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Doggy Styles
17th February 2011, 18:34
Rush-hour traffic and crowded trains on my commute suggest more people in work than any time in the past three years.

My back-up measure of pub and restaurant usage supports this.

So is it mainly those in low-paid, non-commuting work who can't get jobs?

amcdonald
17th February 2011, 20:40
Ive noticed traffic lessen on my M25 commute, commuters into London from my local train station seem to be about the same though

OwlHoot
17th February 2011, 20:40
Rush-hour traffic and crowded trains on my commute suggest more people in work than any time in the past three years.

My back-up measure of pub and restaurant usage supports this.

So is it mainly those in low-paid, non-commuting work who can't get jobs?

Curious, my impression was the opposite.

My daily commute on the M4/M25/M3 (against prevailing traffic) was quieter than I remember it several years ago.

I guess "your mileage may vary", and everyone is trying to minimize theirs, what with the price of fuel.

CheeseSlice
17th February 2011, 23:26
Things wont be back to normal down here until the restaurants are more full mid-week than they are at the weekends. Town was always full of 'suits' on expenses around 2006/7.

It has improved, but its still been pretty :tumble: since the financial crisis

MarillionFan
17th February 2011, 23:36
WE...All of us are in the main growth industry in the UK.

Forecasts are showing there will be a 1M shortfall in IT resourcing in the next 5 years. There are not
enough youngsters coming through with IT skills. 1 in 5 under 24s are unemployed.

WE. US. YOU. ME! Are going to be the big winners in the next 5 years. IT professionals are going to be older and more skilled than those coming through.

From the 1st BBC computer, the first ZX spectrum
game you had published, the first Business Intelligence platform you got involved in!!! Pat yourself on the back. Because boys and girls you made the right decisions when it mattered, when it counted and when all us went to shit YOU have come out on Top!!!!!!!:yay::yay::yay:

Wodewick
17th February 2011, 23:38
WE...All of us are in the main growth industry in the UK.

Forecasts are showing there will be a 1M shortfall in IT resourcing in the next 5 years. There are not
enough youngsters coming through with IT skills. 1 in 5 under 24s are unemployed.

WE. US. YOU. ME! Are going to be the big winners in the next 5 years. IT professionals are going to be older and more skilled than those coming through.

From the 1st BBC computer, the first ZX spectrum
game you had published, the first Business Intelligence platform you got involved in!!! Pat yourself on the back. Because boys and girls you made the right decisions when it mattered, when it counted and when all us went to tulip YOU have come out on Top!!!!!!!:yay::yay::yay:

Wot you been drinking?

TimberWolf
17th February 2011, 23:39
WE...All of us are in the main growth industry in the UK.

Forecasts are showing there will be a 1M shortfall in IT resourcing in the next 5 years. There are not
enough youngsters coming through with IT skills. 1 in 5 under 24s are unemployed.

WE. US. YOU. ME! Are going to be the big winners in the next 5 years. IT professionals are going to be older and more skilled than those coming through.

From the 1st BBC computer, the first ZX spectrum
game you had published, the first Business Intelligence platform you got involved in!!! Pat yourself on the back. Because boys and girls you made the right decisions when it mattered, when it counted and when all us went to tulip YOU have come out on Top!!!!!!!:yay::yay::yay:

An awful lot of those unemployed are IT graduates - the worst degree subject to study at university as far as employment prospects go, bar none. For about 10 years running.

MarillionFan
17th February 2011, 23:43
Wot you been drinking?

Semillion Chardonay and watching Question time.

Wodewick
17th February 2011, 23:46
Semillion Chardonay and watching Question time.

Gotta hand it to you - You really know how to live!

MarillionFan
17th February 2011, 23:51
An awful lot of those unemployed are IT graduates - the worst degree subject to study at university as far as employment prospects go, bar none. For about 10 years running.

Timber. That's a subjective comment.

You need to back that up. IT is worse tha
Geography or Social Science is it?:ladybags::confused:

stek
17th February 2011, 23:55
Wot you been drinking?

Four tins of Tennetts Super and a bottle of Bucky...

I love Scotland, and I'm English!

Tennetts is sublime but the Bucky is definitely an acquired taste, tastes like wine with soap...

TimberWolf
17th February 2011, 23:57
Timber. That's a subjective comment.

You need to back that up. IT is worse tha
Geography or Social Science is it?:ladybags::confused:

Yes. Worst than medya studies, creative arts, the lot. I forget who publishes the statistics but I used to see them most years and IT graduates had the worst employment prospects of the lot, year after year. Labour all but destroyed IT in the UK.

Here's (http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2010/jul/15/employment-statistics-university-graduates) a dumbed down (i.e. the journalist has already done the leg work) of my first Google hit. I think I used to see them in Computing magazine.

The Higher Education Statistics Authority has published employment rates today by each university across the country - and by each subject. It makes gloomy reading for those studying computer science and IT - they have the lowest employment rate for any area of study (see the data below).

And their source: http://www.hesa.ac.uk/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1702&Itemid=141

MarillionFan
18th February 2011, 00:11
An awful lot of those unemployed are IT graduates - the worst degree subject to study at university as far as employment prospects go, bar none. For about 10 years running.

I will peruse tomorrow.

At a recent gig there was a graduate there. 1st job. £18k. Not happy.

My mates are on 25k, 30k it's so unfair. As it happens gig was a simple Crystal role. My rate 450 per day
and they were asking me to real basic stuff. So
I told the client I'd train the grad. I told the grad to
go and read a training manual and sit with me for a day.

Yeah, yeah, yeah. But if I learn it I want 25k.

Did he read it? No. Did he spend time with me? No. Even with a few days to go I offered. Did he take it? Course not.

University grads need to get real. They still have to
work hard after uni to get it.

TimberWolf
18th February 2011, 00:22
I will peruse tomorrow.

At a recent gig there was a graduate there. 1st job. £18k. Not happy.

My mates are on 25k, 30k it's so unfair. As it happens gig was a simple Crystal role. My rate 450 per day
and they were asking me to real basic stuff. So
I told the client I'd train the grad. I told the grad to
go and read a training manual and sit with me for a day.

Yeah, yeah, yeah. But if I learn it I want 25k.

Did he read it? No. Did he spend time with me? No. Even with a few days to go I offered. Did he take it? Course not.

University grads need to get real. They still have to
work hard after uni to get it.

Perhaps he knows his days are numbered until Bob either takes his job or drives his wages further below those of his university chums and realises it's not a career.

NorthWestPerm2Contr
18th February 2011, 10:55
Rush-hour traffic and crowded trains on my commute suggest more people in work than any time in the past three years.

My back-up measure of pub and restaurant usage supports this.

So is it mainly those in low-paid, non-commuting work who can't get jobs?

There is a very simple explanation for this:

People are now training it instead of using cars. Due to petrol prices and mileage costs it is now much cheaper. I travel first class from home to clientco every day and it's still cheaper than the diesel i'd have to fill my golf up with. And that's ignoring depreciation/maintenance/etc

This means roads are likely to be quieter but trains will be more busy - rush-hour traffic will always remain bad as whenever there is space somebody will be there to come and fill it since we don't have the 8 line highways they have in the US of A

sasguru
18th February 2011, 11:52
Yes. Worst than medya studies, creative arts, the lot. I forget who publishes the statistics but I used to see them most years and IT graduates had the worst employment prospects of the lot, year after year. Labour all but destroyed IT in the UK.

Here's (http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2010/jul/15/employment-statistics-university-graduates) a dumbed down (i.e. the journalist has already done the leg work) of my first Google hit. I think I used to see them in Computing magazine.


And their source: HESA - Higher Education Statistics Agency - PIs 2008/09: Employment of graduates (http://www.hesa.ac.uk/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1702&Itemid=141)

IT? What the fook is that?

I reckon that the unemployment rates for the Computer Science or Computer Systems Engineering or similar cohorts at UCL, Kings, Oxbridge or indeed the better redbricks will be pretty low.

On the other hamd if you have a "degree" in say "IT and business" or similar (and these will probably consititute the bulk of "IT" degrees) from Wolverhampton Poly, East London Poly or similar you might as well give up.

TimberWolf
18th February 2011, 12:12
IT? What the fook is that?

I reckon that the unemployment rates for the Computer Science or Computer Systems Engineering or similar cohorts at UCL, Kings, Oxbridge or indeed the better redbricks will be pretty low.

On the other hamd if you have a "degree" in say "IT and business" or similar (and these will probably consititute the bulk of "IT" degrees) from Wolverhampton Poly, East London Poly or similar you might as well give up.

I haven't looked at the raw data to drill down to employment prospects per study area per university. But given that Cambridge is 13th in a list sorted by employment prospects per university (click on the table heading given in my link to sort) for all subjects, there's nothing to suggest what you say is correct.

Freamon
18th February 2011, 13:00
IT? What the fook is that?

I reckon that the unemployment rates for the Computer Science or Computer Systems Engineering or similar cohorts at UCL, Kings, Oxbridge or indeed the better redbricks will be pretty low.

On the other hamd if you have a "degree" in say "IT and business" or similar (and these will probably consititute the bulk of "IT" degrees) from Wolverhampton Poly, East London Poly or similar you might as well give up.
One place I was at many years ago seemed to have employed their entire graduate intake from people who had done "Multimedia Computing" at University of Northumbria.

Doggy Styles
18th February 2011, 13:00
There is a very simple explanation for this:

People are now training it instead of using cars. Due to petrol prices and mileage costs it is now much cheaper. I travel first class from home to clientco every day and it's still cheaper than the diesel i'd have to fill my golf up with. And that's ignoring depreciation/maintenance/etc

This means roads are likely to be quieter but trains will be more busy - rush-hour traffic will always remain bad as whenever there is space somebody will be there to come and fill it since we don't have the 8 line highways they have in the US of AI did mention in the OP that rush-hour traffic was also up.

This is on a cross-country route between Dunstable and, er, Wycombe I suppose.

sasguru
18th February 2011, 13:54
I haven't looked at the raw data to drill down to employment prospects per study area per university. But given that Cambridge is 13th in a list sorted by employment prospects per university (click on the table heading given in my link to sort) for all subjects, there's nothing to suggest what you say is correct.

You really are as thick as two infinitely thick planks nailed together aren't you?

NorthWestPerm2Contr
18th February 2011, 14:02
I did mention in the OP that rush-hour traffic was also up.

This is on a cross-country route between Dunstable and, er, Wycombe I suppose.

And in my reply I did mention that Rush-Hour traffic will always be bad and get worse due to the lack of space on roads, not because of less unemployment.

Doggy Styles
18th February 2011, 16:41
And in my reply I did mention that Rush-Hour traffic will always be bad and get worse due to the lack of space on roads, not because of less unemployment.Ah yes, I appreciate that, but what I said was that the rush-hour traffic is up recently, which means it has got worse.

It got lighter for a year or two until about last November/December, but seems to have doubled since then. Well, it probably hasn't really doubled but it's significantly heavier.

That's only what I observe in my area.

So where are all those extra people going at that time of the morning and evening, if not to work?

Sockpuppet
18th February 2011, 19:13
Rush-hour traffic and crowded trains on my commute suggest more people in work than any time in the past three years.

My back-up measure of pub and restaurant usage supports this.

So is it mainly those in low-paid, non-commuting work who can't get jobs?

Or people are having to travel further to find what work there is.