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cojak
10th March 2009, 16:06
A contracting philosophical question…

I know that this wouldn’t trouble many of the more hard-nosed of you out there but I’m currently wrangling with this at the moment as my current contract runs till the end of March, so would appreciate your advice…

The project I’m in lasts until the end of August and I’m in the plan till then and am providing a large deliverable that has a considerable impact on the success of the project.

However… Agents are now calling with a view to tempt me away with better rates and longer duration of contract.

I’m torn with the fact that I’d be leaving mid-project, even though I would simply not take the extension…

I’m used to contracts lasting the same length of time as the project so this conflict doesn’t crop up.

What is the panel’s view on this?

(NB. I'm leaning to continue for professional pride, but does business pragmatism conflict with this?)

Mich the Tester
10th March 2009, 16:10
I was planned in for work up until July, but contract ends 31 march with no extension AND rate was cut for last two months. ClientCo is desperately trying to save money, even to the point of turning down the heating.

They'll dump you at the drop of a hat, so why should they expect better?

swamp
10th March 2009, 16:10
Permietractor.

Burn him!

Zippy
10th March 2009, 16:16
You've got to do what is best for your business. Stay if you think there is a good chance of repeat work in the future but go if you can make a lot more elsewhere.

scooterscot
10th March 2009, 16:18
Facing a very similar situation. Expect better rates elsewhere are not the only driver. The micromanagement of the client is driving me nuts. They've pencilled me in until August although I've a renewal due just one week into April, I'm very tempted to jump, full well knowing the impact this will have on reputation - I work in a very small industry so perhaps this is some gauge how naffed off I am with the client.

"Look after number one, look after yourself"

This is what I hear from friends and family more often than not and I agree. It would not be the first time I've jumped mid-project despite how guilty it may make me feel but you've got to look after yourself in the end.

The previous jump I made was purely money motivated. How quickly would your client drop you if they run into financial situation? yeah.

chris79
10th March 2009, 16:20
Facing a very similar situation. Expect better rates elsewhere are not the only driver. The micromanagement of the client is driving me nuts. They've pencilled me in until August although I've a renewal due just one week into April, I'm very tempted to jump, full well knowing the impact this will have on reputation - I work in a very small industry so perhaps this is some gauge how naffed off I am with the client.

"Look after number one, look after yourself"

This is what I hear from friends and family more often than not and I agree. It would not be the first time I've jumped mid-project despite how guilty it may make me feel but you've got to look after yourself in the end.

The previous jump I made was purely money motivated. How quickly would your client drop you if they run into financial situation? yeah.

Why not sit down with the client and explain the aggravation their causing to you, and let them give it a chance. At least if you leave you can turn round and say "told you so".

scooterscot
10th March 2009, 16:23
Why not sit down with the client and explain the aggravation their causing to you, and let them give it a chance. At least if you leave you can turn round and say "told you so".

I have already. I've actually not turned up on site this week so far choosing to work off-site, I've made much more progress already.

They've gone ballistic - still they've not fired me. Trust is out the window with them.

Hopefully, next week, I can demonstrate the progress that's been made without interruption & control.

minestrone
10th March 2009, 16:24
I always take the view that you are just a number to these places, but I would take the chance to tell the number who is in charge of you what the situation is, then leave.

Mich the Tester
10th March 2009, 16:26
Why not sit down with the client and explain the aggravation their causing to you, and let them give it a chance. At least if you leave you can turn round and say "told you so".
I did that. I told them the internal bureaucracy was making testing impossible and thereby creating even greater risks to service continuity than the shitware they buy from Mr Shawadiwadi’s ICT emporium. It didn’t help; they haven’t got any money to improve matters. My argument that they can’t afford to keep things the way they are doesn’t get anywhere.

Svalbaard
10th March 2009, 16:32
A contracting philosophical question…

I’m torn with the fact that I’d be leaving mid-project, even though I would simply not take the extension…

I’m used to contracts lasting the same length of time as the project so this conflict doesn’t crop up.

What is the panel’s view on this?

Sit down with current client co. and explain situation. If no proper extension is forthcoming then you have to look after yourself, understand that this is now not your issue and move on.

BlasterBates
10th March 2009, 17:07
A contracting philosophical question…

I know that this wouldn’t trouble many of the more hard-nosed of you out there but I’m currently wrangling with this at the moment as my current contract runs till the end of March, so would appreciate your advice…

The project I’m in lasts until the end of August and I’m in the plan till then and am providing a large deliverable that has a considerable impact on the success of the project.

However… Agents are now calling with a view to tempt me away with better rates and longer duration of contract.

I’m torn with the fact that I’d be leaving mid-project, even though I would simply not take the extension…

I’m used to contracts lasting the same length of time as the project so this conflict doesn’t crop up.

What is the panel’s view on this?

(NB. I'm leaning to continue for professional pride, but does business pragmatism conflict with this?)


Hey Cojak that isn't a problem, I can almost here the sound of sawing as other contractors remove their arms to move into your position.

:smile

Gonzo
10th March 2009, 21:43
A contracting philosophical question…

I know that this wouldn’t trouble many of the more hard-nosed of you out there but I’m currently wrangling with this at the moment as my current contract runs till the end of March, so would appreciate your advice…

The project I’m in lasts until the end of August and I’m in the plan till then and am providing a large deliverable that has a considerable impact on the success of the project.

However… Agents are now calling with a view to tempt me away with better rates and longer duration of contract.

I’m torn with the fact that I’d be leaving mid-project, even though I would simply not take the extension…

I’m used to contracts lasting the same length of time as the project so this conflict doesn’t crop up.

What is the panel’s view on this?

(NB. I'm leaning to continue for professional pride, but does business pragmatism conflict with this?)Personally, I would be OK with not taking the extension.

I wouldn't walk mid-contract, but that is different.

I have found myself "in the project plan" before and have suspected that this was only because of the PM's sense of loyalty keeping me supplied with work, when all along I would have been happy to be out of there. I find that a frank off-site discussion usually sorts this out.

Of course, if you are the PM, then you should probably see the project to completion unless it is one of those unmanageable bohemoths that wreck the lives of several PMs before it is abandoned.

cojak
10th March 2009, 21:51
Thanks for the words of wisdom chaps.
I'll probably stay but I'll bearing in mind the 'end of contract' trumps 'mid-project' principle in future...

d000hg
10th March 2009, 22:28
I’m torn with the fact that I’d be leaving mid-project, even though I would simply not take the extension…

I’m used to contracts lasting the same length of time as the project so this conflict doesn’t crop up.

What is the panel’s view on this?

(NB. I'm leaning to continue for professional pride, but does business pragmatism conflict with this?)Back to the old comparison... if your builder left half-way through a job what would you think? Would you recommend him to anyone?
That doesn't mean you shouldn't leave of course... but part of being a business is perhaps an air of professionalism which is not to grab a quick buck, but provide high quality workmanship.

Archangel
11th March 2009, 07:59
Back to the old comparison... if your builder left half-way through a job what would you think? Would you recommend him to anyone?
That doesn't mean you shouldn't leave of course... but part of being a business is perhaps an air of professionalism which is not to grab a quick buck, but provide high quality workmanship.

If I employed a builder the contract would last until the end of the job.

In this case the client should have given a six month contract in the first place.

jmo21
11th March 2009, 08:33
Back to the old comparison... if your builder left half-way through a job what would you think? Would you recommend him to anyone?
That doesn't mean you shouldn't leave of course... but part of being a business is perhaps an air of professionalism which is not to grab a quick buck, but provide high quality workmanship.

Yeah, and a builder would be the first to give a ****!

Mate of mine paid half up front for a new drive way and patio, with the driveway being more than 3 times the size of the patio. builder did the drive first, but refused to come back to do the patio as it was no longer worth it for him.

That being said, I do agree with the point made. I generally prefer to renew my contract whenever they are offered. In the current climate you'd be mad not too, but even in more buoyant times, I prefer to keep my client as happy as possible in order to hopefully win repeat business down the line.

pmeswani
11th March 2009, 08:43
Thanks for the words of wisdom chaps.
I'll probably stay but I'll bearing in mind the 'end of contract' trumps 'mid-project' principle in future...

Any substitution clauses in either contract? Could you not bring someone in to do your work at the other client until you are able to commit to it?

Ivor Bigun
11th March 2009, 09:05
A contracting philosophical question…

The project I’m in lasts until the end of August and I’m in the plan till then and am providing a large deliverable that has a considerable impact on the success of the project.

However… Agents are now calling with a view to tempt me away with better rates and longer duration of contract.

What is the panel’s view on this?

(NB. I'm leaning to continue for professional pride, but does business pragmatism conflict with this?)

A bird in the hand...........

When you're consistantly in contract, everyone thinks
"Hey I'm doing OK - Once again I've boomed - I don't need to worry - something will turn up"

When you've been on the bench for too long, you start thinking
"Heck, I'm a businessperson (!), I'll undercut your existing resource just to cut a sniff of a job - I'll even work the first week for free"

IMO, we are now at the start of the worst period of IT employment in the UK that we will ever see in our lifetime and it will last 10 years.
The goal today is to keep being employed (at whatever cost)

Don't kid yourself Cojak, if you were on the bench, this would NOT be happening.
- Agent knows its a "live" position
- Agent knows that your termination damms you to the client (you can't go back but the agent can replace you)

dang65
11th March 2009, 10:31
I'm in the same position as others here. Contract ends 31 March, but all project meetings refer to work till at least June, and always include me when talking about who will be doing what. I enjoy the thought that I'm free to go in a couple of weeks, while knowing that they want me here after that time and it's just a bit of admin that needs to be done if I want stay. 9 or 12 month gigs which split into 3 month contracts are fine by me, and completely routine. Also offers scope for rate negotiation, though I realise that might not be to the contractor's advantage right now (taken one small rate cut already :mad - though the euro exchange rate actually meant I was still on a better rate than when I started :freaky:).

ziggy
11th March 2009, 10:43
i'm with ivor ... stick with what you have as things are going to get a lot worse ...