PDA

View Full Version : Top 3



Menelaus
30th June 2009, 10:02
Here's a thread in which we can vent our spleens (pre-splenectomy, naturally) and list our top three "professions" against the wall when the revolution comes.

For me:

Journalists - redtops and tabloids first (tabloids includes the Daily Heil)

Lawyers - ambulance chasing twunts first

Recruitment Consultants - paternalist client owners ("MY client") first

Who's on your list?

bogeyman
30th June 2009, 10:07
Here's a thread in which we can vent our spleens (pre-splenectomy, naturally) and list our top three "professions" against the wall when the revolution comes.

For me:

Journalists - redtops and tabloids first (tabloids includes the Daily Heil)

Lawyers - ambulance chasing twunts first

Recruitment Consultants - paternalist client owners ("MY client") first

Who's on your list?

Doctors (GPs). I normally avoid medics at all costs, but have recently developed quite severe lower back pain, so went along to surgery and got treated like an idiot by some slip of a girl younger than my daughter.

Back in Canada next month so will try to get it sorted there. Hellishly expensive but at least you get treated like a human being.

Oh, them and Estate Agents - obviously.

Mich the Tester
30th June 2009, 10:10
Tax inspectors

sasguru
30th June 2009, 10:10
Doctors (GPs). I normally avoid medics at all costs, but have recently developed quite severe lower back pain, so went along to surgery and got treated like an idiot by some slip of a girl younger than my daughter.

Back in Canada next month so will try to get it sorted there. Hellishly expensive but at least you get treated like a human being.

Oh, them and Estate Agents - obviously.

Sorry there is no treatment for most back pain. That's probably what "the slip of a girl" was trying to tell you.

sasguru
30th June 2009, 10:13
How about insular, ignorant IT bods with zero personal skills who think that their knowledge of Java (or whatever) qualifies them for godlike status and makes them pontificate on matters which they know nothing about.

bogeyman
30th June 2009, 10:14
Sorry there is no treatment for most back pain. That's probably what "the slip of a girl" was trying to tell you.

There is treatment for many types of back pain, in fact. At the very minimum there is palliative care to reduce pain.

The 'slip of a girl' did not impart any such information, was sullen and generally unhelpful.

bogeyman
30th June 2009, 10:15
How about insular, ignorant IT bods with zero personal skills who think that their knowledge of Java (or whatever) qualifies them for godlike status and makes them pontificate on matters which they know nothing about.

Whereas your personal skills are clearly outstanding. Well done.

Menelaus
30th June 2009, 10:17
There is treatment for many types of back pain, in fact. At the very minimum there is palliative care to reduce pain.

The 'slip of a girl' did not impart any such information, was sullen and generally unhelpful.

You might find that a TENS machine might help you?

The ex-Mrs Menelaus when in labour with Menelauette had a TENS machine and it was apparently wonderful.

Drewster
30th June 2009, 10:17
How about insular, ignorant IT bods with zero personal skills who think that their knowledge of Java (or whatever) qualifies them for godlike status and makes them pontificate on matters which they know nothing about.

:spel :moon:bandit

Try to be brief man!

Amiga500
30th June 2009, 10:18
Traffic wardens and Hector.

Oh, and maybe PCSOs.

BlackenedBiker
30th June 2009, 10:20
How about insular, ignorant IT bods with zero personal skills who think that their knowledge of Java (or whatever) qualifies them for godlike status and makes them pontificate on matters which they know nothing about.

I am with you.

GoodBye Cruel World I am putting you out of my misery
:suicide::suicide::suicide::suicide::suicide:

bogeyman
30th June 2009, 10:22
You might find that a TENS machine might help you?

The ex-Mrs Menelaus when in labour with Menelauette had a TENS machine and it was apparently wonderful.

Yes. Thanks. I might well give that a go. Just a bit concerned that there may be a more serious underlying problem.

Menelaus
30th June 2009, 10:32
Yes. Thanks. I might well give that a go. Just a bit concerned that there may be a more serious underlying problem.

Indeed.

Lower back pain can be a symptom of a variety of maladies, including renal issues. Does it hurt when you pee? This isn't an STD question, more a question to determine possibility of kidney stones.

Your GP should've offered you a urine test at the very least. Suspect a trip to your local pharmacy for some BM sticks may be in order for you to do a quick self test. These have reagents on them that react to a variety of occult materials in your urine - e.g., protein, glucose, blood etc.

NOTE: for the avoidance of doubt, I'm not a doctor, nurse or in any other way qualified to offer this information. It's not a diagnosis and should not be treated as such. I am a statistician / mathematician geek who happens to be interested in medicine.

bogeyman
30th June 2009, 10:35
Indeed.

Lower back pain can be a symptom of a variety of maladies, including renal issues. Does it hurt when you pee? This isn't an STD question, more a question to determine possibility of kidney stones.

Your GP should've offered you a urine test at the very least. Suspect a trip to your local pharmacy for some BM sticks may be in order for you to do a quick self test. These have reagents on them that react to a variety of occult materials in your urine - e.g., protein, glucose, blood etc.

NOTE: for the avoidance of doubt, I'm not a doctor, nurse or in any other way qualified to offer this information. It's not a diagnosis and should not be treated as such. I am a statistician / mathematician geek who happens to be interested in medicine.

I did cross my mind that it could be renal but seems a bit lower down and definitely spinal. The pain is very localised.

Alf W
30th June 2009, 10:41
Traffic police
PR 'gurus'
Finance Dept people who think they know how to run businesses by numbers

bogeyman
30th June 2009, 10:42
'Creatives'

Facilitators

Chairpersons

BlackenedBiker
30th June 2009, 10:46
Empire Builders

Know-it-Alls

Know Nothings

Not job types but irritating personality traits

Menelaus
30th June 2009, 10:47
I did cross my mind that it could be renal but seems a bit lower down and definitely spinal. The pain is very localised.

Localised around the spine?

Have you any tingling sensations any further down, e.g., lower extremeties (toes / feet / ankles)? This would be an indicator of possible trapped nerves, perhaps.

I'd certainly nip down to A&E if your GP was useless.

sasguru
30th June 2009, 10:47
Whereas your personal skills are clearly outstanding. Well done.

Thank you. I like to think so.

DaveB
30th June 2009, 10:48
I did cross my mind that it could be renal but seems a bit lower down and definitely spinal. The pain is very localised.

Sounds like either a slipped or herniated disc, in which case you'd have trouble standing up at all, or most likely a simple muscle strain.

Rest for a few of days, avoid any strenuous exertion, bending or lifting and try using a heat pad or hot water bottle on it to relieve the pain.

BlackenedBiker
30th June 2009, 10:49
Thank you. I like to think so.

Joking right.

You are like a mine.

You are Anti-Personable

bogeyman
30th June 2009, 10:50
Empire Builders

Know-it-Alls

Know Nothings

Not job types but irritating personality traits

Those are pretty much the labels I mentally assign to people when I first go into an new, strange organisation and finding out who's who (along with 'evil bastard' and 'poison bitch').

PM-Junkie
30th June 2009, 10:56
Yes. Thanks. I might well give that a go. Just a bit concerned that there may be a more serious underlying problem.
Been through it myself - seen it, done it, bought the tshirt and have the scaffolding.

Things that helped me...

TENS - absolutely, but see a physio or a doc about where to place the pads because if you're not careful you could make it worse.

Acupuncture - was as skeptical as hell, but the physio recommended it and at the time I would have tried anything. It works, or at least it did with me (for pain relief). Since found out that some women use acupuncture for pain relief when they are in labour, so there must be something to it!

Swimming - I think everyone knows this one.

Pilates - absolutely brilliant, and in my view a must if you have back problems. If you can find someone who can give you 1:1 pilates instruction it will definitely help. And if you keep it up, your back will be less of an issue as you get older...but the bottom line is that nearly all of us have degenerative disc disease (dessication of the discs in the spine) because of the way we walk and sit, so pretty much everyone will have back problems...more so as we get older. The fitter we are and the less weight we carry, the less it degenerates.

....and the other one is to get the hell out of Britain. Apparently if you have any rheumatic-type problems (which back injuries often develop into), this is one of the worst climates in the world.

Me no doctor though...this is just based on my (painful) experiences.

bogeyman
30th June 2009, 11:01
Sounds like either a slipped or herniated disc, in which case you'd have trouble standing up at all, or most likely a simple muscle strain.

Rest for a few of days, avoid any strenuous exertion, bending or lifting and try using a heat pad or hot water bottle on it to relieve the pain.

Thanks for advice. Sounds sensible. Wife is nagging me to mow lawn. We have a gardener, but he's even more incapacitated than I am, currently, having fallen through a garage roof and gashed his leg, poor bugger.

It's like a jungle out there. Several local children are missing and there are sightings of unusually large stripey cats.

bogeyman
30th June 2009, 11:07
Been through it myself - seen it, done it, bought the tshirt and have the scaffolding.

Things that helped me...

TENS - absolutely, but see a physio or a doc about where to place the pads because if you're not careful you could make it worse.

Acupuncture - was as skeptical as hell, but the physio recommended it and at the time I would have tried anything. It works, or at least it did with me (for pain relief). Since found out that some women use acupuncture for pain relief when they are in labour, so there must be something to it!

Swimming - I think everyone knows this one.

Pilates - absolutely brilliant, and in my view a must if you have back problems. If you can find someone who can give you 1:1 pilates instruction it will definitely help. And if you keep it up, your back will be less of an issue as you get older...but the bottom line is that nearly all of us have degenerative disc disease (dessication of the discs in the spine) because of the way we walk and sit, so pretty much everyone will have back problems...more so as we get older. The fitter we are and the less weight we carry, the less it degenerates.

....and the other one is to get the hell out of Britain. Apparently if you have any rheumatic-type problems (which back injuries often develop into), this is one of the worst climates in the world.

Me no doctor though...this is just based on my (painful) experiences.

Thanks PMJ. All sounds like good advice.

As for getting the hell out of Britain, I'm spending over half my time in Vancouver. It's a contract but I'm hoping it will eventually turn into a permanent role. I love the place. Always feel much better when I'm there.

realityhack
30th June 2009, 11:14
a variety of occult materials in your urine - e.g., protein, glucose, blood etc.

Wow - I didn't know protein & sugar were evil. Evil meat, evil peanut butter. We're all doomed!

RichardCranium
30th June 2009, 11:23
Wow - I didn't know protein & sugar were evil. Evil meat, evil peanut butter. We're all doomed!'occult' <> 'evil'. 'Hidden' is nearer to its meaning which in this context, is pretty good.

Mich the Tester
30th June 2009, 11:26
Swimming - I think everyone knows this one.

Pilates - absolutely brilliant, and in my view a must if you have back problems. If you can find someone who can give you 1:1 pilates instruction it will definitely help. And if you keep it up, your back will be less of an issue as you get older...but the bottom line is that nearly all of us have degenerative disc disease (dessication of the discs in the spine) because of the way we walk and sit, so pretty much everyone will have back problems...more so as we get older. The fitter we are and the less weight we carry, the less it degenerates.

Good points. Many people with sedentary professions suffer from lower back pain. One common cause is that the iliopsoas become too short and tight. This explanation’s a bit technical, but bare with me; the iliopsoas are muscles which run from the lower spine to the femur, lifting the knee when you climb stairs or run. Sprinters and other sportspeople who lift their knees high during running have very well developed iliopsoas muscles as they have to pull the femur forward and upwards very quickly. However, running sportspeople also make a full stretch of the iliopsoas as the leg is extended behind the body; sedentary people and even fit people who don’t sprint or stretch don’t get this stretching movement and so the iliopsoas becomes short and tight, and pulls continually on the spine whenever they stand. That pulling compresses the lower vertebrae, thus causing pain, premature disc wear and severely aggravating pain from another possible nerve or skeletal condition.

Iliopsoas; http://www.exrx.net/Muscles/Iliopsoas.html

What can you do about it?

There are some exercises that have helped my father; an ex parachutist and top rugby player who had been told by doctors his back was knackered by the combination of impacts of landing after a jump and playing rugby. There´s me, fitness instructor, thinking hang on, he only developed this back pain AFTER he stopped playing rugby, and therefore after stopping with the kind of exercise that helps. It’s also helped Mrs Tester, seeing as she always thought her pain was caused by lifting people early in her nursing career; it was actually caused by her move to a more sedentary job in management.

Try these exercises;

http://muscul.az.free.fr/uk/stret/st10.htm

Better website, known as an authoritative source for fitness instructors;

http://www.exrx.net/Stretches/HipFlexors/LungingHipFlexor.html

http://www.exrx.net/Lists/ExList/HipsWt.html#anchor1938598

bogeyman
30th June 2009, 11:29
Great informative stuff Mich. Thanks.

sunnysan
30th June 2009, 11:38
Great informative stuff Mich. Thanks.

I started developing back problems AFTER i stopped running, a point I picked up on as well.

In its acute form, accupuncture works well. I was skeptical, but it really did loosen things up, and speed the healing process.

Long term, exercise is the best, I started jogging again every day and initially my back was extremely stiff and sore, but as I got fitter it went away and I have had nary a hint of a problem since then, as well things that used to knacker my back dont bother it anymore.

bogeyman
30th June 2009, 11:42
I started developing back problems AFTER i stopped running, a point I picked up on as well.

In its acute form, accupuncture works well. I was skeptical, but it really did loosen things up, and speed the healing process.

Long term, exercise is the best, I started jogging again every day and initially my back was extremely stiff and sore, but as I got fitter it went away and I have had nary a hint of a problem since then, as well things that used to knacker my back dont bother it anymore.

I've been worried about doing exercise simply because it hurts my back, and without knowing what the underlying cause it, I think it could make things worse.

Menelaus
30th June 2009, 11:44
'occult' <> 'evil'. 'Hidden' is nearer to its meaning which in this context, is pretty good.

Thanks.

Occult in medicoterm = stuff that shouldn't be there under normal circumstances. For example, if you're having a pee and you're busily pissing blood - that'd be occult blood.

Mich the Tester
30th June 2009, 11:51
I started developing back problems AFTER i stopped running, a point I picked up on as well.

In its acute form, accupuncture works well. I was skeptical, but it really did loosen things up, and speed the healing process.

Long term, exercise is the best, I started jogging again every day and initially my back was extremely stiff and sore, but as I got fitter it went away and I have had nary a hint of a problem since then, as well things that used to knacker my back dont bother it anymore.Good for you. If you have one or two hills (not necessarily big mountainlike hills) in your running route it's even better as your legs have to drive back behind your body to push you up the hill.

Having said that, pilates works well as an addition to other exercises as it helps develop balance; I started because I was training in a gym where a number of top judokas and Turkish wrestlers train; one of the wrestlers said it's useful for any contact sportsman and it really works. Those wrestlers have an amazing sense of balance; some of them actually train on a tightrope they've made in the gym, about 30cm above the ground; the sight of a 17 stone wrestler balancing on one leg on a tightrope is quite something. A month or so after I'd started building one pilates session a week into my training I noticed that I could break tackles more easily and in a way use the strength of the tacklers to keep me on my feet.

PM-Junkie
30th June 2009, 11:53
I've been worried about doing exercise simply because it hurts my back, and without knowing what the underlying cause it, I think it could make things worse.
I strongly recommend seeing a doc and getting a scan done, preferably private (if you have to pay for it the are about £600, but you'll get it done straight away rather then waiting a few months). But it would tell you exactly what is going on, and the doc would be able to tell you exactly what you can and can't to. Backs are risky things...take the hit and do it right now and you could be sorted for good. Get it wrong and...

Mich the Tester
30th June 2009, 11:54
I've been worried about doing exercise simply because it hurts my back, and without knowing what the underlying cause it, I think it could make things worse.Gentle stretching should be harmless if you don't force it to the pain barrier. Don't bounce when you stretch, but move to the point where you can feel the muscles pulling (not pain) and hold that position for 20 seconds; try to do this 5 times a week.

BlackenedBiker
30th June 2009, 11:55
I strongly recommend seeing a doc and getting a scan done, preferably private (if you have to pay for it the are about £600, but you'll get it done straight away rather then waiting a few months). But it would tell you exactly what is going on, and the doc would be able to tell you exactly what you can and can't to. Backs are risky things...take the hit and do it right now and you could be sorted for good. Get it wrong and...

and what, of FFS tell me please!!!!!!!!

PM-Junkie
30th June 2009, 12:00
...you might have back problems for the rest of your life. My doc told me a few harrowing tales to get me to behave myself. It's also quite scary when you find out how easy it is to screw a disc (sneezing...putting socks on in the morning!).

I did mine building a shed (I had multiple herniated discs), so at least I had the consolation of doing it while doing something worthwhile! If I had done it putting a pair of socks on I think I would have topped myself!!

Mich the Tester
30th June 2009, 12:02
I'm planning three more years of competitive rugby before I stop; will I become a decrepit old man afterwards?

bogeyman
30th June 2009, 12:02
Thanks all for the helpful advice.

I got a bit fired up about it, and called the Head of Practice at local clinic and she has fixed an appointment at the John Radcliffe infirmary in Oxford for me to have a scan next week.

Seems you need to shout and complain a lot before you get anything done on the NHS.

Menelaus
30th June 2009, 12:03
Interestingly, despite being <40, I'm beginning to pick up a little sciatica.

Something of a concern bending down to put my shoes on in the morning to have pain like someone's shot me :eek

Menelaus
30th June 2009, 12:04
I'm planning three more years of competitive rugby before I stop; will I become a decrepit old man afterwards?

:spel what do you mean afterwards? :D

Mich the Tester
30th June 2009, 12:04
Interestingly, despite being <40, I'm beginning to pick up a little sciatica.

Something of a concern bending down to put my shoes on in the morning to have pain like someone's shot me :eekWhat did you do in the army?

BlackenedBiker
30th June 2009, 12:05
What did you do in the army?


Put his shoes on more easily by the sounds of it

PM-Junkie
30th June 2009, 12:06
I'm planning three more years of competitive rugby before I stop; will I become a decrepit old man afterwards?
Nope - you'll just find that you'll watch the odd game, and when you do you'll start every sentence with "in my day....." :wink

Menelaus
30th June 2009, 12:12
What did you do in the army?

I was a CMT (medico-type).

Cyberman
30th June 2009, 12:16
I've had a lot of back pain since a bad slip and fall at my gym a year ago. One of the best things I did was to invest in a Vulcan Back Support. I wear it while playing squash which otherwise I would certainly not be able to play, and also if doing any major lifting. I am actually wearing it now after a reaction from a game last night, and it takes away all of the pain. No need for drugs!!

Take it from me, resting too much is bad for the back, but over-exertion is also bad without using a support. I find that if I use the paddle machines in the gym it improves my back no end, and I use them for an hour, three or four times a week without a support. :happy

Mich the Tester
30th June 2009, 12:17
I was a CMT (medico-type).Lots of physical hard work or not?

Mich the Tester
30th June 2009, 12:19
Nope - you'll just find that you'll watch the odd game, and when you do you'll start every sentence with "in my day....." :winkI have sworn an oath that I shall not become one of those know-it-all old geezers who stands on the side of the pitch moaning about every tactical decision or dropped ball; people who know better should coach or get involved in the club in some other useful way.

Menelaus
30th June 2009, 12:21
Lots of physical hard work or not?

A fair bit*, why'd you ask?

* obviously not as much as an infanteer or similar however.

PM-Junkie
30th June 2009, 12:21
I have sworn an oath that I shall not become one of those know-it-all old geezers who stands on the side of the pitch moaning about every tactical decision or dropped ball; people who know better should coach or get involved in the club in some other useful way.
I think it's kind of a legal thing...once you give up a game you have to take the p*** out of people still playing it, and say how much better the game was in your day. It's in the rules.

There will come a day when you find yourself doing it. Trust me. ;)

Menelaus
30th June 2009, 12:22
I think it's kind of a legal thing...once you give up a game you have to take the p*** out of people still playing it, and say how much better the game was in your day. It's in the rules.

There will come a day when you find yourself doing it. Trust me. ;)

Hell, I do - and I still play albeit occasionally.

Mich the Tester
30th June 2009, 12:27
A fair bit*, why'd you ask?

Just interest; I'm going to be doing another trainers course shortly because it seems there are a lot of people who've moved from phyical jobs to sedentary jobs or have stopped with sports and are suffering various physical problems after they've become more sedentary; I'll need to write a big essay citing evidence of this kind of thing to get my certificates for giving specialised training for lower back problems. If I can get that, Plan B can really take off as there's a huge market for this kind of thing; many physios in NL are starting to send patients on to specialised fitness trainers for aftercare; it´s comparatively well paid work and has the added advantage that you're paid by the insurers instead of having to chase private individuals for cash.

Menelaus
30th June 2009, 12:29
Just interest; I'm going to be doing another trainers course shortly because it seems there are a lot of people who've moved from phyical jobs to sedentary jobs or have stopped with sports and are suffering various physical problems after they've become more sedentary; I'll need to write a big essay citing evidence of this kind of thing to get my certificates for giving specialised training for lower back problems. If I can get that, Plan B can really take off as there's a huge market for this kind of thing; many physios in NL are starting to send patients on to specialised fitness trainers for aftercare; it´s comparatively well paid work and has the added advantage that you're paid by the insurers instead of having to chase private individuals for cash.

No problem: I can probably put you in touch with some orthopods to get some research if it'd help?

Mich the Tester
30th June 2009, 12:31
No problem: I can probably put you in touch with some orthopods to get some research if it'd help?
Could be very useful; I'll be starting the course in the autumn so I might PM you before then.

Menelaus
30th June 2009, 12:40
Could be very useful; I'll be starting the course in the autumn so I might PM you before then.

Feel free - happy to help.

Drewster
30th June 2009, 13:48
Nope - you'll just find that you'll watch the odd game, and when you do you'll start every sentence with "in my day....." :wink

Where I come from the Old Geezers/ex-Players were always called the: "WhenWees"

Isn't it standard?

Mich the Tester
30th June 2009, 13:52
Where I come from the Old Geezers/ex-Players were always called the: "WhenWees"

Isn't it standard?Perhaps, but I find it annoying nonetheless. Even worse; fatty Guscott on the telly spouting his endless tactical wisdom while forgetting that players on the field don't have the benefit of a comfy chair in the grandstand and 20 minutes time to spend using a light pen to draw lines showing where the gaps in the defence are.

Drewster
30th June 2009, 13:54
Perhaps, but I find it annoying nonetheless. Even worse; fatty Guscott on the telly spouting his endless tactical wisdom while forgetting that players on the field don't have the benefit of a comfy chair in the grandstand and 20 minutes time to spend using a light pen to draw lines showing where the gaps in the defence are.

Certainly don't disagree with you there.... When we played we got nothing but respect from..... Oh dear!

Mich the Tester
30th June 2009, 13:57
Certainly don't disagree with you there.... When we played we got nothing but respect from..... Oh dear!I believe the Kiwis' favourite wise old git is Sean Fitzpatrick. Very popular chap apparently not.