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SupremeSpod
13th July 2010, 12:12
BBC News - Three British soldiers killed in Afghanistan (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/10610068.stm)



Three British soldiers have been killed and four injured by a rogue Afghan soldier in Afghanistan.
The men were on duty early on Tuesday morning at a checkpoint in Nahr-e Saraj, Helmand province, when the Afghan opened fire with a rocket-propelled grenade.
One of the dead is believed to be a Nepalese Gurkha and the other two were described as UK nationals.
An investigation is under way and next of kin are being informed.
There is a helpline number in the UK for concerned relatives - 08457 800900.
Afghan President Hamid Karzai has apologised to the UK after the incident.
It is understood there will not be any further confirmation of the circumstances surrounding the incident until the next of kin are informed.
An Afghan defence ministry spokesman said an Afghan soldier was being sought following the incident.

Exit strategy
The news emerged from the Afghan president Hamid Karzai.
BBC defence correspondent Caroline Wyatt said the incident will re-awaken memories of last November, when an Afghan policeman shot dead five British soldiers in their compound, and seriously wounded six others.
The Afghan army is being partnered and mentored by British troops across Helmand.
Our correspondent also said this latest tragedy will again intensify debate over the human costs of the mission in Afghanistan - and over whether the West's exit strategy, which relies on training the Afghan army and police, can hope to succeed.
Downing Street said Prime Minister David Cameron was being kept informed about the incident.
The BBC's Quentin Sommerville, who is in Kabul, said similar incidents have happened in the past but it is not always insurgents who are behind it.

He said that sometimes local matters and other grievances can be behind it. The incident was "undoubtedly a blow" to morale not just for the trainers but the Afghan forces as well, he added.
The Nato commander in Afghanistan, General David Petraeus, said: "This is a combined joint mission - Afghan and Alliance troopers fighting shoulder to shoulder against the Taliban and other extremists.
"We have sacrificed greatly together and we must ensure the trust between our forces remains solid in order to defeat our common enemies."

Soldier segregation
Col Richard Kemp, a former commander of British troops in Afghanistan, told the BBC it was important to remember that this was an isolated incident and "not a pattern of events".
He said: "The sort of thing you could do is to not allow Afghan forces to be armed with live ammunition in the same base as British troops unless they're about to go out on patrol but that would severely undermine trust.
"You could segregate bases between the two but that would not only undermine trust but it would also prevent the essential partnering that's taking place."
Maj Gen Patrick Cordingley, a former commander in the first Gulf War, told the BBC feelings would be "running high" over the next few days, "not only among the soldiers involved but also in this country, where people are going to continue to ask the question 'Is it all worthwhile?'"
He added: "It is this whole business now of trying to overcome the problem, and not let feelings run high, and trying to work out if there are some rogue elements in those soldiers and policemen who they're trying to train, but that's going to be difficult if you don't speak the same language."
A Ministry of Defence spokesman said: "We are aware of an incident this morning in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand Province involving Isaf troops.
"An investigation is under way and more details will be released when appropriate."

swamp
13th July 2010, 12:16
Sounds like a brave chap.

BdP
13th July 2010, 12:20
be worth it.

Most of the 'terrists' are in Pakistan, anyhow.

MarillionFan
13th July 2010, 12:23
Sounds like a brave chap.

Bouncer no doubt!

There are going to be dozens of these insurgents biding their time. It will probably come to a head as we look to withdraw

shaunbhoy
13th July 2010, 17:42
Heard a suggestion the other day that we could simply keep the taleban sweet by buying all their poppy crops and using it to make Morphine and other useful drugs for use in the West.
They would then have no need of the money from Al Qaeda etc., and it would be cheaper for us both financially and in terms of lives lost too.
Of course, quantifying the figures is a little subjective, but ought to be worth exploring shirley?

Paddy
13th July 2010, 17:54
Heard a suggestion the other day that we could simply keep the taleban sweet by buying all their poppy crops and using it to make Morphine and other useful drugs for use in the West.
They would then have no need of the money from Al Qaeda etc., and it would be cheaper for us both financially and in terms of lives lost too.
Of course, quantifying the figures is a little subjective, but ought to be worth exploring shirley?

Something I absolutely agree with but I don’t know why this is not done.

Also the action of the US forces have a lot to answer for when it come to random killings by non-Taliban. Only last week there was a US raid on an Afghan home where kids and a baby were shot. the US blamed wrong intelligence.