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View Full Version : Monday Links from the Subsidised Canteen Vol. LIX



NickFitz
14th February 2011, 19:21
It still feels weird having a gig close enough to home that I get back at a reasonable hour, and therefore have time to put this lot together for your edification:


The 2010 “Editing Wikipedia From Inside Parliament” Awards (http://www.tomscott.com/wikiparliament/) - "Here's a fact: Wikipedia stores the IP addresses of anonymous users. Here's another fact: all of the web traffic from the Houses of Parliament is sent through one of two proxy servers — which means that every anonymous edit to Wikipedia from within Parliament is attributed to one of just two IP addresses. I'm sure you can see where this is going." Tom Scott hauls a few skeletons out of our elected representatives' assorted closets.


I Think You're Fat (http://www.esquire.com/print-this/honesty0707?page=all) - "This story is about something called Radical Honesty. It may change your life. (But honestly, we don't really care.)" A. J. Jacobs gives psychotherapist Brad Blanton's ideas about total honesty a try in real life, with interesting and sometimes surprising results.


Captured: The Ruins of Detroit (http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2011/02/07/captured-the-ruins-of-detroit/2672/) - "Up and down Detroit’s streets, buildings stand abandoned and in ruin. French photographers Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre set out to document the decline of an American city." Fascinating gallery of abandoned buildings, including a library still containing many books, and a police station whose floor is littered with discarded mugshots.


When Soaps Die (http://www.offthetelly.co.uk/?page_id=44) - "For a country where more people read about the mercurial fortunes of their TV favourites than actually watch them on the box, it’s still the case there’s little which sets the pulses racing faster than the whiff of an impending national execution. And there’s no greater quarry than an ailing soap opera." Ian Jones examines the phenomenon of the dying TV soap opera. I'd never realised just how bizarre the final episode of Brookside was (because, like almost everybody else, I didn't watch it.)


Open Sourcing My Genetic Data (http://manu.sporny.org/2011/public-domain-genome/) - "Today, I published all of my known genetic data as open source and released all my rights to the data. Roughly 1 million of my genetic markers are now in the public domain. I believe that I’m one of the first people in the world to commit my genetic data into a decentralized source control system." Manu Sporny explains why and how he's given his genetic code to the world for free.


Studio Multitracks: Gimme Shelter (http://www.studiomultitracks.com/2011/01/gimme-shelter/) - "One of the more amazing recent developments in music is the ability to hear isolated tracks from many of the best songs in rock history. You can hear things you’ve never heard before even if you’ve heard the song 1000 times. For anyone who’s recorded or listened to music, this is a major treasure trove. This blog aims to seek these tracks out." There's loads of material on this blog; I've linked to the Rolling Stones' Gimme Shelter broken down into separate tracks for vocals, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, percussion/drums, and bass.


All the volcano webcams of the world (http://bigthink.com/ideas/26619) - "So, I finally got this project done! We all do a lot of webcam watching here on Eruptions. A lot of the time when a new eruption occurs, the first question posted is 'is there a webcam?', so I thought I’d try to come up with a definitive list of extant volcano webcam, organized by region of the world." This list should save you the trouble and inconvenience of travelling halfway around the world only to be immolated by a pyroclastic flow.


2045: The Year Man Becomes Immortal (http://www.time.com/time/printout/0,8816,2048138,00.html) - Good article about The Singluarity, and particularly Ray Kurzweil: "Kurzweil believes that we're approaching a moment when computers will become intelligent, and not just intelligent but more intelligent than humans. When that happens, humanity — our bodies, our minds, our civilization — will be completely and irreversibly transformed. He believes that this moment is not only inevitable but imminent. According to his calculations, the end of human civilization as we know it is about 35 years away."


How Deaf People Think (http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2010/07/how-deaf-people-think/) - "Today I found out how deaf people think in terms of their “inner voice”. It turns out, this varies somewhat from deaf person to deaf person, depending on their level of deafness and vocal training. Those who were born completely deaf and only learned sign language will, not surprisingly, think in sign language. What is surprising is those who were born completely deaf but learn to speak through vocal training will occasionally think not only in the particular sign language that they know, but also will sometimes think in the vocal language they learned, with their brains coming up with how the vocal language sounds. Primarily though, most completely deaf people think in sign language. Similar to how an “inner voice” of a hearing person is experienced in one’s own voice, a completely deaf person sees or, more aptly, feels themselves signing in their head as they “talk” in their heads."


People Who (http://peoplewho.us/) - You've probably met most of these one time or another - e.g. "People who turn down real-life social activities because they've made commitments in their online game."


Happy invoicing! :wave:

cailin maith
14th February 2011, 19:50
:laugh I like the People Who one.

dang65
14th February 2011, 23:08
Captured: The Ruins of Detroit (http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2011/02/07/captured-the-ruins-of-detroit/2672/) - "Up and down Detroit’s streets, buildings stand abandoned and in ruin. French photographers Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre set out to document the decline of an American city." Fascinating gallery of abandoned buildings, including a library still containing many books, and a police station whose floor is littered with discarded mugshots.
Julien Temple's film Requiem For Detroit (http://rutube.ru/tracks/3971045.html?v=b291fb1f625e36b9863c25366e7bbda8) emphasises that astonishing desertion even more by mixing in the buzzing Motor City era, and Motown music, and Techno, and Hip-Hop... and then the city as it is now. Just an astonishing film. As someone commented on your link, "It looks like the end of the world."

[I'm not sure how legit the video site is. Found it on Google video search. It's a BBC film anyway, so we've paid for it, right?]

RichardCranium
15th February 2011, 08:30
Captured: The Ruins of Detroit (http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2011/02/07/captured-the-ruins-of-detroit/2672/):eek


When Soaps Die (http://www.offthetelly.co.uk/?page_id=44)Although not mentioned, that article reminded me of Triangle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_(TV_series)), surely the most depressing, miserable bits of telly ever produced? What were they thinking? I used to be a regular viewer: trying to determine what on earth it was people saw in it. I never did find out; presumably all its other viewers were doing the same as me.


People Who (http://peoplewho.us/):confused: I don't understand this web site. A series of boxes of text saying "People who <whatever>" which, when you click on them, takes you to a page with the PWHO logo, the text again and a list of who has blogged it. I'm clearly a phooquitte 'cos I don't get the joke.

d000hg
15th February 2011, 11:24
:confused: I don't understand this web site. A series of boxes of text saying "People who <whatever>" which, when you click on them, takes you to a page with the PWHO logo, the text again and a list of who has blogged it. I'm clearly a phooquitte 'cos I don't get the joke.It's a self indulgent listing of things he doesn't like, with an opportunity for people to boost his ego by commenting or "liking" on the posts. It's like moaning down the pub but more modern.

cailin maith
15th February 2011, 11:28
It's a self indulgent listing of things he doesn't like, with an opportunity for people to boost his ego by commenting or "liking" on the posts. It's like moaning down the pub but more modern.

Also very similar to the "Minor things that annoy me thread" :smile

NickFitz
15th February 2011, 12:45
Also very similar to everything in General :smile

FTFY ;)

Mich the Tester
15th February 2011, 12:57
I watched a prog on the box all about that.

The remaining inhabitants are busily removing anything of any value from the decaying remains, including iron girders supporting the roof etc.

Must be quite exciting in its way.

I suppose it'll keep the Americans coming to visit Europe's 'historic cities' seeing as they've neglected their own.

Mich the Tester
15th February 2011, 13:01
Brilliant;

http://www.seedetroit.com/music/brainwashed-america.gif

d000hg
15th February 2011, 17:00
I'm a bit confused by the Detroit one... ignorant as I am of US culture I don't 'get' it... according to Wikipedia Detroit is a major city. Opening myself for abuse, but I don't care!

amcdonald
15th February 2011, 17:10
I'm a bit confused by the Detroit one... ignorant as I am of US culture I don't 'get' it... according to Wikipedia Detroit is a major city. Opening myself for abuse, but I don't care!

It 'used' to be the center of car manufacturing in America, now it's tulipsville

RichardCranium
15th February 2011, 17:12
I'm a bit confused by the Detroit one... ignorant as I am of US culture I don't 'get' it... according to Wikipedia Detroit is a major city.It is hiding within that entry:


Consolidation during the 1950s, especially in the automobile sector, increased competition for jobs. The Twelfth Street riot in 1967, as well as court-ordered busing accelerated white flight from the city. Commensurate with the shift of population and jobs to its suburbs, the city's tax base eroded. In the years following, Detroit's population fell from a peak of roughly 1.8 million in 1950 to about half that number today.

The gasoline crises of 1973 and 1979 impacted the U.S. auto industry as small cars from foreign makers made inroads. Heroin and crack cocaine use afflicted the city with the influence of Butch Jones, Maserati Rick, and the Chambers Brothers. Renaissance has been a perennial buzzword among city leaders, reinforced by the construction of the Renaissance Center in the late 1970s. This complex of skyscrapers, designed as a city within a city, together with other developments, slowed and eventually began to reverse the trend of businesses leaving Downtown Detroit by the late 1990s.

By 1980, nearly three decades inadequate policies and crime had caused areas like the Elmhurst block to decay. During the 1980s, vacant structures were demolished to make way for redevelopment.

In the 1990s, the city began to receive a revival with much of it centered in the Downtown, Midtown, and New Center areas.

Some city limit signs, particularly on the Dearborn border say "Welcome to Detroit, The Renaissance City Founded 1701."

See also: The decline of Detroit (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/6346299.stm)

TimberWolf
15th February 2011, 17:42
It 'used' to be the center of car manufacturing in America, now it's tulipsville

Which bodes well for silicon valley. Or should I say Bobes valley.

amcdonald
15th February 2011, 18:38
Which bodes well for silicon valley. Or should I say Bobes valley.

They could always do boob jobs their instead, then when the IT goes to the far east they'd still have their silicon valley

OwlHoot
15th February 2011, 19:27
Although not mentioned, that article reminded me of Triangle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_(TV_series)), surely the most depressing, miserable bits of telly ever produced? What were they thinking? I used to be a regular viewer: trying to determine what on earth it was people saw in it. I never did find out; presumably all its other viewers were doing the same as me.

In the late 70s, or maybe early 80s, there was an espionage drama series that made Macbeth seem like a light hearted comedy.

Everyone, from the DG to the cleaner, suspected everyone else of being a mole, and all were bumped off one after the other, until I think the last two (one being the DG) shot each other, thus bringing the series to a neat end.

It's a wonder anyone applied to join MI5 (or was it MI6) for years afterwards. :eek

NickFitz
15th February 2011, 19:53
Although not mentioned, that article reminded me of Triangle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_(TV_series)), surely the most depressing, miserable bits of telly ever produced? What were they thinking?


The same site has an article about Triangle (http://www.offthetelly.co.uk/?page_id=212) - their server appears to be having problems at the moment, but you can also find it on the Wayback Machine (http://web.archive.org/web/20060814191108/offthetelly.co.uk/drama/triangle.htm) or in Google's cache (http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:mgq34Q09uhkJ:www.offthetelly.co.uk/%3Fpage_id%3D212+site:offthetelly.co.uk+triangle&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=uk&source=www.google.co.uk) :nerd

EDIT: a quote from the article:



At the end of the first series on April Fool’s Day W G Mather from Nottinghamshire felt moved to write to the Radio Times to comment that “one might have expected to see the captain handling docking or overseeing the pilot … Other possible episodes could have involved the engines, the problems of passengers, the loading/unloading of cars and cargo, union troubles, of general day-to-day problems such as fog, maydays and close misses.” ... W G Mather was perhaps a little misguided in his hopes that a new family serial would dwell on the actual minutiae of running a ferry service.

:rollin:

Spacecadet
15th February 2011, 20:11
Captured: The Ruins of Detroit (http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2011/02/07/captured-the-ruins-of-detroit/2672/) - "Up and down Detroit’s streets, buildings stand abandoned and in ruin. French photographers Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre set out to document the decline of an American city." Fascinating gallery of abandoned buildings, including a library still containing many books, and a police station whose floor is littered with discarded mugshots.


I like how the library looks like everything has been stolen, apart from the books

The entire place looks like it could be the setting for the next Fallout game