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gricerboy
17th July 2010, 06:10
while I was undertaking my recent research travelling around the North West region I was struck by how much of the track wasn't put down to continuous rail and it led me to reconsider exactly what is continuous rail. On my daily commute from WSM to Swindon I hear the odd bit of clicketty clack even though the line is designated ad continuous rail. I thought it would be interesting to travel the whole length of the line from Bristol to Paddington and count hoe many joins there are in the track and compare the figure to other routes. The only problem is the process of doing the counting; I could use one of those things that they use on planes when they're doing a headcount but I don't trust myself to remain alert enough for the whole operation so I was wondering if anyone knew of a more intelligent device that would register the clicketty clacks as we passed over them.

Durbs
17th July 2010, 07:35
so I was wondering if anyone knew of a more intelligent device that would register the clicketty clacks as we passed over them.

I spent 6 months walking the West Coast mainline and various other places for a route clearance project measuring bridges and how far stuff was from the running line. We used a trundle wheel, clipboard and pencil. Now that WAS as good project. HTH.

I also used to fix the datum plates to platforms (next time you are on a platform, look for the little white plates fixed to the platform wall by the track). That was also a good project if you didn't mind kneeling in trud-ridden bog roll.

Maybe GPS, start when you hear the first clickety clack, stop when no more clickety clacks / 66ft = approx clickety clack total.

BolshieBastard
17th July 2010, 09:16
Continuous rail is welded to form lengths up to several kilometers long. However, the quality of weld can make this an exceptionally quiet ride or, if not done so well, you can still 'feel' the joint in continuous rail as the wheels pass over them.

I used to do the trans pennine route to Halifax until recently. The line is a mixture of continuous rail and old style 18m fishplate jointed line. In some places, the continous rail is almost bumpy as the fishplate stuff!

gricerboy
18th July 2010, 08:34
Maybe GPS, start when you hear the first clickety clack, stop when no more clickety clacks / 66ft = approx clickety clack total.

Wow! Great idea! I could then build a map of where the clicketty clacks occur all over the rail network and maybe sell it to Network Rail. My Lordz! I think I have a plan B!

shaunbhoy
18th July 2010, 13:23
Wow! Great idea! I could then build a map of where the clicketty clacks occur all over the rail network and maybe sell it to Network Rail. My Lordz! I think I have a plan B!

Yes........a dynamic clickety-clack map. That would sell like hotcakes!!
This time next year rodders!!

:tumble:

threaded
18th July 2010, 15:54
Wow! Great idea! I could then build a map of where the clicketty clacks occur all over the rail network and maybe sell it to Network Rail. My Lordz! I think I have a plan B!

Already exists and you're about 30 years or so late.

fullyautomatix
18th July 2010, 17:05
Aren't you better off asking in a train forum ? What sense does it make asking this in a contractor's forum ?