PDA

View Full Version : £1,300 fine paid in pennies refused



Liability
19th February 2009, 17:02
LOOOL



£1,300 fine paid in pennies refused
£1,300 fine paid in pennies refused
A city council refused to accept a supermarket trolley holding almost half a tonne of pennies from a wheel-clamper as payment for a £1,300 debt.
The shopping trolley, which requires three men to move it, was delivered in a van to trading standards offices in Birmingham by wheel-clamper Gary Southall.
The 48-year-old, from Digbeth, Birmingham, had hoped that the pennies would pay legal costs he owes to the city council after a court action in January.

http://news.uk.msn.com/odd-news/article.aspx?cp-documentid=14352431

Board Game Geek
19th February 2009, 17:05
They refused to accept legal tender ?

Hmmmm....

Liability
19th February 2009, 17:07
They refused to accept legal tender ?

Hmmmm....

that's what I thought - do they have the right to do that? I guess he could have left it there and had it signed as Recieved.

But good on him! :D

PRC1964
19th February 2009, 17:10
They refused to accept legal tender ?

Hmmmm....


The amounts you have to accept are quite low. I know as a result of trying to bank a load of coins raised by the school PTA.

See here for more: http://www.royalmint.com/Corporate/policies/legal_tender_guidelines.aspx

21p in 1p coins is too much. Only 20p counts as leagl tender.

Bagpuss
19th February 2009, 17:11
Which is more hateful, a wheel-clamper or a council official?

Looking again he delivered to trading standards, so he's hardly an honest member of the public!

Board Game Geek
19th February 2009, 17:13
Baggie posted : Which is more hateful, a wheel-clamper or a council official?

Neither.

I'd opt for either a dentist doing root canal treatment on his wife's lover, or a vasectomy surgeon working on his wife's bit-on-the-side.

expat
19th February 2009, 17:33
They refused to accept legal tender ?

Hmmmm....No, they didn't. That was not legal tender (http://www.royalmint.com/corporate/policies/legal_tender_guidelines.aspx):


Coins are legal tender throughout the United Kingdom for the following amount:

£5 (Crown) - for any amount
£2 - for any amount
£1 - for any amount
50p - for any amount not exceeding £10
25p (Crown) - for any amount not exceeding £10
20p - for any amount not exceeding £10
10p - for any amount not exceeding £5
5p - for any amount not exceeding £5
2p - for any amount not exceeding 20p
1p - for any amount not exceeding 20pAs a curious addendum, no notes are legal tender in Scotland. (Scottish and English notes are legal, just not legal tender).

Finkels
19th February 2009, 17:37
No, they didn't. That was not legal tender (http://www.royalmint.com/corporate/policies/legal_tender_guidelines.aspx):

As a curious addendum, no notes are legal tender in Scotland. (Scottish and English notes are legal, just not legal tender).And that's only for paying into a court. Elsewhere, there is no concept of legal tender.

BrilloPad
19th February 2009, 17:55
The amounts you have to accept are quite low. I know as a result of trying to bank a load of coins raised by the school PTA.

See here for more: http://www.royalmint.com/Corporate/policies/legal_tender_guidelines.aspx

21p in 1p coins is too much. Only 20p counts as leagl tender.

I was in a taxi a while ago there was a sign saying that change does not have to be tendered : is that true?

tim123
19th February 2009, 20:32
I was in a taxi a while ago there was a sign saying that change does not have to be tendered : is that true?


yes

tim

expat
19th February 2009, 20:53
And that's only for paying into a court. Elsewhere, there is no concept of legal tender.The Royal Mint link quoted by PRC1964 and me says otherwise, but you may know better than they do. Maybe.

Finkels
20th February 2009, 10:00
The Royal Mint link quoted by PRC1964 and me says otherwise, but you may know better than they do. Maybe.
It means that a debtor cannot successfully be sued for non-payment if he pays into court in legal tender.Or I may know what they state. Maybe you know better though?