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DimPrawn
19th January 2011, 09:36
This might be of interest to a few people here.

BBC News - Buying a car with the taxman's help (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-12218018)

There are hundreds of thousands of privately-owned companies in the UK.

If you own one of them, you can use the current tax rules to your advantage perfectly legitimately.

Consider the following scenario. Your 18-year-old daughter is off to university, and you want to get her a £10,000 car so that she can visit home.

You have two options: pay for it personally or get your company to buy it.

If it is bought via the company, then in the normal course of events you will be taxed on what is called the benefit-in-kind that you are receiving.

A company car with no CO2 emissions - such as an electric car - accrues no benefit-in-kind tax charge at all.

As emissions rise, so does the value of the taxable benefit, on a scale set by the Revenue.

So cars with emissions of up to 75g per km result in an annual taxable benefit of only 5% of the list price of the car when new.

Emissions between 76g and 120g per km will result in a taxable benefit of 10%.

And those between 121g and 130g are deemed to produce a benefit worth 15% of the list price when new.

After that, there is an additional 1% rise in the taxable benefit for each 5g of CO2 and a further 3% if the car is diesel.

The cash cost

So if you are a 40% taxpayer - and company owner - the true cash cost to you of supplying your daughter with a £10,000 car, with emissions between 121g and 130g, will be only £600 (£10,000 x 15% x 40%) per annum.

Remember, the car has been bought by the company and the cash that you pay is the tax for receiving a benefit-in-kind.

This charge covers all expenses paid by the company, other than fuel, and specifically includes inexperienced driver motor insurance for your 18-year-old, which is also paid by the company.

The cost of supplying the car in the lower emissions brackets mentioned previously would be nil, £200 per year and £400 per year respectively.

Meanwhile, your company will be able to claim full corporation tax relief for it too, making the deal even sweeter.



For example a BMW 320d EfficientDynamics Saloon - with particle filter has a CO2 of 109 as do a few Audi A3 models, or an Alfa Giulietta 1.6 JTDm-2.

Mich the Tester
19th January 2011, 09:38
Consider the following scenario. Your 18-year-old daughter is off to university, and you want to get her a £10,000 car so that she can visit home.

You have two options: pay for it personally or get your company to buy it.

Third option. Tell the scrounging little bint to get a part time job and buy a second hand Micra for a few hundred quid.

DimPrawn
19th January 2011, 09:40
Third option. Tell the scrounging little bint to get a part time job and buy a second hand Micra for a few hundred quid.

You don't have to buy it for the kids, you can buy it for yourself, your missus or even your mistress. :wink

Point being you are buying it out of untaxed earnings and only paying a few hundred quid a year in tax, and all maintenance costs out of untaxed income too.

Mich the Tester
19th January 2011, 09:41
You don't have to buy it for the kids, you can buy it for yourself, your missus or even your mistress. :wink

Oh well then it'll be an S-Class, please.

MarillionFan
19th January 2011, 09:42
Just buy her a white van. That way you get the VAT back and you can put the lot through the business as a legitimate commercial vehicle.

Dearnla
19th January 2011, 11:18
Or buy a motorcycle - I've got one that I pay about £300 BIK charge for.
:smokin

Pickle2
19th January 2011, 11:22
I saw one of these parked in the "park for free, electric only" spots in the west end last week.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/09/21/automobiles/600-tesla.jpg

Made me smile, the only car you usually see there is a crappy mr bean mini moke.

Just a thought...