for expressing an emotion clearly. Had he had enough knowledge of written English to have put an exclamation mark at the end, he would have got another point.

With marking rules like that, no wonder Universities are running remedial courses for people with 5 grade As...

BrilloPad
30th June 2008, 11:30
Actually he wrote "Eff off".

:confused: it says "f--- off" in the link.

Churchill
30th June 2008, 12:46
In every ******** sentence!

Churchill's little brother!

Marina
30th June 2008, 13:15
From the article:


According to The Times, to gain minimum marks in English GSCE papers -- an exam taken by hundreds of thousands of 16-year-olds across England every year -- pupils must demonstrate "some simple sequencing of ideas" and an ability to put "some words in appropriate order".

So quite literally, a parrot could now pass a GCSE english exam :rollin:

I saw a video of one solving an intricate puzzle where it had to fit different shaped "jigsaw pieces" into corresponding slots, and it even managed it when the experimenter had already put some in the wrong slot, which it had to pull out before fitting them correctly. So that's the "sequencing of ideas" sorted.

Then the parrot would only need to squawk "f*** off", or get far more marks for "put the kettle on", and their English GCSE is in the bag. :laugh

God, what is this country coming to?

Edit: Oh wait, silly me, that would be the geometry module. So the parrot would pass GCSE maths too, and might even get into university :laugh