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scooterscot
18th February 2009, 22:25
That eco house was fantastic -

No heating or electrical costs in fact it generates so much energy they get a cheque for £1800 a year.

And it looks good took. Don't know about having a loo in the bedroom like that though. Imagine trying to sleep in that room after a night out in the town with it coming out both ends... 3 if your cyberman.

gingerjedi
18th February 2009, 22:31
One of the best I've seen, I'd like to see a breakdown of how he came to the -£1800 heating/electricity bill though?

Turion
18th February 2009, 23:00
Didn't see the prog. Do they generate heat throught rotting turds, bit like a steaming compost heap?

realityhack
18th February 2009, 23:37
linky (http://www.channel4.com/4homes/on-tv/grand-designs/episode-guides/weald-of-kent-eco-arch-the-story-09-02-18_p_1.html)

Astonishing house.

EDIT: C4 web developers... good comments in the markup, but what is with all the whitespace? Your markup formation is all over the shop, and the page designs are poor, not to mention poor x-browser compatibility. Hire yourself a usability consultant and ditch the fragmented navigation. Oh, and sort your editorial team out too.

d000hg
19th February 2009, 02:22
Very interesting, although I found the whole airtight thing a bit weird... does a letterbox really alter the integrity of the house or is it just being pretentious?

As for getting money from the house; you can buy a special meter (not sure who from but probably your energy provider) and get set up as an energy provider. It doesn't require extra infrastructure, you just push your generated power onto the national grid instead of consuming it... but you need the special meter to get paid. I've heard it can be a bit of a long-winded process getting set up but if you e.g have a windmill, you really can make a couple of grand a year (of course that's offset against the cost of installing said windmill in the first place, it's a long-term pay-off rather than a get-rich-quick scheme).

If I had that house, I would have built steps into the main arch, so I could sit on top of it and have a BBQ... imagine the view!

bored
19th February 2009, 08:21
EDIT: C4 web developers... good comments in the markup, but what is with all the whitespace? Your markup formation is all over the shop, and the page designs are poor, not to mention poor x-browser compatibility. Hire yourself a usability consultant and ditch the fragmented navigation. Oh, and sort your editorial team out too.

They also don't serve compressed pages - if they did, the whitespace would be irrelevant:



Accept-Ranges: bytes
Cache-Control: max-age=939
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2009 08:06:53 GMT
Server: Apache
X-Powered-By: Servlet/2.4 JSP/2.0
Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
X-Cache-Info: cached

200 OK

London75
19th February 2009, 10:26
Yes, it is very astonishing how you can spend a total of £780,000 and get £1,800 back per year.

Flippin hippies. Nowt green about that house. Concrete (oooh but it's made from 50% recycled materials, woop-de-doo), materials shipped from all over Europe/World.


All this while his newborn baby lived in a caravan on a building site in freezing temperatures and burst pipes.

I really hate the priorities of hippies. Oh and the hippies themselves, did I mention I hate hippies.

d000hg
19th February 2009, 10:29
Yes, it is very astonishing how you can spend a total of £780,000 and get £1,800 back per year.

Flippin hippies. Nowt green about that house. Concrete (oooh but it's made from 50% recycled materials, woop-de-doo), materials shipped from all over Europe/World.Did you watch the program? Everything they could get locally they did. And while concrete is not especially green, the 50% thing meant it's only half as bad... which is pretty green compared to a normal house.

They didn't really seem like hippies to me. No big song & dance about saving the planet, they just wanted a passive house.

London75
19th February 2009, 10:32
Did you watch the program? Everything they could get locally they did. And while concrete is not especially green, the 50% thing meant it's only half as bad... which is pretty green compared to a normal house.

They didn't really seem like hippies to me. No big song & dance about saving the planet, they just wanted a passive house.

As a father of two I suppose I just despised him for flipping about building a passive house when his baby could have really come to harm. From there I looked for any reason to hate him.

But it's either green or it's not, you can't be half green and forget the other half, he did keep saying eco home, or maybe that was Kev.

DimPrawn
19th February 2009, 10:34
As a father of two I suppose I just despised him for flipping about building a passive house when his baby could have really come to harm. From there I looked for any reason to hate him.

But it's either green or it's not, you can't be half green and forget the other half, he did keep saying eco home, or maybe that was Kev.

Green eyed monster me thinks.

DimPrawn
19th February 2009, 10:36
As for getting money from the house; you can buy a special meter (not sure who from but probably your energy provider) and get set up as an energy provider. It doesn't require extra infrastructure, you just push your generated power onto the national grid instead of consuming it... but you need the special meter to get paid. I've heard it can be a bit of a long-winded process getting set up but if you e.g have a windmill, you really can make a couple of grand a year (of course that's offset against the cost of installing said windmill in the first place, it's a long-term pay-off rather than a get-rich-quick scheme).



Yes and pay 20p per KWh to consume electricity and get paid 2p per KWh for what you generate! Money grabbing greedy fookers.

London75
19th February 2009, 10:37
Green eyed monster me thinks.

For the amount of money he's got to waste on a decadent dream yes, that's all. I am always envious of those that have the resource to build a home as that's years out of my reach at present.

Of endangering his child, no
Of his "passive" home, no
Of his Arch that could have failed catastrophically while his family were in the house, no
Of his £1800 a year to live in a house that may well smell of stale farts, no

d000hg
19th February 2009, 10:42
As a father of two I suppose I just despised him for flipping about building a passive house when his baby could have really come to harm. From there I looked for any reason to hate him.Babies don't need central heating and all that mollycoddling. We're the first generation to expect central heating as standard aren't we? And we're probably the first generation who consider it shocking to have pipes freeze and be seriously disrupted by the weather. I doubt it will have any memories or ill-effects from being a bit chilly. when many on this board probably were raised in houses with frost on the inside of windows in the winter.


But it's either green or it's not, you can't be half green and forget the other half, he did keep saying eco home, or maybe that was Kev.I think it was Kevin. He has a big thing about anything eco, not sure if that's idealism or simply a question of person taste/style.

Chugnut
19th February 2009, 10:45
For the amount of money he's got to waste on a decadent dream yes, that's all. I am always envious of those that have the resource to build a home as that's years out of my reach at present.

Of endangering his child, no
Of his "passive" home, no
Of his Arch that could have failed catastrophically while his family were in the house, no
Of his £1800 a year to live in a house that may well smell of stale farts, no

My wife met the bloke at a sustainable building show a few months back. Sounded like a decent chap. I haven't watched the prog yet.

Why would it smell? Did he have a heat recovery ventilation system which needed the building to be airtight? Should be lots of fresh air in that case. :confused:

DimPrawn
19th February 2009, 10:48
I didn't live in a house that has central heating until I was about 12 years old.

Parents house only had open coal fires and electric bar heaters.

House was either roasting hot or freezing cold (with ice on the inside of the single glazed windows).

London75
19th February 2009, 10:53
Babies don't need central heating and all that mollycoddling. We're the first generation to expect central heating as standard aren't we?

Yes they do, I'm searching for the statistics now but infant mortality rates have fallen consistently throughout the 20th century and availability of hot water, reduction in damp and mould and a sterile environment absolutely have something to do with that.

Here is a good link, although focussing on the geographical element, there is a nice chart on page 4 that shows infant mortality reducing by a factor 3 since 1970. http://www.statistics.gov.uk/articles/hsq/HSQ40-Geographical-trends.pdf

Just because we don't have to look after babies, they will probably be alright, doesn't mean we shouldn't do everything in our power to protect them.

DimPrawn
19th February 2009, 10:56
Yes they do, I'm searching for the statistics now but infant mortality rates have fallen consistently throughout the 20th century and availability of hot water, reduction in damp and mould and a sterile environment absolutely have something to do with that.

Here is a good link, although focussing on the geographical element, there is a nice chart on page 4 that shows infant mortality reducing by a factor 3 since 1970.

Just because we don't have to look after babies, they will probably be alright, doesn't mean we shouldn't do everything in our power to protect them.


What about Gypsies then? Are they evil, keeping babies and children in caravans?

London75
19th February 2009, 11:02
What about Gypsies then? Are they evil, keeping babies and children in caravans?

Ridiculous question, not evil but if they know there is a better way then perhaps a little selfish.

I also class people who let their children die due to faith issues with blood transfusions as selfish and irresponsible and I'd class gypsies in that group although not as serious.

They have a way of life that they have a degree of choice in that I would suggest (although I have no stats) leads to an increased mortality rate yet they continue to choose it.

I think I've derailed the thread. Soz.

DimPrawn
19th February 2009, 11:05
So you sort of see your central heating as life support?

Purple alert! Purple alert! Boilers on the blink. Purple alert!

:rolleyes:

Deary me, there's all sorts here.

London75
19th February 2009, 11:18
Yes I do. My youngest is 7 months old and has a nasty cold and cough. If the heating were to pack up I would send her and her mum off to her Grandma's to stay until I repaired it.

Do you actually know anything about children? Do you know how quickly a fever can turn nasty and consume a child within hours? Do you know that damp can lead to respiratory problems affecting development affecting the child for the rest of their lives?

I don't know what to say other than that I am absolutely dedicated to my children. Yes I consider heating fundamental to their welfare.

DimPrawn
19th February 2009, 11:22
Yes I do. My youngest is 7 months old and has a nasty cold and cough. If the heating were to pack up I would send her and her mum off to her Grandma's to stay until I repaired it.

Do you actually know anything about children? Do you know how quickly a fever can turn nasty and consume a child within hours? Do you know that damp can lead to respiratory problems affecting development affecting the child for the rest of their lives?

I don't know what to say other than that I am absolutely dedicated to my children. Yes I consider heating fundamental to their welfare.

Is it me or does London75 sound a bit of a nutter?

Chugnut
19th February 2009, 11:26
Yes I do. My youngest is 7 months old and has a nasty cold and cough. If the heating were to pack up I would send her and her mum off to her Grandma's to stay until I repaired it.

Do you actually know anything about children? Do you know how quickly a fever can turn nasty and consume a child within hours? Do you know that damp can lead to respiratory problems affecting development affecting the child for the rest of their lives?

I don't know what to say other than that I am absolutely dedicated to my children. Yes I consider heating fundamental to their welfare.

What on earth are you babbling on about?!

You couldn't possible plug in a few electric heaters for such an eventuality? You can pick them up for about £20 each at B&Q.

How quickly are you expecting damp to run riot throughout your house?

London75
19th February 2009, 11:28
Thanks, I've put forward my points of view about raising children, widely supported by other parents and the medical recommendations made by the NHS and the government helath bodies.

You have put forward abuse.

No probs, thanks for coming.

DimPrawn
19th February 2009, 11:30
Thanks, I've put forward my points of view about raising children, widely supported by other parents and the medical recommendations made by the NHS and the government helath bodies.

You have put forward abuse.

No probs, thanks for coming.

Calm down dear! It's only CUK ramblings.

Don't forget the jumbo pack of cotton wool to wrap them in. :smile

London75
19th February 2009, 11:31
What on earth are you babbling on about?!

You couldn't possible plug in a few electric heaters for such an eventuality? You can pick them up for about £20 each at B&Q.

How quickly are you expecting damp to run riot throughout your house?

Taking my comments out of context, I'm not suggesting a boiler fault would lead instantly to damp and problems. The two paragraphs are seperate.

Maybe I would get heaters from B&Q, not the point. You suggest replacing one heater with another which reinforces the point that heat is essential.

Chugnut
19th February 2009, 11:33
Thanks, I've put forward my points of view about raising children, widely supported by other parents and the medical recommendations made by the NHS and the government helath bodies.

You have put forward abuse.

No probs, thanks for coming.

You're welcome, anytime.

Our door's always open, but not long enough for the damp to become a problem.

London75
19th February 2009, 11:35
Calm down dear! It's only CUK ramblings.

Don't forget the jumbo pack of cotton wool to wrap them in. :smile

You did call me a nutter though :wink

I am passionate about bringing up my children to the best of my ability and despise the selfishness of many parents. There was a report recently condemning the trend for British parents to put their own needs before their children's and I have to agree that while in the minority of parents, it's a growing trend.

Just winds me up.:throw:

d000hg
19th February 2009, 11:42
It's no wonder practically all children seem to have asthma or allergies or intolerences these days - partly a soft environment gives them no chance to toughen up, and partly we are deliberately sabotaging natural selection... modern medicine coupled with over-protective upbringing means even the runt of the litter can be kept alive long enough to pass on their lackluster genes.

And no I don't advocate killing weedy children, but while I'm deliberately playing devil's advocate I think there is a serious issue, albeit hugely emotive.

DimPrawn
19th February 2009, 11:44
It's no wonder practically all children seem to have asthma or allergies or intolerences these days - partly a soft environment gives them no chance to toughen up, and partly we are deliberately sabotaging natural selection... modern medicine coupled with over-protective upbringing means even the runt of the litter can be kept alive long enough to pass on their lackluster genes.

And no I don't advocate killing weedy children, but while I'm deliberately playing devil's advocate I think there is a serious issue, albeit hugely emotive.

Bring em up tough. 5th birthday, boxing gloves. :cool:

gingerjedi
19th February 2009, 11:53
The guy wasn’t a hippie, as an architect he just wanted to build a house with green credentials… and a girt big arch made from terracotta tiles for whatever reason??

Now all he needs to do is design one with similar technology that Redrow can throw up for 50k, energy crises sorted. :smile

BrilloPad
19th February 2009, 12:13
You did call me a nutter though :wink

I am passionate about bringing up my children to the best of my ability and despise the selfishness of many parents. There was a report recently condemning the trend for British parents to put their own needs before their children's and I have to agree that while in the minority of parents, it's a growing trend.

Just winds me up.:throw:

You have 106 posts and you have not learnt yet that general is inhabited mostly by trolls? :confused:

tim123
19th February 2009, 13:01
One of the best I've seen, I'd like to see a breakdown of how he came to the -£1800 heating/electricity bill though?

So would I.

He said that he generated excess "heat" that he could sell. Who the hell to?

to the OP. The house had solar panels. Presumably they generared extra electricity, but 1800 pounds of it still seems an awful lot.

tim

Clippy
19th February 2009, 13:05
You did call me a nutter though :wink

I am passionate about bringing up my children to the best of my ability and despise the selfishness of many parents. There was a report recently condemning the trend for British parents to put their own needs before their children's and I have to agree that while in the minority of parents, it's a growing trend.

Just winds me up.:throw:

Best not watch SuperNanny then!

Chugnut
19th February 2009, 13:24
So would I.

He said that he generated excess "heat" that he could sell. Who the hell to?

to the OP. The house had solar panels. Presumably they generared extra electricity, but 1800 pounds of it still seems an awful lot.

tim

Did they have wind turbines & PV panels too? If the house was super-insulated and had lots of low-voltage fittings, they could certainly have generated a surplus. Wind at night generating power which isn't being drawn off / solar during the day when they're out, etc.

They must have spent a few quid overspeccing the tech to be satisfying all their needs and clearing £150 per month on average though.

I look forward to watching it later.