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contractor79
29th June 2009, 22:42
If you start a 6 month contract then realise after a few weeks you don't like it, what would you do? It's especially hard to move to another one somewhere else if there's a month notice on your side of the deal. Do you just stick it out for 6 months then move on after they refuse to pay you at least £100/day more on renewal?

pzz76077
29th June 2009, 22:43
If you start a 6 month contract then realise after a few weeks you don't like it, what would you do? It's especially hard to move to another one somewhere else if there's a month notice on your side of the deal. Do you just stick it out for 6 months then move on after they refuse to pay you at least £100/day more on renewal?

What dont you like about it?? Tell us more.

PZz

contractor79
29th June 2009, 22:44
What dont you like about it?? Tell us more.

PZz

it doesn't matter what the reasons are, just asking a general question

pzz76077
29th June 2009, 22:54
it doesn't matter what the reasons are, just asking a general question

Usually, I try to honor my commitments, most contracts are a pain in the ass one way or another, there is no guarantee that the next one will be any better.

However, you could try: not going in any more, giving less notice and doing a deal with the agent somehow, getting someone else to do your work for the duration of the contract (assuming there is a substitution clause in your contract), speak with the agent and see if they can move you elsewhere.

Probably a load of other things as well.

PZZ

contractor79
29th June 2009, 23:02
well another recruiter told me about another contract that pays twice my rate and sounds more interesting plus better location, but due to month's notice on this dull contract then that would count against my application as they need someone NOW

could they, or perhaps more importantly would they chase after someone who just walks out on a contract after being there a month or two? as in many contracts it takes few weeks just to get started

RichardCranium
29th June 2009, 23:02
If you start a 6 month contract then realise after a few weeks you don't like it, what would you do?Personally, I try to stick it out. I don't think I have ever walked before the end of the first term. I have left during an extension. Some say that is bad practice; they weren't living my life.


It's especially hard to move to another one somewhere else if there's a month notice on your side of the deal.You'd love a no-termination clause!

So contractually, you can scarper in a month. Perfectly legit and legal. This is business, after all. So that is one option. Some would say it's letting down the client, but they're getting an entire month's notice and the others they interviewed are probably still on the bench!

You can get out sooner. Telling the client and agent how unhappy you are (some would suggest inventing a family crisis but I won't) can get you out very quickly.


Do you just stick it out for 6 months then move on after they refuse to pay you at least £100/day more on renewal?Nobody can force you to renew. You do not have to give any reasons why you don't want to renew, either.

Is there any benefit to you staying? Are there new skills you could pick up? Can you decide to spend the six months buggering about and learning new skills at your desk in ClientCo time?

Can you see it as an opportunity to earn £x,000 while adding experience to your CV and contacts to your network?

Have you noticed how quiet it is out here, despite there being so many of us on the bench?

Could you talk to someone at the client and say you're not happy? I know it is an odd thing for a contractor to do but there are those of us out there who manage contractors and treat them like people. It may be possible they can change your working hours (Mon lunch to Fri lunch ror Mon to Thur doing long hours), let you work from home, give you more responsibility, get you more involved, make it more challenging. It might be possible to fix the reason.

As a supervisor with many years of staff management experience, I know I can retain an unhappy member of staff by looking concerned and repeatedly tweaking their working conditions for over a year. You've only got to do another five months. It really will not take long to pass, if you spend the time planning what you are going to be doing in five months and one day's time.

Work out the profit you'll make on those six months. Of that, let yourself have 20% to spend on something frivolous as a "end of contract reward". That 20% "motivational bonus" is a damn site more cost effective than being on the bench!

Try and stick it out. You'll be proud of yourself in the future if you do and it will make you stronger too.

RichardCranium
29th June 2009, 23:04
well another recruiter:spel professional liar


told me about another contract that pays twice my rate and sounds more interesting plus better location, but due to month's notice on this dull contract then that would count against my application as they need someone NOWYou are considering going into breach of contract with all the pain that might entail just to earn the agent some commission?

Do. Not. Do. It.

Beware: the grass is always greener...

contractor79
29th June 2009, 23:05
thanks
yes I will stick it out, it's not as bad as it sounds, just wondering what the possibilities were in case I find myself in a real stinker in future. But by then I'll have much more £££ behind me and will be a grumpy old man so won't care as much about commitment etc.

SlimRick
30th June 2009, 07:19
Bring in the substitution clause and take on the new contract whilst taking a percentage of your subs rate :smile

BlackenedBiker
30th June 2009, 07:27
:spel professional liar

You are considering going into breach of contract with all the pain that might entail just to earn the agent some commission?

Do. Not. Do. It.

Beware: the grass is always greener...

WHS +1000000

Only leave if it is a MUCH MUCH better contract than the one you are on. For instance if it is going to get you through the next year and the current contract is for a month. Otherwise it probably best to count your blessings and keep your head down and pimp the CV with new skills and glowing references

The Lone Gunman
30th June 2009, 07:37
well another recruiter told me about another contract that pays twice my rate and sounds more interesting plus better location, but due to month's notice on this dull contract then that would count against my application as they need someone NOW

could they, or perhaps more importantly would they chase after someone who just walks out on a contract after being there a month or two? as in many contracts it takes few weeks just to get startedThe "other" recruiter wants you to hand in your notice. He can then ring the firm "on spec" and surprisingly there will be a vacancy. He will offer to fill it at a lower rate and will find someone to take your place. Thus he is earning something from a place where he was earning nothing.
Strangely, the super job you were told about will vanish.

I would always say honour your commiments, but if you are truely unhappy then you are probably not doing a good job so it might be better all round to walk.
As others have said, talk to the client and negotiate rather than doing one.
If you just cant stand it then you could always start a punch up or touch up the secretary.

Fred Bloggs
30th June 2009, 07:56
Only leave if it is a MUCH MUCH better contract than the one you are on. For instance if it is going to get you through the next year and the current contract is for a month.IMO, many clients would be quite happy for you to walk if that was the case even if they felt let down by you.

Pogle
30th June 2009, 07:58
When I start a new contract I stop looking at job boards and discussing anything with agents for at least the first two months, a month before Its up I start putting feelers out again.
I don't want to see the perfect job at twice my current rate on my doorstep advertised - so I shut my eyes.
I have signed a contract and I will stick to it, call me old fashioned, but that's how I am.

Moscow Mule
30th June 2009, 08:00
If you start a 6 month contract then realise after a few weeks you don't like it, what would you do?

Harden the **** up...

sasguru
30th June 2009, 08:02
If you start a 6 month contract then realise after a few weeks you don't like it, what would you do?

Was your god's answer unsatisfactory so you had to come to CUK? :laugh

RichardCranium
30th June 2009, 08:07
... hand in your notice ... someone to take your place ... Strangely, the super job you were told about will vanish.This is why I frequent CUK for advice. I get called cynical, devious, underhand, calculating and manipulating.

Then someone points out how much lower agents are.

contractor79
28th July 2009, 21:21
Harden the **** up...


I'm already loaded after 3+ years as a permitractor. Money less of a factor now, enjoyment of work and the people there means more. So, I can't be bothered working alongside or for tulipholes.

Numptycorner
28th July 2009, 21:34
Wwgd?

TykeMerc
28th July 2009, 21:43
When I start a new contract I stop looking at job boards and discussing anything with agents for at least the first two months, a month before Its up I start putting feelers out again.
I don't want to see the perfect job at twice my current rate on my doorstep advertised - so I shut my eyes.
I have signed a contract and I will stick to it, call me old fashioned, but that's how I am.

What she said.

I despise contractors who dump a current contract commitment purely for a slightly prettier one. It's people who do that that have tarred all contractors with a "fly by night, unreliable" reputation which we all have to fight against.

I thought you religious types were supposed to uphold a moral code, surely sticking to your promises is a moral issue.

BrilloPad
29th July 2009, 08:13
If you start a 6 month contract then realise after a few weeks you don't like it, what would you do? It's especially hard to move to another one somewhere else if there's a month notice on your side of the deal. Do you just stick it out for 6 months then move on after they refuse to pay you at least £100/day more on renewal?

I had it happen to me once : I walked. Then I hid the job on my cv.

zamzummim
29th July 2009, 08:21
Do whatever is best interest for your company :) havign a happy director/employees is good for the company, but having happy satisfied clients is also in the company's best interest!

AlfredJPruffock
29th July 2009, 08:44
well another recruiter told me about another contract that pays twice my rate and sounds more interesting plus better location


I forsee a lot of this sudden quitting of contracts as contractors who accepted low rates will - of course - jump at the prospect of being offered a rate which is more realistic for the market.

The upshot - dissatisfied client.

Amiga500
29th July 2009, 09:05
If you start a 6 month contract then realise after a few weeks you don't like it, what would you do? It's especially hard to move to another one somewhere else if there's a month notice on your side of the deal. Do you just stick it out for 6 months then move on after they refuse to pay you at least £100/day more on renewal?

Start a big argument with a permie over email, include any heads of department on the cc line. You'll get a call from the agent within a couple of days and immediate termination. This works, trust me.