PDA

View Full Version : What makes a good pub - "Moon Under Water"



minestrone
12th March 2009, 17:06
Where I live, and for a few miles around where traditional dry areas, there are no real pubs, just hotel bars. So I have the choice of the wine bar hotel pub or walk 15 minutes to the crossroads type motel and it's ye old England type place. So I buy the times, head of to plastic England for a couple of pints and start reading the following essay...

Moon under water (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/article5890533.ece)

I never noticed for a couple of minutes that it was written 60 years ago, I never noticed at first it was an Orwell essay, 99% of it is still true.

expat
12th March 2009, 17:19
Where I live, and for a few miles around were traditional dry areas, there are no real pubs, just hotel bars. So I have the choice of the wine bar hotel pub or walk 15 minutes to the crossroads type motel and it's ye old England type place. So I buy the times, head of to plastic England for a couple of pints and start reading the following essay...

Moon under water (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/article5890533.ece)

I never noticed for a couple of minutes that it was written 60 years ago, I never noticed at first it was an Orwell essay, 99% of it is still true.Especially the bit where he admits that it doesn't exist.

In the 1970s I did frequent a pub called the Gaiety, just off Kensington High Street, which I most liked because it was the opposite of its name: with a high dark ceiling, long dark red curtains, and leather seats, it had no jukebox, no piped music, no TV, no fruit machines, and none of this damned new Space Invaders stuff. Just talk. I loved it. It really did exist, but of course it didn't last.

thunderlizard
12th March 2009, 17:20
George Orwell's real-life favourite pubs (still standing) were the Newman Arms, Rathbone Street W1, and The Fitzroy Tavern, Charlotte Street W1.

Fitzroy Tavern is a shadow of its former self but the Newman Arms is still a cracker and sells fine pies to boot.

Foxy Moron
12th March 2009, 17:22
Ironic that one should avoid any pub with the name "Moon under Water"
Usually now they are Wetherspoons

Gonzo
12th March 2009, 20:29
Where I live, and for a few miles around where traditional dry areas, there are no real pubs, just hotel bars. So I have the choice of the wine bar hotel pub or walk 15 minutes to the crossroads type motel and it's ye old England type place. So I buy the times, head of to plastic England for a couple of pints and start reading the following essay...

Moon under water (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/article5890533.ece)

I never noticed for a couple of minutes that it was written 60 years ago, I never noticed at first it was an Orwell essay, 99% of it is still true.So, did he ever find a pub that
has draught stout, open fires, cheap meals, a garden, motherly barmaids and no radioDo we know where that is?

Moscow Mule
12th March 2009, 21:40
Do we know where that is?

Were I to find such a haven of a place, only a very few fine fellows of my acquaintance would ever hear of it.

minestrone
12th March 2009, 21:52
Shocked nobody picked up on my post two pint spelling misaykes in the OP.

I think the Moulin Inn gets at least 8 out 10.

Gonzo
12th March 2009, 22:19
Shocked nobody picked up on my post two pint spelling misaykes in the OP.You've had a shocker with the punctuation too but I am not in a pedantic mood today. :rolleyes:

Spacecadet
12th March 2009, 22:23
get out of the sh*te hole cities and into the country side and you can find some very nice pubs

minestrone
12th March 2009, 22:30
You've had a shocker with the punctuation too but I am not in a pedantic mood today. :rolleyes:

Stella. what can, I say?

TykeMerc
13th March 2009, 01:39
Excluding the garden, china mugs and it being up a side street there's a pub in Preston that's damn close to what he described including the victorian design features. Beer in there is excellent too.

I'm buggered if I can remember the name, I'll have to check with a friend that drinks there most weeks.

scotspine
13th March 2009, 08:38
Shocked nobody picked up on my post two pint spelling misaykes in the OP.

I think the Moulin Inn gets at least 8 out 10.

whs. a very fine place indeed. and of course so is the tigh an truish.

Gold Dalek
13th March 2009, 08:56
no fruit machines, and none of this damned new Space Invaders stuff. Space Invaders... pah!

Drewster
13th March 2009, 09:04
In the 1970s I did frequent a pub called the Gaiety, just off Kensington High Street, which I most liked because it was the opposite of its name: with a high dark ceiling, long dark red curtains, and leather seats, it had no jukebox, no piped music, no TV, no fruit machines, and none of this damned new Space Invaders stuff.

It didn't last because they moved The Gaiety to a side street in Birmingham (just behind the Grand Hotel) in the early 80s.... exactly as you describe. They sold "M&B Springfield" - one of the worst gnats piss keg beers (OK I know thats tautology) ever invented and your feet stuck to the floor anywhere within a 10ft radius of the bar....

Its only redeeming features were (to be honest fairly compelling features at the time) its proximity to the Student Nurses Home (or more accurately the fact that the Student Nurses went there)

Mich the Tester
13th March 2009, 10:02
Were I to find such a haven of a place, only a very few fine fellows of my acquaintance would ever hear of it.Occasionally when I visit the UK I stumble upon a really good pub. We went to one somewhere near Corby several years ago while driving from Harwich to Birmingham. Trouble is I’ve never found it again and I can’t remember the name; if I could remember, I still don’t know whether I’d tell anyone. However, it was Mrs Tester’s first visit to a real English pub and she was very impressed at the friendliness, good food and generally homely feeling to the place. After a few more UK visits she asked ‘why don’t they have more places like that one near Corby. Surely they’d do a roaring trade?’ I tried to explain that there used to be lots of them, but somehow they seem to have died out’.

Drewster
13th March 2009, 10:09
....really good pub....near Corby.....impressed at the friendliness, good food and generally homely feeling......

Mich - I find it very hard to believe you found anything matching that description ANYWHERE NEAR Corby......

Although I guess the definition of "near" might account for it.....

Mich the Tester
13th March 2009, 10:19
Mich - I find it very hard to believe you found anything matching that description ANYWHERE NEAR Corby......

Although I guess the definition of "near" might account for it.....Really! It was like finding a precious gemstone in an oily cesspit.

zara_backdog
13th March 2009, 10:26
It didn't last because they moved The Gaiety to a side street in Birmingham (just behind the Grand Hotel) in the early 80s.... exactly as you describe. They sold "M&B Springfield" - one of the worst gnats piss keg beers (OK I know thats tautology) ever invented and your feet stuck to the floor anywhere within a 10ft radius of the bar....

Its only redeeming features were (to be honest fairly compelling features at the time) its proximity to the Student Nurses Home (or more accurately the fact that the Student Nurses went there)


Ah - I remember The Gaiety - hic!

Drewster
13th March 2009, 10:30
Really! It was like finding a precious gemstone in an oily cesspit.

How philosophical..... personally I never rummage in Cesspits....
To be fair as long as you stay outside about a 7mile radius of Corby and avoid the Corridior of Hell between Corby and Kettering there are (still) a fair few decent pubs in the surrounding villages.... but not once the Townies discover them!