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suityou01
28th November 2009, 09:51
I have 3 kids. They are noisy. Sometimes I want them to be quiet. Take today for example we are having a family gathering (Aunties/Uncles/Grandparents) etc etc. They are great kids, but would be even greater if they had a nice shiny portable DVD player to huddle round.

I'm not for one minute meaning this as a parenting substitute, but something I can wheel out while the adults are having coffees after lunch, say.

For real VFM I wanted something that could be used in the car on long journeys, and can then be taken out of the car and used portably while at said relo's house.

A budget of £100. Anyone got any ideas? I have plundered most sites but it seems they are either for the car or not. No hybrids.

EternalOptimist
28th November 2009, 10:05
I used to play 'silence' with my kids.

I bet you cant sit still for an hour without making any noise at all. Oh you reckon you can eh? ok well if you do it, you win a pound.



:rolleyes:

Board Game Geek
28th November 2009, 10:43
As a non-breeder, I can't really offer any advice.

I can poke fun and go, ha ha ha however, if that helps ?

All I remember when I was growing up and taken to my Aunties, is that they used to pop me in the spare bedroom with lots of colouring books, crayons, cardboard, an Intellivision, plenty of pop and sweets and leave me to it.

Suited me fine, thank you very much.

I remember one time, one of the other aunts brought her nephews (same age as me) over as well, and chucked us in the garden to play.

I mean, a fecking garden. With leaves, twigs and other muck.

I was most indignant.

So I introduced George to a new game called hide and seek.

I told him to hide somewhere in the 100' long garden, with its various toolsheds, and I counted to 20, with my hands over my eyes (but peeking of course).

He went to toolshed number 2. The one with the bolt on the outside.

Silly, silly George.

After incarcerating him, I trundled back to the house, slipped in via a side door, and resumed play on the Intellivision for the next few hours.

When they did find him, he was in a bit of a state (he was 10). Looking back, it was quite horrid I know, but little boys can be horrid.

My punishment ?

"That's the last time George is coming over to play with you. You'll have to play on your own now."

Suited me fine, thank you very much. ;)

suityou01
28th November 2009, 10:46
As a non-breeder, I can't really offer any advice.

I can poke fun and go, ha ha ha however, if that helps ?

All I remember when I was growing up and taken to my Aunties, is that they used to pop me in the spare bedroom with lots of colouring books, crayons, cardboard, an Intellivision, plenty of pop and sweets and leave me to it.

Suited me fine, thank you very much.

I remember one time, one of the other aunts brought her nephews (same age as me) over as well, and chucked us in the garden to play.

I mean, a fliping garden. With leaves, twigs and other muck.

I was most indignant.

So I introduced George to a new game called hide and seek.

I told him to hide somewhere in the 100' long garden, with its various toolsheds, and I counted to 20, with my hands over my eyes (but peeking of course).

He went to toolshed number 2. The one with the bolt on the outside.

Silly, silly George.

After incarcerating him, I trundled back to the house, slipped in via a side door, and resumed play on the Intellivision for the next few hours.

When they did find him, he was in a bit of a state (he was 10). Looking back, it was quite horrid I know, but little boys can be horrid.

My punishment ?

"That's the last time George is coming over to play with you. You'll have to play on your own now."

Suited me fine, thank you very much. ;)

I have to know if my "gadar" is working correctly as it never has. The number of times I have presumed someone was and they weren't

So, are you? :o

oracleslave
28th November 2009, 10:49
We have a 2-screen dvd player. Each kid can watch their own dvd whilst travelling. They work out of the car as well but not a feature we have used. Amazon, about £150 for reasonable quality.

suityou01
28th November 2009, 10:51
We have a 2-screen dvd player. Each kid can watch their own dvd whilst travelling. They work out of the car as well but not a feature we have used. Amazon, about £150 for reasonable quality.

Fantastic. :hug:

Can I have a little more info? How about brand, can we start with brand? Yes, let's start with brand. Oracleslave "WHAT BRAND IS IT PLEASE?"

oracleslave
28th November 2009, 10:54
Fantastic. :hug:

Can I have a little more info? How about brand, can we start with brand? Yes, let's start with brand. Oracleslave "WHAT BRAND IS IT PLEASE?"

Sorry, can't be arsed to go out to the car and look :ind

TheFaQQer
28th November 2009, 10:55
http://www.goodmans.co.uk/productdetails.aspx?pid=GCE67W5DVDK&language=en-GB

In car adapter and mains adapter as well. Not sure if it can be hacked to multi-region, though (haven't tried).

suityou01
28th November 2009, 10:57
http://www.goodmans.co.uk/productdetails.aspx?pid=GCE67W5DVDK&language=en-GB

In car adapter and mains adapter as well. Not sure if it can be hacked to multi-region, though (haven't tried).

Thanks Mr FaQQer sir. :music:

Gonzo
28th November 2009, 10:57
I have to know if my "gadar" is working correctly as it never has. The number of times I have presumed someone was and they weren't

So, are you? :o:rollin:

I have met BGG and I am afraid to have to tell you that the world is more complex than you have yet come to realise.

:rollin:

RichardCranium
28th November 2009, 10:57
This is going to sound like a piss-take, or harsh, but is is actually a serious question. (Consider it a bit of 'hard loving').
I have 3 kids. They are noisy. Sometimes I want them to be quiet. Take today for example we are having a family gathering (Aunties/Uncles/Grandparents) etc etc.Errm. So these kids - are they not part of the family, then?

How are they supposed to learn good behaviour and social skills if they are sent away when there are get-togethers?

Surely good little boys and girls should be being trained to sit quietly and speak when spoken to?

suityou01
28th November 2009, 11:04
This is going to sound like a piss-take, or harsh, but is is actually a serious question. (Consider it a bit of 'hard loving').Errm. So these kids - are they not part of the family, then?

How are they supposed to learn good behaviour and social skills if they are sent away when there are get-togethers?

Surely good little boys and girls should be being trained to sit quietly and speak when spoken to?

Totally agree RC. To be fair, you haven't met my kids. (To quote Ben Elton, "It's like being held hostage by midget terrorists") I dote on my kids I really do, but I will have enough trouble today with the adults. It's 'er family. Can't stickum. Neither can she.

Plus we have some long journeys coming up and an in car DVD did seem like a bright idea.

For example, we had a friend once who (before we had kids) used to put her kids to bed with a DVD to watch.

We vowed never to do that. Every night it's a lovely family routine, and they brush teeth, jimjams on and two stories read to them.

Just sometimes, and the emphasis is on sometimes, it would be handy to have a portable DVD player. As I said before, this is not to be used as a substitute for parenting.

RichardCranium
28th November 2009, 11:13
As I said before, this is not to be used as a substitute for parenting.Oops. So you did. :emb

What about a mug of Calpol each? (Perhaps with a dash of brandy.)

conned tractor
28th November 2009, 11:24
I have 3 kids. They are noisy. Sometimes I want them to be quiet. Take today for example we are having a family gathering (Aunties/Uncles/Grandparents) etc etc. They are great kids, but would be even greater if they had a nice shiny portable DVD player to huddle round.

I'm not for one minute meaning this as a parenting substitute, but something I can wheel out while the adults are having coffees after lunch, say.

For real VFM I wanted something that could be used in the car on long journeys, and can then be taken out of the car and used portably while at said relo's house.

A budget of £100. Anyone got any ideas? I have plundered most sites but it seems they are either for the car or not. No hybrids.

My daughter was given an acoustic solutions portable dvd and it was great for long journeys, or if she wanted to watch some kids film while we were watching something else on the big telly. But one day started to fizz and crack, the battery getting very hot. Don't know what happened but it went in the bin and it was probably lucky I was around when it happened. I know another relative has got her another one for christmas, they can be a good tool for occupying them for a while. Either that or good old fashioned bribery I find works well. The current threat is going on the naughty list - "he's watching you know".

Anyway, you should find one for around that price.

TheFaQQer
28th November 2009, 11:43
Oops. So you did. :emb

What about a mug of Calpol each? (Perhaps with a dash of brandy.)

Medised or phenergan is what you need rather than calpol.

During her first 13 1/2 months of life, my elder daughter slept through the night once. I remember saying to a pharmacist "this says does not cause drowsiness. What use is that to me?!?!?!?!!"

How we all survived I'll never know.

Board Game Geek
28th November 2009, 11:50
I have to know if my "gadar" is working correctly as it never has. The number of times I have presumed someone was and they weren't

So, are you? :o

No, but as Gonzo says, the world is a complex place.

OrangeHopper
28th November 2009, 13:36
Surely good little boys and girls should be being trained to sit quietly and speak when spoken to?

Blimey, who are you kidding? Well behaved, yes. Speak when spoken to, not a chance.

Actually, I think you hit on an important point. They are part of the family and therefore should be part of the gathering, a very important part of the gathering.

OwlHoot
28th November 2009, 13:45
Offer to buy the kids a DVD player if they promise not to think of a piebald donkey for a whole hour.

:rolleyes:

Badger
28th November 2009, 16:59
Bit late I know, but I bought a Ferguson 2 screen dvd player a few years back, cost around £100 for long journeys, not the best of makes but it's been dropped several times, had stuff spilt on it and still works without fault.

It's also been useful at home when one of the kids wants to watch something different to the other. (I have 3 also!).

rhubarb
28th November 2009, 18:17
It's 'er family. Can't stickum.



I feel your pain.
Seriously.

Clippy
28th November 2009, 18:42
Argos (http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Browse/ID72/14419566/c_1/1|category_root|Home+entertainment+and+sat+nav|144 19512/c_2/2|14419512|In+car+entertainment|14419559/c_3/3|cat_14419559|In+car+DVD+players|14419566.htm) or Tesco (http://direct.tesco.com/q/N.1999690/Nr.99.aspx).

MPwannadecentincome
28th November 2009, 23:54
Hey suityou01, I can sympathise with your position I have 3 myself and two of them are too young to understand what "be quiet" or "sit quietly" means for more than 60 seconds!

So occasional distractions like a DVD player can be useful, especially long car journeys.

Be careful though, very young kids are very good at destroying electronic equipment, we are now on our 3rd set of DVD players and because of the squabbling about what to watch they have one each.

Actually having one each proves useful in the home, if the 9 yr old is watching Hannah Montana then the younger ones tend to watch something else on the portable DVD player.

So if your kids are old enough to look after the DVD player then get a good one that will last - sorry I have no recommendations - but if your kids are anything like mine get the cheapest possible and then prepare to replace when broken - ours were from Tesco, actually they have lasted a year already, I think that is a record for the 4 year old!

rootsnall
29th November 2009, 07:14
Medised or phenergan is what you need rather than calpol.

Medised. Top stuff, but you now have to tell a little white lie and say your kids are 7 or 8 or they won't give it to you. My lot have finally started sleeping naturally, so it comes as a shock when they don't, like last night :mad: It was the Mrs turn to go out boozing so I was on duty on my own :suicide:

I still rely on counting bridges or CDs as entertainment when out in the car.

RichardCranium
29th November 2009, 10:16
I still rely on counting bridgesWhen I was little and we made long car journeys, my parents seemed to have loads of tricks like that.

Look for registration year letters but you can only go up by one at a time i.e. find an A reg, then a B reg etc. Repeat in reverse sequence.

Telling me stories of their own lives. (I loved that.) "Never turn down a cup of tea, Private. It might save your life." "The coal is for painting, not lighting."

Teaching me songs and we'd all sing along. "There was rats, rats, big as bloomin' cats in the stores, in the stores...". I think I can sing every Glenn Miller song ever written!

Telling me about the history of the region / place we were passing through.

Telling me things about what they had done when they had once passed through a place.

Getting me to explain to them about stuff I had learned in school that they had not been taught.

However, I was a child that always had library books on the go, so I could entertain myself by reading anyway. Children are still taught to read, aren't they?


With hindsight, through my childhood I must have had scores of hours of tuition by my parents in my family history, my background, my culture, my country. Is that something children are now not receiving? If so, it seems a terrible shame to lose all that to be replaced by Disney's outpourings.

TheFaQQer
29th November 2009, 10:40
I still rely on counting bridges or CDs as entertainment when out in the car.

If we are in the campervan then they have no choice - it's too noisy for DVDs (and for CDs too, really)!


Teaching me songs and we'd all sing along. "There was rats, rats, big as bloomin' cats in the stores, in the stores...". I think I can sing every Glenn Miller song ever written!

That's on the Singing Kettle Magic album, which we have in the car to sing along to.


With hindsight, through my childhood I must have had scores of hours of tuition by my parents in my family history, my background, my culture, my country. Is that something children are now not receiving? If so, it seems a terrible shame to lose all that to be replaced by Disney's outpourings.

It's a good point - the only time we use the DVDs is when we are driving through France and the girls have already been through a day of driving. Last time, I burnt an MP3 CD which alternated - one CD for them, one CD for us. That kept them happy (and asleep some of the time!) rather than spending the whole day moaning about where we were....

suityou01
29th November 2009, 11:42
When I was little and we made long car journeys, my parents seemed to have loads of tricks like that.

Look for registration year letters but you can only go up by one at a time i.e. find an A reg, then a B reg etc. Repeat in reverse sequence.

Telling me stories of their own lives. (I loved that.) "Never turn down a cup of tea, Private. It might save your life." "The coal is for painting, not lighting."

Teaching me songs and we'd all sing along. "There was rats, rats, big as bloomin' cats in the stores, in the stores...". I think I can sing every Glenn Miller song ever written!

Telling me about the history of the region / place we were passing through.

Telling me things about what they had done when they had once passed through a place.

Getting me to explain to them about stuff I had learned in school that they had not been taught.

However, I was a child that always had library books on the go, so I could entertain myself by reading anyway. Children are still taught to read, aren't they?


With hindsight, through my childhood I must have had scores of hours of tuition by my parents in my family history, my background, my culture, my country. Is that something children are now not receiving? If so, it seems a terrible shame to lose all that to be replaced by Disney's outpourings.

I don't know any cool stuff like that though. I'm dull, thick and mildly irritating. You can't choose your parents. :suicide:

Intrigued to know why they painted coal. Praps your parents were total nutters? :freaky:

Sysman
29th November 2009, 11:56
When I was little and we made long car journeys, my parents seemed to have loads of tricks like that.

Look for registration year letters but you can only go up by one at a time i.e. find an A reg, then a B reg etc. Repeat in reverse sequence.


I remember doing the car numbers thing. It was numbers rather than letters; in those days you could actually start out at 1 and work up.

But once we got a bit older there was no talking in the car. Weird but true.

RichardCranium
29th November 2009, 12:19
Intrigued to know why they painted coal.When my Mum was in the Wrens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women's_Royal_Naval_Service) she had some admin office job where she and a more junior rating shared a room in an old house which served some military purpose.

It was April and it started snowing outside. They got colder and colder and eventually my Mum started worrying about this girl she shared the office with; she was going blue. So my Mum lit the fire.

The tulip hit the fan: they were outside the official dates for being permitted to have fires and no officer had authorised the lighting of the fire. My mum was put on a charge, had to pay for the coal and then had to black lead the fireplace, stock it for lighting then whitewash the coal in the fireplace and the coal scuttle.

Her memorable bit was an NCO screaming at her "The coal is for painting, not for lighting".


As an aside, as any ex-forces bod will tell you: "If it moves, salute it. If it doesn't move, pick it up. If you can't pick it up, paint it."

suityou01
29th November 2009, 12:23
When my Mum was in the Wrens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women's_Royal_Naval_Service) she had some admin office job where she and a more junior rating shared a room in an old house which served some military purpose.

It was April and it started snowing outside. They got colder and colder and eventually my Mum started worrying about this girl she shared the office with; she was going blue. So my Mum lit the fire.

The tulip hit the fan: they were outside the official dates for being permitted to have fires and no officer had authorised the lighting of the fire. My mum was put on a charge, had to pay for the coal and then had to black lead the fireplace, stock it for lighting then whitewash the coal in the fireplace and the coal scuttle.

Her memorable bit was an NCO screaming at her "The coal is for painting, not for lighting".


As an aside, as any ex-forces bod will tell you: "If it moves, salute it. If it doesn't move, pick it up. If you can't pick it up, paint it."

Good times. :rolleyes:

RichardCranium
29th November 2009, 12:45
I don't know any cool stuff like that though. I'm dull, thick and mildly irritating.Surely you have stories of your own life? How you & Mrs SY01 met & courted? Things you have learned upon The Way of Life? Places you have been and things you have seen? What for you was a holiday in Spain is a fantasy about faraway lands to them. What about stories about your own parents and your own childhood? And what stories have you inherited from your grandparents, siblings and aunts & uncles?

If you do not practice recalling and telling the stories, they will be lost for ever.

I find it utterly horrific that there are cultures that have passed down stories for centuries and even millennia that will be discarded for Bambi, Dumbo, the feckin Aristocats and a poxy twat of a human-sized mouse.

And if you assume you are dull and boring and tell your kids nothing about yourselves, then your kids will call you boring. Because you will be.

Tell them stories about how you were nearly crushed to death by a tank transporter but were saved by a cup of tea, how the black market from the docks to the markets worked, what life was really like in a wartime mill town, what can happen when you volunteer for something during National Service, bomb disposal in Algiers, blowing up arms dumps in the desert (and accidentally taking out a tribe of passing nomads in the process), not being invited to your own mother's funeral, being ordered to steal 20 tonnes of anthracite, getting a story in the Liverpool papers about a doodlebug going off when actually it was you and your mates with a drum of carbide you'd 'found', suddenly walking out of work and going home and meeting your sister on the way there who is running home from school during classtime to get home and find your mum dead, how your ancestors come from a different part of the country from what you thought and your dad's family ended up north and down the pits by accident and shall I go on?

Admittedly our generation don't have the stories our parents had, but if you don't tell the ones you have, they're lost forever and your children lose something that should belong to them: who they are and where they come from.

Badger
29th November 2009, 12:49
... and your dad's family ended up north and down the pits by accident and shall I go on?

Yes!

These are like EO's stories which were great.

More please.

RichardCranium
29th November 2009, 13:03
More please.Ask your parents / aunts / uncles / grandparents for theirs! :D

Because then they will be your stories too.

suityou01
29th November 2009, 13:06
Admittedly our generation don't have the stories our parents had, but if you don't tell the ones you have, they're lost forever and your children lose something that should belong to them: who they are and where they come from.

You're not kidding. My life is the sum total of working, the occasional holiday, DIY and family time. Pretty normal. It's not got the same ring to it

Hey remember that time I first filed a VAT return on line.
Hey remember when I built that garden wall.
Hey I know I remember when I first met you mum, we went to the cinema and the pub.

I am dull. Dull dull dull dull dull. And I suspect most on here are too.

Of course if the Bilderberg group get there way and America invades Iran then life could become quite technicolor. :D

RichardCranium
29th November 2009, 13:33
I am dull.You only think that because that is how the media makes us think. But they are wrong.

You are your children's Daddy. When they are little, they know you are the most important man in the world. They want to know what you do and how you do it. They want to know your moral values and your prejudices. They want to know you love them and that you think they are good. They want you to spend time with them.

Am I right in thinking you are the Director of a Limited Company? Isn't that exciting?

Does Daddy work in the most famous city in the world? In the finance sector too? Wow! How special is that? Do you work near that big tower block that you can see from all round the South East? Do you cross the Thames to get to work? Do you see the boats?

How did you come to meet your wife? What did you see in her? Can you see those things in your kids? If so, how exciting must that be for them?

You built the garden wall? I can't do that; that kind of practical work seems to be beyond my abilities. But for computers I have no idea what I would be doing. Can you teach your children how to do practical things? How to make things from scrap? My dad can but never found the time to teach me.

You are underestimating yourself, what you can do and your value.

suityou01
29th November 2009, 14:08
You only think that because that is how the media makes us think. But they are wrong.

You are your children's Daddy. When they are little, they know you are the most important man in the world. They want to know what you do and how you do it. They want to know your moral values and your prejudices. They want to know you love them and that you think they are good. They want you to spend time with them.

Am I right in thinking you are the Director of a Limited Company? Isn't that exciting?

Does Daddy work in the most famous city in the world? In the finance sector too? Wow! How special is that? Do you work near that big tower block that you can see from all round the South East? Do you cross the Thames to get to work? Do you see the boats?

How did you come to meet your wife? What did you see in her? Can you see those things in your kids? If so, how exciting must that be for them?

You built the garden wall? I can't do that; that kind of practical work seems to be beyond my abilities. But for computers I have no idea what I would be doing. Can you teach your children how to do practical things? How to make things from scrap? My dad can but never found the time to teach me.

You are underestimating yourself, what you can do and your value.

Kind words RC. I think I need to buck up. It's been a tough year all in all. Birth of third child. moving house, "that project manager" episode. I can't remember the last time I took time off. Still, I have a lot to be thankful for.

And I have done stuff. Rebuilt the car engine when we had no money and it was still on finance and it blew up. Built chuffing huge garden retaining wall. Flown a plane on honeymoon with SY02 in the back.

And I hope to cycle from Lands End to John O'Groats. Lots of adventures to be had as well.

RichardCranium
29th November 2009, 14:17
Rebuilt the car engine
Built chuffing huge garden retaining wall
Flown a plane on honeymoon with SY02 in the back.
hope to cycle from Lands End to John O'Groats.F***. :(

I'm a failure.

The biggest achievement in my life to date is setting up the security on a WiFi router. And then I lost its password.

:suicide:

suityou01
29th November 2009, 14:22
F***. :(

I'm a failure.

The biggest achievement in my life to date is setting up the security on a WiFi router. And then I lost its password.

:suicide:

Those wifi routers are tricky. Did I hear you say you were self teaching yourself VB.Net? Set up a forum. Don't really sound like much of a failure to me.

Lost the router password? DP nearly formatted the wrong HDD the other night. :D

For interest, take a look at the Certified Ethical Hacker course. Chuffing interesting I think. I have covered all of the topics but never sat the exam.

TheFaQQer
29th November 2009, 14:27
Kind words RC. I think I need to buck up. It's been a tough year all in all. Birth of third child. moving house, "that project manager" episode. I can't remember the last time I took time off. Still, I have a lot to be thankful for.

And I have done stuff. Rebuilt the car engine when we had no money and it was still on finance and it blew up. Built chuffing huge garden retaining wall. Flown a plane on honeymoon with SY02 in the back.

And I hope to cycle from Lands End to John O'Groats. Lots of adventures to be had as well.

Just bitch and moan about your in-laws. Get them trained young in sarcastic put downs and barbs. That's what I seem to have taught mine - DD1 (now 6) just rolls her eyes at me now. I think it's a trick she picked up from her mother.

NickFitz
29th November 2009, 18:15
I have to know if my "gadar" is working correctly as it never has. The number of times I have presumed someone was and they weren't

So, are you? :o

Ask Halo Jones (http://forums.contractoruk.com/members/halo-jones.html) :rolleyes:

NickFitz
29th November 2009, 18:31
When I was little and we made long car journeys, my parents seemed to have loads of tricks like that...


"When I was your age, I would have run straight up to the top of that hill!"

Said in this layby on the Horseshoe Pass (http://maps.google.co.uk/?ie=UTF8&ll=53.016048,-3.205819&spn=0.003485,0.009162&t=k&z=17).

It got me and my brother out of their hair for half an hour :laugh