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View Full Version : How much does a train from Cornwall to Scotland cost?



DimPrawn
3rd November 2009, 21:03
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8340561.stm

Bargain.

MaryPoppins
3rd November 2009, 21:06
Bargain indeed. Plus the added bonus that 'Cross Country Trains, which sells the ticket, said an advance fare was available for £561'

Fark me, that's ridiculous.

:sick

AtW
3rd November 2009, 21:09
I hope that ticket is not on the trains shown on BBC photo:

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/45508000/jpg/_45508973_006904798-1.jpg

:sick

P.S. Planning to spend around £1000 to travel by train from Birmingham to Moscow and back later this year...

pzz76077
3rd November 2009, 21:10
That is a bit steep, hiring a car would be in the region of 300, plane from Bristol (Sleasyjet) 100. Not that either would beat sitting in the 1st class lounge of a train drinking G&T all the way. Cant remember if they give out free complimentary drinks on trains in the UK these days though.

PZZ

Zippy
3rd November 2009, 21:11
Piss taking of the highest order.
For that kind of money you could get a chauffeured limo to the nearest airport, a plane ticket and luxury transport at the other end. And sexual services (probably).

RichardCranium
3rd November 2009, 21:16
Anybody got any idea of how much a helicopter taxi would be (plus taxis at either end)?

AtW
3rd November 2009, 21:17
Anybody got any idea of how much a helicopter taxi would be (plus taxis at either end)?

Only £20,000.

HTH

threaded

Zippy
3rd November 2009, 21:19
Only £20,000.

HTH

threaded

You can afford it though ;)

DimPrawn
3rd November 2009, 21:21
Anybody got any idea of how much a helicopter taxi would be (plus taxis at either end)?

If 3 or 4 of you were making the journey a private helicopter taxi would probably cost less.

d000hg
3rd November 2009, 21:25
You should be able to get a train from one end of the country to the other for £100. The fuel must be relatively cheap, that's the whole point of public transport.

centurian
3rd November 2009, 21:33
Not that either would beat sitting in the 1st class lounge of a train drinking G&T all the way.

Ah, but only 1 of the 3 trains required for the journey actually had 1st class carriages - although that 1 did represent the majority of the journey

Spacecadet
3rd November 2009, 21:40
Ah, but only 1 of the 3 trains required for the journey actually had 1st class carriages - although that 1 did represent the majority of the journey

What happens in the other two? do you sit on the drivers lap?

pzz76077
3rd November 2009, 21:50
I sure you could get 4 ICT's to carry you all the way in one of those little chair things and get their wives/sisters to do the sexual favors that someone mentioned earlier for that kind of money......and still have change for a bag of chips along the way


PZZ

centurian
3rd November 2009, 22:06
What happens in the other two? do you sit on the drivers lap?

Sit in standard class - even though you hold a first class ticket.

pzz76077
3rd November 2009, 22:10
Sit in standard class - even though you hold a first class ticket.

Some windup Shirley??
Is that why the ticket only cost a grand??

PZZ

AtW
3rd November 2009, 22:23
Some windup Shirley?? Is that why the ticket only cost a grand??

That's no wind up mate - those who had non-1st-class tickets would have to be pushing train right up to Scotland...

Spacecadet
3rd November 2009, 22:55
Sit in standard class - even though you hold a first class ticket.

Can you demand that one of the scottish peasants gives up their seat for you if it is busy?

scotspine
3rd November 2009, 23:27
Can you demand that one of the scottish peasants gives up their seat for you if it is busy?

you could of course try to demand spaceboy, but i feel you'd not get too far!

darmstadt
4th November 2009, 09:10
You should be able to get a train from one end of the country to the other for £100. The fuel must be relatively cheap, that's the whole point of public transport.

No such thing as public transport anymore, more like private transport for the public

TimberWolf
4th November 2009, 09:30
They are taking people for a ride.

DimPrawn
4th November 2009, 09:31
They are taking people for a ride.

I think you are on the right track there.

gingerjedi
4th November 2009, 09:37
I didn't know the Orient Express went to Scotland?

TimberWolf
4th November 2009, 09:39
P.S. Planning to spend around £1000 to travel by train from Birmingham to Moscow and back later this year...

Any idea how much of that fare is subsided by the various countries you travel through?

BoredBloke
4th November 2009, 09:40
Bargain indeed. Plus the added bonus that 'Cross Country Trains, which sells the ticket, said an advance fare was available for £561'

Fark me, that's ridiculous.

:sick

I love that comment from them though as though 561 is a reasonable amount to pay! You could fly to somewhere good for that rather than sit of a series of skanky trains rumbling over victorian tracks which may or may not get you to your desired destination.

TimberWolf
4th November 2009, 09:41
I love that comment from them though as though 561 is a reasonable amount to pay! You could fly to somewhere good for that rather than sit of a series of skanky trains rumbling over victorian tracks which may or may not get you to your desired destination.

The article also mentioned the punter, I mean passenger, may not even get a seat for the whole journey.

Pondlife
4th November 2009, 09:44
I've had many a flight to the US and South America for less than that.

It's just taking the p1ss IMHO.

My regular flights to the mainland are always less than £561 often even for business class.

AtW
4th November 2009, 10:08
Any idea how much of that fare is subsided by the various countries you travel through?

:rollin:

Subsidised?

Trains are the cheapest most efficient means of transport (for high volumes at least), it costs blooming £120 to get to London from Brum at peak time (flexible ticket), are you going to tell me that UK Railways are not subsidised? They sure are, but also they are terribly run from commercial point of view, partly due to Govt's involvement.

TimberWolf
4th November 2009, 10:14
:rollin:

Subsidised?

Trains are the cheapest most efficient means of transport (for high volumes at least), it costs blooming £120 to get to London from Brum at peak time (flexible ticket), are you going to tell me that UK Railways are not subsidised? They sure are, but also they are terribly run from commercial point of view, partly due to Govt's involvement.

No, but I'm wondering if, when all costs of railway transport are taken into account (minus subsidies) whether travel by rail isn't as efficient as might be thought when looking at fuel used. Same kind of argument applied to travel by ship. Even though ships are, apparently, highly efficient in terms of energy used per distance, they travel so slow that capital costs aren't efficiently regained, except for really bulky items. Whereas air travel capital costs may be lower and more quickly recouped.

Spacecadet
4th November 2009, 10:16
:rollin:

Subsidised?

Trains are the cheapest most efficient means of transport (for high volumes at least), it costs blooming £120 to get to London from Brum at peak time (flexible ticket), are you going to tell me that UK Railways are not subsidised? They sure are, but also they are terribly run from commercial point of view, partly due to Govt's involvement.

Amsterdam to Brussels will cost you €44 for the return trip

AtW
4th November 2009, 10:42
No, but I'm wondering if, when all costs of railway transport are taken into account (minus subsidies) whether travel by rail isn't as efficient as might be thought when looking at fuel used. Same kind of argument applied to travel by ship. Even though ships are, apparently, highly efficient in terms of energy used per distance, they travel so slow that capital costs aren't efficiently regained, except for really bulky items. Whereas air travel capital costs may be lower and more quickly recouped.

I can't be arsed argueing too much about it, so I just went to USA Amtrak and checked how much it costs to get from New York to Los Angeles - top ticket was $303 return. Distance: about 3,000 miles which is 5,000 km.

I doubt they give any subsidies to trains in USA.

pzz76077
4th November 2009, 10:47
My monthly ticket here costs me 49.5 euros a month to travel on any bus, tram, metro or local train.

To go by train from Vienna to Venice, off peak, 49 Euros each way.

Venice to South of France, 149 each way.

The UK has gone mad. Wasnt it Prescotts job to sort out public transport??
What happened to him??

PZZ

DiscoStu
4th November 2009, 10:48
My monthly ticket here costs me 49.5 euros a month to travel on any bus, tram, metro or local train.

To go by train from Vienna to Venice, off peak, 49 Euros each way.

Venice to South of France, 149 each way.

The UK has gone mad. Wasnt it Prescotts job to sort out public transport??
What happened to him??

PZZ

After Blair left office he went to work for Ginsters as chief taster and hasn't been heard from since.

chef
4th November 2009, 10:54
choofing hell that would get me stoked up if I had to pay that

AtW
4th November 2009, 10:56
Would HMRC be ok if you put that ticket through expenses? :eyes

Andy2
4th November 2009, 11:06
At that price I would expect a gold bar free with the ticket

Mich the Tester
4th November 2009, 11:15
Amsterdam to Brussels will cost you €44 for the return tripWith rail companies run by the Dutch and Belgian governments.

The Dutch, German, French and Swiss railways all have a good reputation, are all quite affordable and they're all run by state owned businesses. The British railways have been shite for a long time, but are now very expensive too.

Railways that are run by the British government tend to be an expensive mess. That doesn´t mean other governments are incapable of running railways.

scooterscot
4th November 2009, 11:42
I didn't know the Orient Express went to Scotland?

It does http://www.luxury-trains.co.uk/royal-scotsman.htm

scooterscot
4th November 2009, 11:46
The whole argument 'well sir if you bought your ticket in advance' really gets my feckles up..

A train service should support business not scare it away, in most if not all European countries I've been to you can walk up to the station buy the ticket at fraction of the cost had you walked into a station in the UK for the same distance.

Nationalise the network - please..

Spacecadet
4th November 2009, 11:50
Nationalise the network - please..

Would it be possible to get a country who's government knows what they're doing to nationalise our railways for us?

alreadypacked
4th November 2009, 11:55
Nationalise the network - please..

We could outsource it to the Swiss :nerd

scooterscot
4th November 2009, 12:04
We could outsource it to the Swiss :nerd


Also it must be a non-profit organisation.

scotspine
4th November 2009, 12:11
Also it must be a non-profit organisation.

sounds a bit like mine sometimes

Paddy
4th November 2009, 13:41
My monthly ticket here costs me 49.5 euros a month to travel on any bus, tram, metro or local train.

To go by train from Vienna to Venice, off peak, 49 Euros each way.

Venice to South of France, 149 each way.

The UK has gone mad. Wasnt it Prescotts job to sort out public transport??
What happened to him??

PZZ

Yes, in 1997, Presscott made a pledge that in five years the UK will have an iintegrated transport system being the envy of Europe. I think I should write as ask he when it will be ready.

Mich the Tester
4th November 2009, 13:55
Yes, in 1997, Presscott made a pledge that in five years the UK will have an iintegrated transport system being the envy of Europe. I think I should write as ask he when it will be ready.
He 'invested' all the money in improving the freight infrastructure for meat pie deliveries.

Spacecadet
4th November 2009, 13:56
He 'invested' all the money in improving the freight infrastructure for meat pie deliveries.

And to the Jaguar factories!

BoredBloke
4th November 2009, 14:10
We could outsource it to the Swiss :nerd

One of the few things I have found good about Switzerland is their public transport. When walking through the baggage hall in the airport there are a couple of machines that dish out free travel tickets for Geneva. Ok the cost normally is 3 francs, but here you get it for free. Now compare that with what you get on arrival at a UK airport.

So if you live in the UK and need to use an airports at short notice you have a couple of choices

1 - pay a stupid amount to use the train to the airport - if there is even one running very early in the morning

2 - drive using expensive petrol on crowded roads and park your car at the airport and pay a more to leave your car than you did for your flight.

3 - use a taxi and pay about the same as the other 2 methods.

This whole booking in advance and travelling at off peak times is a joke also. I've had a number of roles where late in the day it has been decided that I need to be in London the following day. Over 200 quid later the late virgin train gets me to London.

What this country is lacking is extra capacity. Instead of faffing about upgrading the west and east coast lines why not build a high speed rail link down the middle as was proposed a while ago and have the slower east and west lines feed this

PRC1964
4th November 2009, 14:25
Would it be possible to get a country who's government knows what they're doing to nationalise our railways for us?

The Spanish seem to have got quite good at running trains. You can take the AVE from Barcelona to Malaga for €133.60 and if it arrives more than five minutes late you get a full refund.

TimberWolf
4th November 2009, 14:27
Perhaps if our trains went a bit faster we could increase line capacity and bring down costs. Or use more carriages, although I gather that option has been ruled out because the platforms would also have to be made longer which would involve knowledge of concrete technology.

AtW
4th November 2009, 14:28
that option has been ruled out because the platforms would also have to me made longer which would involve knowledge of concrete technology.

:rollin:

:yay:

scooterscot
4th November 2009, 14:38
One of the few things I have found good about Switzerland is their public transport. When walking through the baggage hall in the airport there are a couple of machines that dish out free travel tickets for Geneva. Ok the cost normally is 3 francs, but here you get it for free. Now compare that with what you get on arrival at a UK airport.

So if you live in the UK and need to use an airports at short notice you have a couple of choices

1 - pay a stupid amount to use the train to the airport - if there is even one running very early in the morning

2 - drive using expensive petrol on crowded roads and park your car at the airport and pay a more to leave your car than you did for your flight.

3 - use a taxi and pay about the same as the other 2 methods.

This whole booking in advance and travelling at off peak times is a joke also. I've had a number of roles where late in the day it has been decided that I need to be in London the following day. Over 200 quid later the late virgin train gets me to London.

What this country is lacking is extra capacity. Instead of faffing about upgrading the west and east coast lines why not build a high speed rail link down the middle as was proposed a while ago and have the slower east and west lines feed this


You missed one.

4. Pay £1 to use a baggage trolley from arrivals to the train platform.

Always amuses, watching folk attempting to remove a trolley from the rail which it is attached before the frustrated traveler realises they need a pound coin. So they are march back into the airport to buy a newspaper to get change. Luton & Bristol airports we salute you for not allowing such a profiteering opportunity to pass you by.

Paddy
4th November 2009, 14:38
Perhaps if our trains went a bit faster we could increase line capacity and bring down costs. Or use more carriages, although I gather that option has been ruled out because the platforms would also have to be made longer which would involve knowledge of concrete technology.

Already long trains call at short stations. This is not a problem with new trains because the opening of doors can be restricted. The is no excuse for the poor train services other than the government and the general public can not understand the concept that the train companies exist to make the maximum profit with the least effort. They are not there as a public service.

Spacecadet
4th November 2009, 14:40
This whole booking in advance and travelling at off peak times is a joke also. I've had a number of roles where late in the day it has been decided that I need to be in London the following day. Over 200 quid later the late virgin train gets me to London.


The current rail pricing model of offering discounts for booking in advance seem to be specifically designed to hurt the business traveller

scooterscot
4th November 2009, 14:41
They are not there as a public service.

WHS + + another +

They're in it for the profit -

scooterscot
4th November 2009, 14:44
The current rail pricing model of offering discounts for booking in advance seem to be specifically designed to hurt the business traveller

But with a growing elderly population -

Just think Mrs Angus Macduff from Aberdeen shall never need miss another afternoon tea with her long lost cousin Mrs Sue Smith from Cornwall, because they got such a cheap fair booking in advance.

If this story makes it to the news, mark my words, they'll be interviewing Mrs Macduff not :tantrum: business user.