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AtW
24th February 2011, 22:55
Resume

Pick up exactly where you left off.

If you’ve ever restarted your Mac, you know what’s involved. First you save your work, then close all your apps, then spend valuable time setting everything up again. With Resume, that time-consuming process is a thing of the past. Resume lets you restart your Mac — after a software update, for example — and return to what you were doing. With all your apps back in the exact places you left them. In fact, whenever you quit and relaunch an app, Resume opens it precisely the way you left it. So you never have to start from scratch again.*

Source: Apple - Mac OS X Lion (http://www.apple.com/macosx/lion/)

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Sounds great! Noticed that *? Well, right at the bottom of the source page in grey text they show this: "*Available with apps that have been developed to work with Lion." :rollin:

It would have been great feature if it worked with all apps without having to modify them - I am hoping the iPad 2 that will be out next week will be worth my money :eyes

NickFitz
25th February 2011, 00:59
It would have been great feature if it worked with all apps without having to modify them - I am hoping the iPad 2 that will be out next week will be worth my money :eyes

I know, how shoddy can you get, implementing a feature in a new operating system that requires software to be written to take advantage of the relevant API?

It's almost as shameful as the time Microsoft released Windows 95 yet all those MS-DOS 3.2 programs could still only be operated via a command line, or the bizarre circumstance that programs compiled for the PDP-8/e turned out to be unaware of the opcodes used by VAX CPUs :eyes

Ignis Fatuus
25th February 2011, 08:14
OTOH you don't actually have to restart your Mac as often as a PC.

Spacecadet
25th February 2011, 08:30
OTOH you don't actually have to restart your Mac as often as a PC.

depends on the updates
I recently noticed one of our SQL Server instances has been up since last June

As for my laptop (windows 7), I just use the sleep function and only restart for updates which need it

Sysman
25th February 2011, 09:49
Resume

Pick up exactly where you left off.

If you’ve ever restarted your Mac, you know what’s involved. First you save your work, then close all your apps, then spend valuable time setting everything up again.

To be honest it's not that bad even on my oldish Mac. I have things such as Mail and the calendar set to start automatically, and opening recent documents is just a couple of clicks away (via the Documents popup on the Dock).

On the hardware front the new MacBooks sport Thunderbolt (http://www.apple.com/thunderbolt/)


With 10 Gbps of throughput in both directions, Thunderbolt I/O technology lets you move data to and from peripherals up to 20 times faster than with USB 2.0 and more than 12 times faster than with FireWire 800. Two 10-Gbps channels on the same connector mean you can daisy-chain multiple high-speed devices and a display, without using a hub — and without reducing performance.

Goodbye Firewire. Goodbye USB 3.0?

Good news on the connectivity front too:


Thunderbolt also provides 10 watts of power to peripherals, so you can tackle workstation-class projects on the go. With PCI Express technology, you can use existing USB and FireWire peripherals — even connect to Gigabit Ethernet and Fibre Channel networks — using simple adapters.

And because Thunderbolt is based on DisplayPort technology, the video standard for high-resolution displays, any Mini DisplayPort display plugs right into the Thunderbolt port. To connect a DisplayPort, DVI, HDMI, or VGA display, just use an existing adapter.

Sysman
25th February 2011, 09:58
OTOH you don't actually have to restart your Mac as often as a PC.

A perfect example is an Adobe Reader upgrade demanding a Windows reboot. That really shouldn't be necessary.

OS X updates typically only require a reboot if they affect system components and/or address security issues.

Spacecadet
25th February 2011, 10:12
To be honest it's not that bad even on my oldish Mac. I have things such as Mail and the calendar set to start automatically, and opening recent documents is just a couple of clicks away (via the Documents popup on the Dock).

On the hardware front the new MacBooks sport Thunderbolt (http://www.apple.com/thunderbolt/)

Goodbye Firewire. Goodbye USB 3.0?

Good news on the connectivity front too:

Thunderbolt: A new way to hack Macs ? The Register (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/02/24/thunderbolt_mac_threat/)

VectraMan
25th February 2011, 10:28
A perfect example is an Adobe Reader upgrade demanding a Windows reboot. That really shouldn't be necessary.

Windows application updates only usually require a reboot if that software is running. I assume that's the case with Adobe Reader.

I always strategically update when it suits me. I can't understand all the people that moan about Windows needing reboots when they've set it to do that.

Spacecadet
25th February 2011, 10:41
A perfect example is an Adobe Reader upgrade demanding a Windows reboot. That really shouldn't be necessary.


I'm sure lots of applications do a reboot on update out of laziness - the developers can't be arsed checking if one is necessary so just do it by default.

That's all beside the point though, why are you using adobe just to read PDFs?

You want to use the foxit pdf reader:
Foxit Software - Foxit Reader for Windows (http://www.foxitsoftware.com/pdf/reader/reader4.php)

Much lighter and faster

DaveB
25th February 2011, 10:45
To be honest it's not that bad even on my oldish Mac. I have things such as Mail and the calendar set to start automatically, and opening recent documents is just a couple of clicks away (via the Documents popup on the Dock).



TBH I'm in the habit of closing everything and shutting down anyway. Years of working in clear desk / clear screen environments.

My iMac is 5 or 6 years old now and and from a cold start it's ready to go in about 15 secs.

Sysman
25th February 2011, 10:51
Windows application updates only usually require a reboot if that software is running. I assume that's the case with Adobe Reader.

I always strategically update when it suits me. I can't understand all the people that moan about Windows needing reboots when they've set it to do that.

Locked down PC at work, I'm afraid.

Sysman
25th February 2011, 11:07
Thunderbolt: A new way to hack Macs ? The Register (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/02/24/thunderbolt_mac_threat/)

Have you read the reader comments (http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2011/02/24/thunderbolt_mac_threat/)?

As ever, physical access beats all, a good example being this Register article (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/02/11/contracting_internet/) from a couple of weeks ago, where an enterprising contractor beat the network nazis using his own kit:


Fortunately, I had a netbook and my HTC Desire. I set my Desire up as a Wi-Fi hotspot to share its internet connection with my netbook. I set the netbook up as a router and bridged its wired and wireless network connections. A quick change on the target computer to use the netbook as the internet gateway and suddenly I had access to Technet.

Had there been more than two computers to worry about, I would have set up a small HTTP server on my phone, downloaded the ISO to my phone and served it up from there. As it is, this solution cost me only about 500MB of my 5GB plan.

I had bookmarked this article as a reminder to avoid fixed price quotes for such work:


In the end, it took me three-and-a-half hours to work around all the security in place enough to do the simple job I was asked to do. I love a challenge; they are the fun part of this job. Still, the lack of organization and preparation on the client’s part cost them. I was there easily three times as long as should have been required.

Sysman
25th February 2011, 11:20
I'm sure lots of applications do a reboot on update out of laziness - the developers can't be arsed checking if one is necessary so just do it by default.

That's all beside the point though, why are you using adobe just to read PDFs?

You want to use the foxit pdf reader:
Foxit Software - Foxit Reader for Windows (http://www.foxitsoftware.com/pdf/reader/reader4.php)

Much lighter and faster

I do use Foxit on my own Windows systems, and Preview on my Macs. I sacked Adobe Reader several years ago for personal use.


TBH I'm in the habit of closing everything and shutting down anyway. Years of working in clear desk / clear screen environments.

My iMac is 5 or 6 years old now and and from a cold start it's ready to go in about 15 secs.

Yes, I've done the clear desk / screen thing too. On slow kit it's simply a matter of grabbing a coffee while the system is whirring into life.

NotAllThere
25th February 2011, 12:16
I used FoxIt for a while. But the nag screens annoyed me as much as Adobe's continual updates and bloatware.

Now I use notepad. :freaky:

stek
25th February 2011, 12:40
There's a developer preview of OSX 10.7 Lion now downloadable from Apple's Dev site - need a dev account tho.

Or peruse the usual sources!

Gonna try it later....

Sysman
25th February 2011, 12:48
I used FoxIt for a while. But the nag screens annoyed me as much as Adobe's continual updates and bloatware.

Now I use notepad. :freaky:

I haven't noticed the nag screens too much. You do need to concentrate when installing though, as by default it will make Ask your default search engine, add an Ask toolbar, add a shortcut to ebay and enable "safe reading mode". The last item is a real pain when trying to read a document containing URLs.

I said no to the lot :D

Spacecadet
25th February 2011, 13:07
I used FoxIt for a while. But the nag screens annoyed me as much as Adobe's continual updates and bloatware.

Now I use notepad. :freaky:

can't say I've ever seen a nag screen in foxit

d000hg
25th February 2011, 15:43
OTOH you don't actually have to restart your Mac as often as a PC.That sounds like crap to me. I normally hibernate my PC and it updates Adobe, Java, etc just fine. Only certain Windows updates require restarts and I find the Mac updates are no different. The only time I restarted in recent memory was to change the graphics card.

Doggy Styles
25th February 2011, 16:35
The only time I restarted in recent memory was to change the graphics card.I've heard you don't need to restart a Mac for that. :D

Sysman
25th February 2011, 17:44
That sounds like crap to me. I normally hibernate my PC and it updates Adobe, Java, etc just fine. Only certain Windows updates require restarts and I find the Mac updates are no different. The only time I restarted in recent memory was to change the graphics card.

Do you run as a privileged user?

I suspect Spacecadet hit the nail on the head here:


I'm sure lots of applications do a reboot on update out of laziness - the developers can't be arsed checking if one is necessary so just do it by default.

which rather reminds me of the apps I used to get a dozen years ago. Kept knocking them back because the installation packages didn't bother setting file ownership and protections properly. Of course running the result in a privileged account worked, but it was my job to ensure that end users could run this stuff without elevated privileges.

d000hg
25th February 2011, 17:50
I've heard you don't need to restart a Mac for that. :DApple don't let you change your graphics card, so problem solved.

stek
25th February 2011, 18:28
Apple don't let you change your graphics card, so problem solved.

I can on my PowerMac.

Also on this iMac, in theory! It's certainly detachable.

d000hg
25th February 2011, 18:57
I can on my PowerMac.

Also on this iMac, in theory! It's certainly detachable.It was a joke... though on a serious note do they have an official list of "authorised Mac cards" or can you safely bung anything in?

stek
25th February 2011, 18:59
It was a joke... though on a serious note do they have an official list of "authorised Mac cards" or can you safely bung anything in?

They have to have a Mac ROM - it is possible to reflash some PC cards. Tried it once and buggered the card....

AtW
25th February 2011, 20:09
They have to have a Mac ROM - it is possible to reflash some PC cards.

:rollin:

Going to buy an iPad 2 - I already feel that Apple will own me :frown

Cliphead
25th February 2011, 20:15
:rollin:

Going to buy an iPad 2 - I already feel that Apple will own me :frown

I'll go for a Motorola Xoom when it hits these shores.

d000hg
25th February 2011, 20:21
:rollin:

Going to buy an iPad 2 - I already feel that Apple will own me :frownWhat's wrong with getting iPad 1 once the prices drop when 2 is released?

TimberWolf
25th February 2011, 20:25
I've got an iPad 0.1 - an iPod Touch - and I must say I'm still happy with it a year on. It does "just work". Battery life is a bit naff though.