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sunnysan
16th September 2009, 14:05
Tulip,

Little barstewards infesting my flat.

Woke up at 4h30 to find one tucking into my organic apples!

Any tips on how to get rid of them, my requirements are non-toxic as I have a dog and want to limit collateral damage, but humane dispatching of said pestilence is an optional requirement.

Sunny "mouse sh i te between my toes" san

Spacecadet
16th September 2009, 14:08
swap the dog for a cat

DimPrawn
16th September 2009, 14:10
Move from a vermin infested bedsit to a nice large detached house set in a couple of acres.

HTH

scooterscot
16th September 2009, 14:29
We got one of those electronic boxes that plugs into the wall - lets out a sounds beyond the human range - the little folk cannot stand it. Got it from B&Q. Although I found the best measure was to stuff wire wool in any openings along the wall or under the fireplace and of course hover every 5 minutes.

We're not messy by any means and keep the place spick and span, however the hotels a few doors away just throw all their crap on the street and attract all the wee beasties

Liability
16th September 2009, 14:29
Yep

these http://www.primrose-london.co.uk/mouse-glue-traps-p-782.html

might be a little sick if you catch them on it fresh as they start to bleed as they pull there own legs off and what not - but then dump them in a bucket for 30 seconds and done deal. Little bastards

minestrone
16th September 2009, 14:32
The only think that will work is a cat.

My mate lives on a farm with 2 cats and 2 big german pointers. A cat will run in with a mouse and drop it in front of the dogs and the fastest one to get to it will eat it whole.

Clippy
16th September 2009, 14:33
Had a similar problem a few years ago caused by the kitchen refurbishment creating a small (unknown) void by some pipes which allowed the vermin to come up from under the floorboards.

Ideally you need to find the source of where they are coming from and seal it.

In the meantime, buy a humane mousetrap and place a small amount of chocolate in there - I found Bounty to be particularly popular.

Moscow Mule
16th September 2009, 14:38
Move from a vermin infested bedsit to a nice large detached house set in a couple of acres.

HTH

Surely this will result in more mice?

Evil Hangover
16th September 2009, 14:42
I had mice in a flat I lived in in Wapping once. (The whole area is infested due to its proximity to the Thames)

I called Rentokil round (who charge the earth) and they laid a number of baiting boxes. These are plastic boxes with a hole through which the mice is supposed to enter. They're filled with some industrial strenght poison that, once consumed, leads to internal bleeding and death. (Not sure the mice were fooled by these however)

The other bit of advice they offered was to cut off their food supply, as the only reason these blighters surface is to stuff their faces.

So, make sure you hide / remove any fruit, and clean up as much as possible. If they start breeding you're f*****.

Agree with closing the gaps, but they can squeeze through a hole the size of a pencil.

Pogle
16th September 2009, 15:20
I grew up in a house infested with mice - I'm rather fond of them.

Mind you I've never had a problem with them as an adult - I put it down to always having cats

Board Game Geek
16th September 2009, 15:31
We used to get rats and mice in the old cottage. Rats in the outbuildings on the estate and mice scampering in the walls. Oh, and the blimming house sparrows used to tear strips of thatch off the roof to make nests.

Nothing a .22 air rifle and an eager young lad couldn't solve however.

JoJoGabor
16th September 2009, 15:39
We had a new sink fitted last week and since then I have heard a rat under the kitchen sink. I know its a rat as its too big for a mouce. this thing was causing the doors to rattle as it moved around. Filled in a gap that was uncovered in the cupboard but now it jsut scratches around between the cupboard and the floorboards. You can hear it breathing.

Its not too different to having a pet really! :eek

singhr
16th September 2009, 15:49
I recommend 'Little Nipper'. You can get em in multi-packs at Robert Dyas etc.

use a bit of cheese, bread or chocolate to get them to put their head on the proverbial chopping block.

be careful when you nip downstairs for a midnight snack in the dark though....

heard a girl on tube the other night discussing some electric device that you plug into wall socket which scares em away.....wot into another room like?

Ruse
16th September 2009, 15:56
heard a girl on tube the other night discussing some electric device that you plug into wall socket which scares em away.....wot into another room like?

Does it work on kids ? It'd save me a lot of cash if they moved out....

Zippy
16th September 2009, 16:05
Does it work on kids ? It'd save me a lot of cash if they moved out....

Try one of these (http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A31699146)

Ruse
16th September 2009, 16:31
Try one of these (http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A31699146)

Ah yes good thinking, now I wonder if it works on Under 10's ;)

Sysman
16th September 2009, 16:35
Tulip,

Little barstewards infesting my flat.

Woke up at 4h30 to find one tucking into my organic apples!

Any tips on how to get rid of them, my requirements are non-toxic as I have a dog and want to limit collateral damage, but humane dispatching of said pestilence is an optional requirement.

Sunny "mouse sh i te between my toes" san

If you get really infested with the blighters all thoughts of humane go out of the window.

I used to have a house surrounded by fields and they'd invade every time the grass was cut and when it got cold. The Labrador had a good go at them, until the day when she ate one which had been poisoned (next door put poison down as they didn't have any pets themselves). Poor dog was extremely ill and puke/bile and diarrhoea all over the kitchen floor, so never went after mice again.

I sealed up various holes to next door under the floorboards and laid mousetraps on the kitchen work surfaces. The main problem was the sacks of dog food; they'd eat holes in the bottom of the sack so when you lifted it out there were biscuits all over the floor. I ended up getting a large plastic tub with a tight fitting lid for that.

On getting through small holes:- I had a gas man come to fit a new meter and as he lifted the old one out we saw a mouse which disappeared before our eyes. It somehow fitted through the corner of the cupboard where to the naked eye there was no gap. We both thought we'd being seeing things.

Zippy
16th September 2009, 16:37
Ah yes good thinking, now I wonder if it works on Under 10's ;)

Nah. You need one of these (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheep_dog) ;)

threaded
16th September 2009, 17:09
I live on a farm and since the crop was brought in a few days ago it's like the dogs and cats are off their food...

hyperD
16th September 2009, 17:46
Buy two cats.

One for catching mice. The other for the balti.

SizeZero
16th September 2009, 17:56
Electronic devices = don't work. They just move to a different area in the house. If you see one, you've got ten: if you see ten, you've got a hundred, etc

Get the council in: most councils will clear mice and rats for free as it's a public health risk - and they have the best poison for the situation. If they charge, it's likely to be under fifty quid (unlike the private companies.)

norrahe
16th September 2009, 18:21
get a cat.

If you're going to use bait traps do not put cheese in it, Mice do not like cheese, chocolate works better.

OwlHoot
16th September 2009, 18:36
.. So, make sure you hide / remove any fruit, and clean up as much as possible. If they start breeding you're f*****. ..

They don't "start" breeding - they're always breeding - If you see one mouse it's almost certain there are a dozen or more in the vicinity.

edit: As SizeZero already pointed out

OwlHoot
16th September 2009, 18:46
To those whose pets snack on mice, it's worth pointing out that mice usually host a nasty parasitic worm and if this infects a larger animal it can cause all kinds of serious damage including blindness.

I don't recall the name(s), but possibly one of these species is described here (http://human-infections.suite101.com/article.cfm/capillaria_spp_tiny_worms).

norrahe
16th September 2009, 19:05
To those whose pets snack on mice, it's worth pointing out that mice usually host a nasty parasitic worm and if this infects a larger animal it can cause all kinds of serious damage including blindness.

I don't recall the name(s), but possibly one of these species is described here (http://human-infections.suite101.com/article.cfm/capillaria_spp_tiny_worms).

to combat that make sure you use a decent wormer once a month on your cat/dog stronghold notmally does the trick

Alf W
16th September 2009, 19:10
Well we've got two cats and my experience is that cats bring mice into the house not the other way round.

We've also had birds, small rabbits, a trout, a rib-eye steak, a mole, slow worms and a squirrel.

norrahe
16th September 2009, 19:51
Well we've got two cats and my experience is that cats bring mice into the house not the other way round.

We've also had birds, small rabbits, a trout, a rib-eye steak, a mole, slow worms and a squirrel.

I'll raise your menagerie and add some bread rolls and frogs

TinTrump
17th September 2009, 06:22
I recommend 'Little Nipper'. You can get em in multi-packs at Robert Dyas etc.
I used 1 of these a few years back when we had a mouse appear in the kitchen of a shared house. Used a mix of oats & honey and caught 3 or 4 adults over week, although 1 wasn't a clean kill and I had to use a length of wood to finish it off, so you have to be prepared for that sort of eventuality. What made me laugh was that another housemate, in the TA, couldn't bring himself to do the deed. :laugh Dead tough these weekend warriors.

Anyhow, I digress Ronnie Corbet style.

I reset the trap and nothing for a couple of days. Then, returning from work one day, I found that 3 baby mice had ventured out, presumably starving with all the adults dead, and had all been killed by the trap in 1 fell swoop. That was kind of sad.

The Lone Gunman
17th September 2009, 06:49
If you get someone in to poison them or poison them yourself then be prepared for a foul smelling house for a while.
The poisoned animal will be in your wall or under your floor when it dies. There is a very distinctive smell to rotting rodent.

Paddy
17th September 2009, 08:23
You need to block all holes up with cement. You may find entry points around water and waste pipes. Cat is the best option as proved for thousands of years. If no cat then get a humane trap from B&Q. Cheap traps don't work.

singhr
17th September 2009, 09:02
we did use a trap that caught em without killing but you end up having to wash the tulip out of it each time they get in there. plus you have to deal with live rodent as you are trying to rush out of house in morning with kids wanting to play with it. We've had at least 50 over years using the little nippers but they do get a bit bloody and wake you up as little chappie is thrashing around the kitchen in the middle of the night. makes their eyes pop out too if it catches em in middle of skull.

Paddy
17th September 2009, 11:05
To get rid of the mouse once caught you need:

One metre of scaffold.
One scaffold end piece.
15mm drill
12v battery
One HT coil
One HT lead
One spark plug
1 cc of petroleum.

Correctly assembled the mouse can be launched (live) to a distance several blocks away.

BA to the Stars
17th September 2009, 20:32
Tulip,

Little barstewards infesting my flat.

Woke up at 4h30 to find one tucking into my organic apples!

Any tips on how to get rid of them, my requirements are non-toxic as I have a dog and want to limit collateral damage, but humane dispatching of said pestilence is an optional requirement.

Sunny "mouse sh i te between my toes" san

Are you related to Wilmslow?

The Lone Gunman
17th September 2009, 21:05
To get rid of the mouse once caught you need:

One metre of scaffold.
One scaffold end piece.
15mm drill
12v battery
One HT coil
One HT lead
One spark plug
1 cc of petroleum.

Correctly assembled the mouse can be launched (live) to a distance several blocks away.I like the sound of this but can not see how to fire it without the rodent becoming toast.

RichardCranium
18th September 2009, 07:52
I like the sound of this but can not see how to fire it without the rodent becoming toast.Mouses can survive more g-forces than we can. You can drop a mouse down a mine shaft and it will survive. So firing one from a petrol-fuelled cannon and have it survive might well be plausible.

The Lone Gunman
18th September 2009, 08:01
Mouses can survive more g-forces than we can. You can drop a mouse down a mine shaft and it will survive. So firing one from a petrol-fuelled cannon and have it survive might well be plausible.I get that bit but there is no mention of a container or barrier in the original spec to protect the mouse from the petrol explosion. It will be a crisp before it leaves the tube. Imagine the nighbours cats surprise when a ready cooked meal lands on its doorstep.

Sysman
18th September 2009, 10:53
I get that bit but there is no mention of a container or barrier in the original spec to protect the mouse from the petrol explosion. It will be a crisp before it leaves the tube. Imagine the nighbours cats surprise when a ready cooked meal lands on its doorstep.

Flied mice!

What about wadding such as used in a musket?