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View Full Version : DOOM - Britain faces 100,000 swine flu cases a day



ace00
2nd July 2009, 12:37
More than 100,000 swine flu cases could be diagnosed every day by the end of next month, the Health Secretary has warned.

Britain has moved past the stage of containing the swine flu outbreak and into the “treatment phase”, Andy Burnham told the House of Commons.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/health/article6623554.ece

DiscoStu
2nd July 2009, 12:47
More than 100,000 swine flu cases could be diagnosed every day by the end of next month, the Health Secretary has warned.

Britain has moved past the stage of containing the swine flu outbreak and into the “treatment phase”, Andy Burnham told the House of Commons.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/health/article6623554.ece

Is it really doom-worthy when it's no more harmful than normal flu?

Menelaus
2nd July 2009, 12:49
Right. Surveillance on. What are they trying to slip out whilst this smoke's up?

minestrone
2nd July 2009, 12:51
As long as I get it after I move house and finish this gig.

Andy2
2nd July 2009, 13:08
As long as they don't run out of Tamiflu

DimPrawn
2nd July 2009, 13:12
I'm sure cyberman would have had something to say, but I retired that sockpuppet due to popular demand.

Menelaus
2nd July 2009, 13:15
As long as they don't run out of Tamiflu

Evolution - H1N1 will eventually adapt to become tamiflu-resistant.

Moscow Mule
2nd July 2009, 13:21
As long as they don't run out of Tamiflu

You'll only get Tamiflu if you're young, old or sick with something else. Normal healthy folks won't get it.

Alf W
2nd July 2009, 13:36
Is it really doom-worthy when it's no more harmful than normal flu?

Economic impact of all those people off sick or looking after sick dependents?

Could be time to buy some shares in KimberleyClark.

DimPrawn
2nd July 2009, 13:42
Is it really doom-worthy when it's no more harmful than normal flu?

What makes it dangerous is it appears to be easily transmitted and humans have little or no immunity.

Now at present it is pretty mild, but if it mutates and the mortality rate goes up, we're looking at a lot of dead bodies.

The very young, elderly, those with underlying medical problems add up to a lot of people.

Menelaus
2nd July 2009, 13:44
What makes it dangerous is it appears to be easily transmitted and humans have little or no immunity.

Now at present it is pretty mild, but if it mutates and the mortality rate goes up, we're looking at a lot of dead bodies.

The very young, elderly, those with underlying medical problems add up to a lot of people.

For the young, I'd imagine that breast-feeding will become an absolute requirement. None of this "it hurts, I want to feed by bottle" stuff.

For the old - sorry, not a hell of a lot we can do, you're going to slowly drown in your own lung secretions.

For the underlyingly ill - see above.

At least from a pensions perspective it solves the mortality problem!

/wanders off whistling "Always Look On The Bright Side of Life"

d000hg
2nd July 2009, 13:49
Is it really doom-worthy when it's no more harmful than normal flu?Do we get 100k people catching regular flu a day in the middle of summer?

DimPrawn
2nd July 2009, 13:51
Do we get 100k people catching regular flu a day in the middle of summer?

Exactly. Everyone is going to get this. And if it combines with a nasty flu variant, we won't be worrying about house prices.

Well I will be, but that's beside the point.

d000hg
2nd July 2009, 13:55
I don't go outside much since I work from home. Wonder if I can avoid it by staying in...

Menelaus
2nd July 2009, 13:56
I don't go outside much since I work from home. Wonder if I can avoid it by staying in...

Only if you have no visitors.

Doomed!

Cyberman
2nd July 2009, 13:59
It's a good thing. The more people that get this early version, then the more that will have immunity if the deadly variant arrives at winter-time. A few dead now is a risk worth taking to ensure fewer dead in the future, unless we do really want that cure for unemployment. :happy

PM-Junkie
2nd July 2009, 14:03
um....pardon my ignorance, but since when did people pay any credence to what a health secretary said??

Bird flu anyone?
CJD anyone??

Here's an interesting factoid for you to mull over. Tamiflu has a shelf life of 3 years. The world and his dog stocked up on tamiflu for the bird flu scare. That was three years ago so countries have had to restock by buying another few million doses of it to "cope" with piggy flu.

Funny ol' coincidence that, isn't it?

ferret
2nd July 2009, 14:10
Evolution - H1N1 will eventually adapt to become tamiflu-resistant.

I think I read that it is already showing resistance to Tamiflu. Having three and half year old and year old daughters it is quite worrying...

Menelaus
2nd July 2009, 14:13
I think I read that it is already showing resistance to Tamiflu. Having three and half year old and year old daughters it is quite worrying...

Indeed. I'm sorry to hear that, and I don't know the first thing about treatment protocols for swine flu, other than to take care when sneezing.

RichardCranium
2nd July 2009, 15:35
Ha, ha! All the working contractors will get resistant 'flu and die, and us benched ones will get their gigs! :banana:




:emb Did I say that out loud?

Menelaus
2nd July 2009, 15:40
Ha, ha! All the working contractors will get resistant 'flu and die, and us benched ones will get their gigs! :banana:




:emb Did I say that out loud?

You're a sick individual.

It's one of the things I like about you :eek

sunnysan
2nd July 2009, 15:42
Now at present it is pretty mild, but if it mutates and the mortality rate goes up, we're looking at a lot of dead bodies.

IANAD but as far as I can tell, the risk of mutation into a lethal strain exists with any flu virus. At present it is pretty mild. A completely different strain of flu could mutate into something deadly.

We dont know and from where I am stting its really does not seem more of a risk than usual. I havent really found any explanation which justifies any massive panic on my part, owing to the fact that nobody seems to have explained why it is so much more lethal than other strains of flu

PM-Junkie
2nd July 2009, 15:43
Ha, ha! All the working contractors will get resistant 'flu and die, and us benched ones will get their gigs! :banana:




:emb Did I say that out loud?
...or all of those on the bench will catch it and die, leaving those in work to raise their rates because they have suddenly become indispensable ;)

RichardCranium
2nd July 2009, 16:15
...or all of those on the bench will catch it and die, leaving those in work to raise their rates because they have suddenly become indispensable ;)One of the perks of being on the bench is not getting sniffles off the permies.

It causes shedloads of mental health issues, but physically us benchees are generally germ-free.

Zippy
2nd July 2009, 16:20
One of the perks of being on the bench is not getting sniffles off the permies.

It causes shedloads of mental health issues, but physically us benchees are generally germ-free.

Or smugness poisoning off the working contractors.

Pass the Special Brew would you?

MrMark
2nd July 2009, 16:55
...or all of those on the bench will catch it and die, leaving those in work to raise their rates because they have suddenly become indispensable ;)

Either way, we'll be able to demand reasonable "market rates" again. I doubt any of us will forget the companies who imposed "from this week your contract is being re-written - take a 20% cut or walk" . These things can work both ways

MrMark
2nd July 2009, 16:57
It's a good thing. The more people that get this early version, then the more that will have immunity if the deadly variant arrives at winter-time. A few dead now is a risk worth taking to ensure fewer dead in the future, unless we do really want that cure for unemployment. :happy

I have to say I agree with Cyberman. Yikes! Does that mean I've already caught the flu???:eek

Lambros
2nd July 2009, 19:01
So why are GP's going to diagnose swine flu over the phone??

Is testing so woefully inaccurate and is the spread of an epidemic better monitored by clinical diagnosis.

scotspine
2nd July 2009, 19:06
ah, good ol' lambo. welcome back. you've been away some time. if anyone ever feels the lack of a conspiracy... :tongue

ThomasSoerensen
2nd July 2009, 19:11
Evolution - H1N1 will eventually adapt to become tamiflu-resistant.

That has already happened in at least 1 case in Denmark.

Lambros
2nd July 2009, 19:31
ah, good ol' lambo. welcome back. you've been away some time. if anyone ever feels the lack of a conspiracy... :tongue


As you say scotspine but testing should be used to verify clinical diagnosis.

Otherwise how will we know if swine flu is a pandemic.

scotspine
2nd July 2009, 20:06
that is true i guess but don't you think that the workload of testing could overload the hs, perhaps even to the point that results would so postdate the events as to be, to all intents and purposes, useless?


edit: besides, i thought the fact of a pandemic had already been established?

Lambros
2nd July 2009, 21:36
that is true i guess but don't you think that the workload of testing could overload the hs, perhaps even to the point that results would so postdate the events as to be, to all intents and purposes, useless?


edit: besides, i thought the fact of a pandemic had already been established?


So are you saying that testing is woefully inaccurate and the spread of an epidemic is better monitored by clinical diagnosis?

Andy2
3rd July 2009, 08:36
look at the bright side
Contractor rates will increase because of too many dead contractors