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kaiser78
4th February 2011, 09:14
I have a second interview next week for a role based 30 miles away, so 300 miles a week which I would commute by car.

I have been looking to buying a second car anyway but looking a petrol options until now. Would the 300 miles a week justify looking at diesel options given the higher economy mpgs, or would the savings be negligable, given that diesel is generally more expensive than petrol anyway ?

Churchill
4th February 2011, 09:17
I have a second interview next week for a role based 30 miles away, so 300 miles a week which I would commute by car.

I have been looking to buying a second car anyway but looking a petrol options until now. Would the 300 miles a week justify looking at diesel options given the higher economy mpgs, or would the savings be negligable, given that diesel is generally more expensive than petrol anyway ?

FTW - Mercedes E320CDI saloon, plenty of reliability, performance, comfort and economy for reasonable money.

Fred Bloggs
4th February 2011, 09:18
Be aware of problems with DPF's (particle filters) on modern diesels. They are known to clog and cost a lot of money to replace if the car is used mainly for short ditances or for longer distances if crawling in traffic. If your 30 miles is at a decent sustained speed though, you'll be OK.

Paddy
4th February 2011, 09:18
MPG Calculator - Work out your car's actual fuel consumption (http://www.usedcarexpert.co.uk/free-advice/mpg-fuel-calculator/)

DaveB
4th February 2011, 09:53
I have a second interview next week for a role based 30 miles away, so 300 miles a week which I would commute by car.

I have been looking to buying a second car anyway but looking a petrol options until now. Would the 300 miles a week justify looking at diesel options given the higher economy mpgs, or would the savings be negligable, given that diesel is generally more expensive than petrol anyway ?

I recently had to drive a 1.6 petrol Astra for a week or so while my regular car, a 2.0 diesel Volvo, was off the road.

Average fuel prices in my area are 128.1/ltr for petrol and 132.6 for diesel.

This equates to £5.82/gallon for petrol and £6.00/gallon for diesel.

According to the trip computers on the two I got 35mpg out of the Astra and I get 45mpg from the Volvo.

This works out to 23p/mile for petrol and 13p/m for diesel.

These figures are from a daily 120 mile round trip split between A roads and motorway.

ps. As a car the Astra was shit.

Doggy Styles
4th February 2011, 09:58
Go for the deisel. Cheaper (and better in snowy conditions during the coming ice age).

FWIW Honda do bloody good deisel engines.

DimPrawn
4th February 2011, 11:53
A big factor is whether the journey is mostly stop start traffic or motorway miles.

If it's motorway, diesel is the way to go. If it's mostly town driving and lots of stop starts, a modern petrol engine would be a better choice as they are more responsive to the throttle and the diesel filters soon clog in city driving (big expense!).

Engine of the year was a petrol last year:

INTERNATIONAL ENGINE OF THE YEAR 2010 (http://www.ukipme.com/engineoftheyear/winners_10/bestnew.html)

Taking as an example the 170bhp variant of the winning 1.4-litre turbo engine, which appears in the Alfa MiTo Cloverleaf, Alfa claims 6 l/100km (47mpg) on the combined cycle for the 170bhp unit, which is more than half a litre less than the previous 155bhp, non-MultiAir engine. A start/ stop system also helps cut fuel consumption levels.


A 170 bhp diesel engine would not do many more MPG, especially around town.

Doggy Styles
4th February 2011, 11:59
I suppose it also depends on whether you after a proper contractor's car or a sensible one.

Halo Jones
4th February 2011, 12:39
I have a diesel & as I do 150miles / day mostly motorways it works out for me, I plan to keep it for 2 years then consider getting one of these (http://www.greencarsite.co.uk/econews/Volkswagen-XL1-Super-Efficient-Vehicle.htm)for work & a TT for fun / home

pastalista
4th February 2011, 13:33
Hi

I just got one of these for work (I do around 400 miles per week).

Roughly 80mpg (no, really) on a run and 65 around town. Nearly 1000 miles on a tankful.

Zero road tax as the emissions are below 99g/km

VW comfort and reliability

Good to drive, reasonably brisk and handles well despite the low rolling resistance tyres. Stop / start takes a bit of getting used to but once you do, it's great. It looks quite cool as well because it has been lowered to reduce resistance.

I'm no bleeding heart liberal but I like the feeling of driving something like this everyday and it makes me feel less guilty (well, a bit) about my Jensen Interceptor with the 7.2 litre engine that I kill trees with at the weekends.

Get the right one and diesels are great.

And this from a very committed petrolhead (I also have a 750cc bike and an Audi RS4).

Pastalista

Dearnla
4th February 2011, 13:40
Depreciation will cost you loads more than fuel, so buy carefully. So the less it costs in the first place, the less you will lose when you sell.
So, for ultimate economy, buy a £500 banger with a year's ticket - even if you chuck it away after the year, it will have cost you less than any new car.....

Or to put it another way, YES.

gingerjedi
4th February 2011, 15:25
I recently had to drive a 1.6 petrol Astra for a week or so while my regular car, a 2.0 diesel Volvo, was off the road.

Average fuel prices in my area are 128.1/ltr for petrol and 132.6 for diesel.

This equates to £5.82/gallon for petrol and £6.00/gallon for diesel.

According to the trip computers on the two I got 35mpg out of the Astra and I get 45mpg from the Volvo.

This works out to 23p/mile for petrol and 13p/m for diesel.

These figures are from a daily 120 mile round trip split between A roads and motorway.

ps. As a car the Astra was tulip.

£5.82 / 35 = 16.6p per mile Shirley?

Are you a climatologist?

Lumiere
7th February 2011, 15:52
So, for ultimate economy, buy a £500 banger with a year's ticket - even if you chuck it away after the year, it will have cost you less than any new car.....

Presuming it does not break, which is gambling and possible time off the road.

DimPrawn
7th February 2011, 16:03
Go for the deisel. Cheaper (and better in snowy conditions during the coming ice age).

FWIW Honda do bloody good deisel engines.

I'm curious to know why a diesel is better in snowy conditions, seeing diesel starts to turn to wax in cold temperatures and petrol doesn't?

Diesel engines tend to be heavier too, which is no advantage on snow.

:confused:

DaveB
7th February 2011, 16:22
I'm curious to know why a diesel is better in snowy conditions, seeing diesel starts to turn to wax in cold temperatures and petrol doesn't?

Diesel engines tend to be heavier too, which is no advantage on snow.

:confused:

Diesels tend to have a lot more torque at low revs making it easier to drive without spinning the wheels.

Waxing of diesel fuel isn't an issue these days as additives are used to prevent it happening. My Diesel engined Volvo started and ran quite happily at -14 during the recent cold snap.

Having more weight over the driving wheels helps a lot with low speed grip in slippery conditions as well.

TykeMerc
7th February 2011, 16:27
Diesels tend to have a lot more torque at low revs making it easier to drive without spinning the wheels.

Waxing of diesel fuel isn't an issue these days as additives are used to prevent it happening. My Diesel engined Volvo started and ran quite happily at -14 during the recent cold snap.

Having more weight over the driving wheels helps a lot with low speed grip in slippery conditions as well.

/Agree on all counts.

I'd think with the higher tax rate on diesel fuel and the premium you pay for the vehicle to start off with unless you're doing a fairly high mileage it's debatable if there's any financial benefit to diesel these days.

DaveB
7th February 2011, 16:35
/Agree on all counts.

I'd think with the higher tax rate on diesel fuel and the premium you pay for the vehicle to start off with unless you're doing a fairly high mileage it's debatable if there's any financial benefit to diesel these days.

3.6p per mile cheaper with diesel according to my (corrected by GingerJedi) calculations. That's a tenner a week based on the OP's predicted mileage.

stek
7th February 2011, 16:55
When I did my 500 miles a week contract, I had a diesel Pug 405, never got more than 44mpg from it. Then I got an Alfa 166 (still have it) an I could get 42mpg out of it, more normally tho, 38mpg.

Diesel fuel more expensive, needs more regular servicing, plus that horrible diesel over-rev when changing gear, much prefer petrol.

Paddy
7th February 2011, 17:30
When I did my 500 miles a week contract, I had a diesel Pug 405, never got more than 44mpg from it. Then I got an Alfa 166 (still have it) an I could get 42mpg out of it, more normally tho, 38mpg.

Diesel fuel more expensive, needs more regular servicing, plus that horrible diesel over-rev when changing gear, much prefer petrol.
:confused:
Obviously something wrong with your Pug. The PSU 1.9TD was one of the best made that’s why taxi drivers bought the 300,000 to 500,000 miles are not uncommon.

stek
7th February 2011, 17:55
:confused:
Obviously something wrong with your Pug. The PSU 1.9TD was one of the best made that’s why taxi drivers bought the 300,000 to 500,000 miles are not uncommon.

Was old - P reg, 208,000 miles on it when the electrics went wonky so I flogged it.

Paddy
7th February 2011, 18:03
Was old - P reg, 208,000 miles on it when the electrics went wonky so I flogged it.

If there was a problem with the engine electrics that would more then likely be caused by dirt on the flywheel that then gives false readings to the sensor and EMU. A squirt of window cleaner through the vent would fix that

stek
7th February 2011, 18:24
If there was a problem with the engine electrics that would more then likely be caused by dirt on the flywheel that then gives false readings to the sensor and EMU. A squirt of window cleaner through the vent would fix that

It was two main issues, one the driver leccy window only opened in 2mm steps - bit annoying at parking booths...

But the main one was a total loss of any attempt to start, not even a whirring of the bendix let alone any starter motor activity. 10 mins later and it would be fine. Battery was fine, alternator fine....

And on top it was losing water, plus it blew headlamp bulbs with annoying regularity, plus I fancied an Alfa!

Paid £450 for the Pug, flogged it for £300 after two years.

Nice car, enjoyed owning it but the Alfa is eons better for me...

DimPrawn
8th February 2011, 21:38
Perfect diesel contractors car:

Lucky Dip : london Taxi Cab (http://www.pistonheads.com/sales/2359245.htm)

Great for a bit of moonlighting on the way home.

DimPrawn
8th February 2011, 21:40
Alternatively, how about a Passat?

Lucky Dip : Volkswagon Passat Coupe MK1 (http://www.pistonheads.com/sales/2409826.htm)

Newer than Milan's!

lightng
8th February 2011, 23:18
I have a second interview next week for a role based 30 miles away, so 300 miles a week which I would commute by car.

I have been looking to buying a second car anyway but looking a petrol options until now. Would the 300 miles a week justify looking at diesel options given the higher economy mpgs, or would the savings be negligable, given that diesel is generally more expensive than petrol anyway ?

300 miles + on a gallon here on topgear (http://www.topgear.com/uk/car-news/volkswagen-xl1-concept-hybrid-2011-01-26)

manclarky
9th February 2011, 08:40
Depreciation will cost you loads more than fuel, so buy carefully

Sorry, but I have to disagree with that. Admittedly, I possibly drive more than average (66 miles each way = 660 miles / week = 30,000+pa), but I spend over £150 a week on fuel - but even a modest car could easily spend £100 a week.

Assuming 3 years, that's £15k - and still £5k per annum. Not too many cars would lose £15k in depreciation over 3 years, especially if bought second hand.

DimPrawn
9th February 2011, 10:03
Sorry, but I have to disagree with that. Admittedly, I possibly drive more than average (66 miles each way = 660 miles / week = 30,000+pa), but I spend over £150 a week on fuel - but even a modest car could easily spend £100 a week.

Assuming 3 years, that's £15k - and still £5k per annum. Not too many cars would lose £15k in depreciation over 3 years, especially if bought second hand.

I'm sorry you are wrong. Wrong! Wrong! Wrong!

Look how much I've lost on my Maybach in one year! £127K in depreciation.


Make Model Cash lost during 2009
1 Maybach 62 (03 on) £127,526
2 Maybach 57 (03 on) £115,253
3 Rolls-Royce Phantom (03 on) £81,183
4 Bentley Arnage (98 on) £66,040
5 Ferrari 612 Scaglietti (05 on) £51,627
6 Mercedes-Benz SL Class AMG (02 on) £51,381
7 Bentley Cont. Flying Spur (05 on) £47,080
8 Aston Martin DBS (08 on) £41,347
9 Bentley Continental GT Coupe £40,110
10 Ferrari F 430 (05 on) £37,188




The best performers of 2009


Make
Model
Cash lost during 2009

1
Honda
Jazz (08 on)
£1379

2
Fiat
500 (08 on)
£1460

3
SEAT
Ibiza (08 on)
£1552

4
Hyundai
i10 (08 on)
£1650

5
Mazda
2 (07 on)
£1702

6
Kia
Picanto (04 on)
£1760

7
Volkswagen
Fox (06 on)
£1781

8
Suzuki
Swift (05 on)
£1900

9
Toyota
Aygo (05 on)
£2148

10
Mitsubishi
i (07 on)
£2271

manclarky
9th February 2011, 13:53
£127K in depreciation.

There you go then - if you buy a car on DP's first list, then there's no need to worry about the cost of filling it up.
If you go for the second list, depreciation isn't the worry - fuel is.

kaiser78
20th February 2011, 13:32
There you go then - if you buy a car on DP's first list, then there's no need to worry about the cost of filling it up.
If you go for the second list, depreciation isn't the worry - fuel is.

Luck or unlucky timing I went for a petrol merc class, 53 plate which I picked up week before last. Then last week I accepted a role 95 or so miles round trip. Had I know I may have gone for a diesel model ! Never mind, think overall cost based on these miles is more or less the same.