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Mich the Tester
16th March 2011, 10:45
From the torygraph's live coverage of the Japan disaster;


A British rescue team said it has been prevented from travelling to the disaster zone in Japan because the embassy in Tokyo refused to issue the necessary documentation.

Willie McMartin, from the International Rescue Corps, said a team of 12 volunteers had been give permission by the Japanese embassy in London to join the rescue effort in the north of the country.

But when they arrived in Tokyo, they were unable to get any further because the British Embassy would not give them the papers they needed.

Foreign Office Minister Alistair Burt said he would look into what had happened.

"I will see what the situation is in relation to Mr McMartin's case and we will get an answer extremely quickly

FFS. (sorry, can't think of anything more to say about that)

GreenLabel
16th March 2011, 10:50
FFS. (sorry, can't think of anything more to say about that)

Tar. Feathers. Some assembly required.

ctdctd
16th March 2011, 10:57
They should really start publicly sacking Bureaucratic tw*ts when they do things like that.

TykeMerc
16th March 2011, 11:37
They should really start publicly sacking Bureaucratic tw*ts when they do things like that.

Fair comment.

landl
16th March 2011, 11:39
They should really start publicly sacking Bureaucratic tw*ts when they do things like that.

+1

MaryPoppins
16th March 2011, 11:46
Saw this on the news earlier. Only, I couldn't quite get a grasp of what the story was - they have the BBC News channel on mute here, with some knobber typing the subtitles with his feet by the looks of it.

I bet whoever it was who refused to provide the documentation, used to work as a doctor's receptionist.

landl
16th March 2011, 12:13
Saw this on the news earlier. Only, I couldn't quite get a grasp of what the story was - they have the BBC News channel on mute here, with some spazzer typing the subtitles with his feet by the looks of it.

I bet whoever it was who refused to provide the documentation, used to work as a doctor's receptionist.

I would like to point out that I find the term spazzer deeply offensive. I've always preferred "Joey" or, more recently, "window licker".

Thank you.

MaryPoppins
16th March 2011, 12:20
I would like to point out that I find the term spazzer deeply offensive. I've always preferred "Joey" or, more recently, "window licker".

Thank you.

Spazzer is quite offensive actually. I will remove it

landl
16th March 2011, 12:26
Spazzer is quite offensive actually. I will remove it

Now you've made me feel guilty about my post. I'll qualify that when I use the expressions, it's done with affection.

Board Game Geek
16th March 2011, 13:15
After moving to a new town and making new friends, some of whom are disabled, I was shocked that they refer to themselves as "Crips".

As a fellow disabled person myself, it took a while to get in to their thinking, but essentially, they are claiming it back for their own. (If anyone has seen Clerks II, remember the porch monkey routine ?)

A lot of it has come from the more militant members of the community, who are fed up with ever-constantly changing labels whilst people try and pussy-foot around us and not offend us. So basically, we're saying (or at least our group is saying), chill out, we're crips, we're happy with the term, use it. TBH, to see the look of confusion on normal folks faces is worth it sometimes.

But there is something more important at stake, and the real point being that in the never-ending PC climate of fear which is constantly unsettling and threatening people, ever-changing labels means an ever-changing identity, and we feel that this in itself makes us invisible. We are dehumanised by the lack of identification.

So, crips we are, and we even have our own crips club for members and their families. The identification and following association really does bring us together.

Check out Liz Carr who is bit of hero in the crip community.


Next up was Liz Carr, a wheelchair user whose brand of comedy is edgy and almost uncomfortable. She talks of ‘spazzing up’ and delivers some filthy material that makes no secret of the fact disabled people are as sexually motivated as the rest of us. Some comedy was, perhaps, sacrificed for point-making, but the laughs still came solidly from this honest, uncompromising set.”

Chortle 4 star review of Abnormally Funny People at Edinburgh Fringe Festival 2005


Liz Carr is the dark and dangerous heart of the Abs, and improves with every performance. Tonight she is smooth, and bristling with confidence, with each gag narrated in her inimitable gobby, cynical style. There are no sacred cows here, no impairment is safe, and no crip scenario that cannot be held up for examination and shared laughter.”

Penny Pepper reviewing Abnormally Funny People for DAIL


“Liz Carr is a stand-up who can barely stand up, so from her motorised wheelchair delivers a set revolving around her disability and reactions to it – an entirely understandable obsession. She’s got bags of attitude – provocatively referring to herself as a ‘crip’, for instance – and a confidence in her delivery, even if the quality of the material is variable. But, to put it bluntly, she’s got one hell of an angle, and the right approach to talking about it. Compared to that, polishing the gags should only be a matter of time.”

Steve Bennett, Chortle


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHIcKDV7Trw&feature=related

and another great comedian, Josh Blue


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gT9-VNOTJa4

MaryPoppins
16th March 2011, 13:21
After moving to a new town and making new friends, some of whom are disabled, I was shocked that they refer to themselves as "Crips".

As a fellow disabled person myself, it took a while to get in to their thinking, but essentially, they are claiming it back for their own. (If anyone has seen Clerks II, remember the porch monkey routine ?)

A lot of it has come from the more militant members of the community, who are fed up with ever-constantly changing labels whilst people try and pussy-foot around us and not offend us. So basically, we're saying (or at least our group is saying), chill out, we're crips, we're happy with the term, use it. TBH, to see the look of confusion on normal folks faces is worth it sometimes.


There's PC labels, then I guess there's the offensive ones such as the one I splodged out.

Crips it is from now on though.

Board Game Geek
16th March 2011, 13:30
There's PC labels, then I guess there's the offensive ones such as the one I splodged out.

Crips it is from now on though.

Cheers MP !

:hug:

Old Greg
16th March 2011, 13:32
They should really start publicly sacking Bureaucratic tw*ts when they do things like that.

Then they can't win, can they? Sacked if they don't help and if they do, it's more that their job's worth.

FiveTimes
16th March 2011, 13:44
There's PC labels, then I guess there's the offensive ones such as the one I splodged out.

Crips it is from now on though.

I've heard the phrase cripple creek when referring to the parking bays at the supermarket but never dared call anyone a crip.

Churchill
16th March 2011, 13:54
From the torygraph's live coverage of the Japan disaster;



FFS. (sorry, can't think of anything more to say about that)

Why bother saying anything until the facts of the matter are known?

As for BGG's comment, "Crip"? Nah mate, why bother with a label anyway, that applies descrimination. Just like non-whites referring to each other as "*******", unnecessary and in my book unacceptable.

The "*******" represents a colloquial term for Negroes, bloody spell check.

suityou01
16th March 2011, 13:57
Cheers MP !

:hug:

So for clarity if "crip" refers to someone in a wheelchair (or disabled person), does spazzer still mean numpty of the highest order? :confused:

cailin maith
16th March 2011, 14:00
I've heard the phrase cripple creek when referring to the parking bays at the supermarket but never dared call anyone a crip.

Or me... :eek

I think it'd be quite rude. I do use spaz every now and again :o somehow it seems less offensive than crip.

But I prefer "fu<ker" - it's my go to swear word.

Along with "oh shit" which I used in front of an 18 month old at the weekend and he promptly used it himself :D

EternalOptimist
16th March 2011, 14:00
Why bother saying anything until the facts of the matter are known?

As for BGG's comment, "Crip"? Nah mate, why bother with a label anyway, that applies descrimination. Just like non-whites referring to each other as "*******", unnecessary and in my book unacceptable.

Thats nothing, I went to school in Liverpool with a guy who had learning difficulties, a white mum and a black dad, and he started robbing with a machete when he was about twelve.
So we might have called him A n***** crip mofo,bin-dipping calm-down, calm down gangsta,
but we called him Pongo instead




:rolleyes:

SueEllen
16th March 2011, 14:00
Then they can't win, can they? Sacked if they don't help and if they do, it's more that their job's worth.

They can help.

They just need to know who to talk to higher up and how to interpret the rules - English is a funny language.

cailin maith
16th March 2011, 14:00
Thats nothing, I went to school in Liverpool with a guy who had learning difficulties, a white mum and a black dad, and he started robbing with a machete when he was about twelve.
So we might have called him A n***** crip mofo,bin-dipping calm-down, calm down gangsta,
but we called him Pongo instead




:rolleyes:

:laugh

Churchill
16th March 2011, 14:04
Thats nothing, I went to school in Liverpool with a guy who had learning difficulties, a white mum and a black dad, and he started robbing with a machete when he was about twelve.
So we might have called him A n***** crip mofo,bin-dipping calm-down, calm down gangsta,
but we called him Pongo instead

:rolleyes:

My point exactly. All be it more eloquently put.

MaryPoppins
16th March 2011, 14:09
Or me... :eek

I think it'd be quite rude. I do use spaz every now and again :o somehow it seems less offensive than crip.

But I prefer "fu<ker" - it's my go to swear word.

Along with "oh tulip" which I used in front of an 18 month old at the weekend and he promptly used it himself :D

:laugh

My (now swearing) son is 20 months old actually. :wink

cailin maith
16th March 2011, 14:11
:laugh

My (now swearing) son is 20 months old actually. :wink

:laugh Oh right... he's kinda short for 20 months :wink

Churchill
16th March 2011, 14:18
:laugh

My (now swearing) son is 20 months old actually. :wink


:laugh Oh right... he's kinda short for 20 months :wink

At least he didn't break my PS3 :wink and he tidied up the remote controls.

MaryPoppins
16th March 2011, 14:18
:laugh Oh right... he's kinda short for 20 months :wink

Yep. A bolshy, swearing, midget.

Like mother like son!

2BIT
16th March 2011, 14:27
I bet whoever it was who refused to provide the documentation, used to work as a doctor's receptionist.

that made me laugh! I could write a 12-volume tirade on that very subject and I rarely have to go, my mate's dad collapsed once (alcohol issues) prompting my mate to run down to the surgery (had already called ambulance) to try and get his dad some immediate attention, the battle axes on reception called the cops when my mate became exasperated with them as they refused to even contact a doctor in one of the offices, I don't think he got nicked but was too late for his dad.

I've changed surgery but the new place has a similar policy of obstinate and unhelpful receptionists.

MaryPoppins
16th March 2011, 14:37
that made me laugh! I could write a 12-volume tirade on that very subject and I rarely have to go, my mate's dad collapsed once (alcohol issues) prompting my mate to run down to the surgery (had already called ambulance) to try and get his dad some immediate attention, the battle axes on reception called the cops when my mate became exasperated with them as they refused to even contact a doctor in one of the offices, I don't think he got nicked but was too late for his dad.

I've changed surgery but the new place has a similar policy of obstinate and unhelpful receptionists.

Whores from Hell, the lot of them.

I like this conversation the best:

<after being on hold for around two years>
MP: Hello, can I book an emergency appointment with the doctor, please?
WfH: No. You need to call between eight and eight thirty to get an emergency appointment.
MP: I've been on hold since 08:17?
WfH: As it's now 08:31 I'm unable to help you. Please call back tomorrow between the hours of eight and eight thirty.
MP: But, I've been trying all week and I always get put on hold for ages.
WfH: It's luck of the draw I'm afraid. You need to come to the surgery and wait for the chance of an on the spot appointment between 3pm and 6pm.

Followed by the following, at 3pm:

MP: Hello, I've been told to come and wait for an on the spot emergency appointment.
WfH: Fine. Give me your mobile number and we will call you when we have an appointment available. You are not able to wait in the surgery waiting room though. You need to go outside.
MP: Erm, it's snowing - and my son is ill. Can we wait in here, please?
WfH: No. Do you have a car? Go and sit in it.

Churchill
16th March 2011, 14:41
Whores from Hell, the lot of them.

I like this conversation the best:

<after being on hold for around two years>
MP: Hello, can I book an emergency appointment with the doctor, please?
WfH: No. You need to call between eight and eight thirty to get an emergency appointment.
MP: I've been on hold since 08:17?
WfH: As it's now 08:31 I'm unable to help you. Please call back tomorrow between the hours of eight and eight thirty.
MP: But, I've been trying all week and I always get put on hold for ages.
WfH: It's luck of the draw I'm afraid. You need to come to the surgery and wait for the chance of an on the spot appointment between 3pm and 6pm.

Followed by the following, at 3pm:

MP: Hello, I've been told to come and wait for an on the spot emergency appointment.
WfH: Fine. Give me your mobile number and we will call you when we have an appointment available. You are not able to wait in the surgery waiting room though. You need to go outside.
MP: Erm, it's snowing - and my son is ill. Can we wait in here, please?
WfH: No. Do you have a car? Go and sit in it.

What the *****? Is that true?

2BIT
16th March 2011, 14:45
Whores from Hell, the lot of them.

I like this conversation the best:

<after being on hold for around two years>
MP: Hello, can I book an emergency appointment with the doctor, please?
WfH: No. You need to call between eight and eight thirty to get an emergency appointment.
MP: I've been on hold since 08:17?
WfH: As it's now 08:31 I'm unable to help you. Please call back tomorrow between the hours of eight and eight thirty.
MP: But, I've been trying all week and I always get put on hold for ages.
WfH: It's luck of the draw I'm afraid. You need to come to the surgery and wait for the chance of an on the spot appointment between 3pm and 6pm.

Followed by the following, at 3pm:

MP: Hello, I've been told to come and wait for an on the spot emergency appointment.
WfH: Fine. Give me your mobile number and we will call you when we have an appointment available. You are not able to wait in the surgery waiting room though. You need to go outside.
MP: Erm, it's snowing - and my son is ill. Can we wait in here, please?
WfH: No. Do you have a car? Go and sit in it.


I would say unbelievable but sadly it is totally believable, when I started the new place it took over two weeks to get a prescription fulfilled, I had run out of meds 2 weeks before so had no meds for 4 weeks - seriously considering Bupa just never ill enough

cailin maith
16th March 2011, 14:54
Whores from Hell, the lot of them.

I like this conversation the best:

<after being on hold for around two years>
MP: Hello, can I book an emergency appointment with the doctor, please?
WfH: No. You need to call between eight and eight thirty to get an emergency appointment.
MP: I've been on hold since 08:17?
WfH: As it's now 08:31 I'm unable to help you. Please call back tomorrow between the hours of eight and eight thirty.
MP: But, I've been trying all week and I always get put on hold for ages.
WfH: It's luck of the draw I'm afraid. You need to come to the surgery and wait for the chance of an on the spot appointment between 3pm and 6pm.

Followed by the following, at 3pm:

MP: Hello, I've been told to come and wait for an on the spot emergency appointment.
WfH: Fine. Give me your mobile number and we will call you when we have an appointment available. You are not able to wait in the surgery waiting room though. You need to go outside.
MP: Erm, it's snowing - and my son is ill. Can we wait in here, please?
WfH: No. Do you have a car? Go and sit in it.

All Dr's receptionists are the same :laugh

My conversations are usually like this

Me - Can I see the Dr please
Them - Why
Me - Cos I'm sick
Them - Well, how sick are you?
:tantrum:

Then when you finally see the Dr -

Them - Why didn't you come in earlier
Me - Cos the God damn rotweiller on the desk stopped me
Them - Oh, take no notice of her

MarillionFan
16th March 2011, 15:12
My surgery is like

'Hi can I get an appointment?'
'Is it an emergency?''

a) Yes - In that case come up in 30 minutes
b) No. In that case, this afternoon or tomorrow do you?

Now the dentist. Don't get me started on the dentist!!!

2BIT
16th March 2011, 15:17
All Dr's receptionists are the same :laugh

My conversations are usually like this

Me - Can I see the Dr please
Them - Why
Me - Cos I'm sick
Them - Well, how sick are you?
:tantrum:

Then when you finally see the Dr -

Them - Why didn't you come in earlier
Me - Cos the God damn rotweiller on the desk stopped me
Them - Oh, take no notice of her

best thing to do is to lie to the receptionist each time, then when you go into the docs and they say 'ah so you have a ruptured ligament' you can say 'what?! no I have bad guts' - do this enough times and the doctor may lose all confidence in what the receptionist says :D

cailin maith
16th March 2011, 15:23
My surgery is like

'Hi can I get an appointment?'
'Is it an emergency?''

a) Yes - In that case come up in 30 minutes
b) No. In that case, this afternoon or tomorrow do you?

Now the dentist. Don't get me started on the dentist!!!

My old Dr's used to be like that :( Dr was great. But since we moved, we are out of their area so have to have one closer. It's shitty.

TheFaQQer
16th March 2011, 16:12
Last time I rang the doctor, I expected to have to be triaged first before getting an appointment (Monday morning). Instead, she offered me 910 the same morning.

I was right up for an argument, too.

TheFaQQer
16th March 2011, 16:13
I would say unbelievable but sadly it is totally believable, when I started the new place it took over two weeks to get a prescription fulfilled, I had run out of meds 2 weeks before so had no meds for 4 weeks - seriously considering Bupa just never ill enough

BUPA ain't going to help that situation at all - you generally need to get a referral from your doctor before they will pay for any treatment. And a private prescription isn't cheap, either.

mudskipper
16th March 2011, 16:16
Yep - I don't see why I should have to tell the receptionist what is wrong with me in order to see the doctor. I won't do it any more - when they ask what's wrong with me I tell them I'll happily discuss it with a medically qualified person.

Churchill
16th March 2011, 16:57
Yep - I don't see why I should have to tell the receptionist what is wrong with me in order to see the doctor. I won't do it any more - when they ask what's wrong with me I tell them I'll happily discuss it with a medically qualified person.

Just tell the receptionist that you don't know and that is why you need to see the Doctor.

MaryPoppins
16th March 2011, 19:10
Yep - I don't see why I should have to tell the receptionist what is wrong with me in order to see the doctor. I won't do it any more - when they ask what's wrong with me I tell them I'll happily discuss it with a medically qualified person.

This is a new thing, isn't it. Baffling.

The receptionist at my old docs recently'forgot' to send a hospital referral for my son.

When I made my 7th call to ask what had happened with the referral and discovered the 'error', I turned the car round and drove 60 miles to terrorise the whoron face to face.

2BIT
16th March 2011, 19:16
This is a new thing, isn't it. Baffling.

The receptionist at my old docs recently'forgot' to send a hospital referral for my son.

When I made my 7th call to ask what had happened with the referral and discovered the 'error', I turned the car round and drove 60 miles to terrorise the whoron face to face.

problem is with lynch-pin staff like that is I'm afraid to upset them in case they make things difficult for me in the future, peoples in roles I tend to be nice to are receptionists, security guards, payroll, expenses, waiters, bouncers, traffic coppers, IT Depts - anyone who may possibly abuse what little power they have

i think if it was to do with kids I probably would be the same as you but otherwise would have just bottled the rage up inside me

norrahe
16th March 2011, 19:22
Our local surgery seems to specialise in having rude receptionists who never seem to haven't any appointments available, the doctors don't seem to give a carp and seem to reach for the prescription book before you sit down.

Some doctors even if you have private medical cover will still kick up a fuss if you want a referral to a private consultant.

MaryPoppins
16th March 2011, 19:25
problem is with lynch-pin staff like that is I'm afraid to upset them in case they make things difficult for me in the future, peoples in roles I tend to be nice to are receptionists, security guards, payroll, expenses, waiters, bouncers, traffic coppers, IT Depts - anyone who may possibly abuse what little power they have

i think if it was to do with kids I probably would be the same as you but otherwise would have just bottled the rage up inside me

Oh no. No - you need to show these little Hitler's that you mean business. I am in the process of making an official complaint about it actually, but mainly cos it was so serious. I'd normally be happy just to verbally tear her a new bottom hole.



I've changed docs now because obviously I'm too scared to go back.

Pogle
16th March 2011, 20:13
Oh no. No - you need to show these little Hitler's that you mean business. I am in the process of making an official complaint about it actually, but mainly cos it was so serious. I'd normally be happy just to verbally tear her a new bottom hole.



I've changed docs now because obviously I'm too scared to go back.

Cripes there are some dodgy Doctors surgeries round here :eek:
i have to say, mine is great and the receptionists are very good.

cailin maith
16th March 2011, 20:14
Oh no. No - you need to show these little Hitler's that you mean business. I am in the process of making an official complaint about it actually, but mainly cos it was so serious. I'd normally be happy just to verbally tear her a new bottom hole.



I've changed docs now because obviously I'm too scared to go back.

:rollin:

2BIT
16th March 2011, 20:27
Oh no. No - you need to show these little Hitler's that you mean business. I am in the process of making an official complaint about it actually, but mainly cos it was so serious. I'd normally be happy just to verbally tear her a new bottom hole.



I've changed docs now because obviously I'm too scared to go back.

that made me laugh out loud, agreed there's no messing around when it comes to kids (luckily I don't have any)

Board Game Geek
16th March 2011, 23:33
Yep - I don't see why I should have to tell the receptionist what is wrong with me in order to see the doctor. I won't do it any more - when they ask what's wrong with me I tell them I'll happily discuss it with a medically qualified person.

Having worked in 60+ surgeries over 5 years, and knowing the staff in each surgery on a first name basis, I hope I can offer some genuine insight in to some of the comments made in this thread.

1. Receptionists ask what is wrong with you, not because they are nosey, but because each day a surgery only has a limited amount of slots to offer patients. Surgeries have finite resources and GP's / rooms, and demand always outstrips supply. Hence, the need to prioritise slots and offer them to the most needy.

Whilst a receptionist is not a trained medical practitioner, they do have working knowledge of what to look out for, and will prioritise accordingly. To do that, they need to ask. Believe me, no one likes to be awkward on purpose, and get shouted at by rude patients, but there are reasons for asking as explained previously.

2. Rightly or wrongly, the "patient and GP consulting time" has been dropping for years, again to meet the needs of demands. Hence, a typical consultation is expected to last no more than 8 minutes, and should involve one medical problem.

Unfortunately, the reasons a lot of appointments over run, and you can be 30-40 minutes behind schedule is that patient A goes in with a list of complaints, patient B does the same, patient C has a single complaint, patient D has saved up 4 complaints, and it just cascades out of hand for the rest of that surgery.

3. DNA's (Did Not Attend). Every surgery suffers from DNA's, where a patient books an appointment, then does not show for the appointment, essentially wasting the time of the GP and denying the appointment to someone who would have attended. To give you an indication of how endemic this is, one of my surgeries posts monthly DNA's in the waiting room. They have 6 GP's and have about 200 appointments a day in total, or 1000 a week or 4400 a month.
Here are the figures again, but with DNA's in ( )

200 day (40-60), or 1000 (200-300) a week or 4400 (880 - 1320)

One month I saw the DNA monthly total at 1750

I believe these figures would be even higher if the receptionists did not ask people what their medical complaint was.

You'd be surprised the amount of "worried well" that exist out there, and just want a chat and some reassurance that everything is ok, and get themselves all worked up that they need a doctor's appointment and they must have it NOW, and that it is Really Important.

Sure, some are, and where kiddies are involved, extra care needs to be taken, but there are still some patients who abuse the system, treat the staff like 5hit, and expect the Dr. to appear when they click their fingers. These ones can ruin things for others.

4. Next time you ring your surgery, spare a thought for the receptionist, who's already been shouted at, abused, argued with and treated like a senile old bat. She's undoubtedly had only a few days training (if at all) on the new booking system that went in last week, probably never had any general training at all on the overall computer system (like how to turn it on, as Practice Manager's often do that for their staff and doctors), get's paid just above nat min wage, and might have to deal with arrogant doctors in to the bargain. She's probably also nearing retirement age herself, and has her own medical problems.

But hey, if it makes you feel better, go ahead and shout at her, because she's only being awkward for the fun of it, right ?

Wodewick
16th March 2011, 23:49
Quite a lot of pretty well argued stuff

..... you are of course right in much of what you say BUT:
I try pretty hard not to bother Doctors with trivial stuff and generally don't go to a surgery more than once every couple of years.
Added to the standard contractor aversion to losing money this means that when I attempt to go to a Doctors it is because if I am not, strictly speaking, approaching deaths door I am at the very least bloody ill. After all my effort to not waste this scarce resource I do think I deserve better than having to run the gauntlet of interference and blocking described above plus, once finally through these defences, I should warant a bit more than a cursary prod and be ushered out of the door within 5.74 minutes!

Board Game Geek
17th March 2011, 00:08
..... you are of course right in much of what you say BUT:
I try pretty hard not to bother Doctors with trivial stuff and generally don't go to a surgery more than once every couple of years.

Added to the standard contractor aversion to losing money this means that when I attempt to go to a Doctors it is because if I am not, strictly speaking, approaching deaths door I am at the very least bloody ill.

After all my effort to not waste this scarce resource I do think I deserve better than having to run the gauntlet of interference and blocking described above plus, once finally through these defences, I should warant a bit more than a cursary prod and be ushered out of the door within 5.74 minutes!

I appreciate your comment, but whilst you might have your own reasons for acting altruistically, not going for trivial reasons, etc, one thing you may not have considered is that the receptionist would not be aware of your selfless code.

Even if she could be made aware, she's not going to show favourtism because of your self-imposed self-sacrifice.

If you want deference and sycophants, book in to a Harley Street private practice.

As you say yourself, as you've avoided the docs for so long to save money, surely you can afford extra care and attention more suitable to your personal needs ?

I don't really feel you are in a claimable position to expect enhanced personally-tailored services from the National Health Service which strives to be equal for all.

MarillionFan
17th March 2011, 00:16
My old mum was the local sister at her surgery. I used to wait in reception day after day after school, talking to the reception staff and waiting for her to finish and take me home.

Never really noticed waiting in the doctors surgery. It's never on time, never. But as BGG says, it always runs over and if you treat them with respect then they're more likely to help.

If someone was properly ill/hurt , I'd go to A&E anyway. Wouldn't even bother with the doctors.

Board Game Geek
17th March 2011, 01:35
My old mum was the local sister at her surgery. I used to wait in reception day after day after school, talking to the reception staff and waiting for her to finish and take me home.

Never really noticed waiting in the doctors surgery. It's never on time, never. But as BGG says, it always runs over and if you treat them with respect then they're more likely to help.

If someone was properly ill/hurt , I'd go to A&E anyway. Wouldn't even bother with the doctors.

Indeed !

I did walk in to one site, after they had closed for lunch, where they were mopping the tiled floor in the waiting room, which was awash with blood.

I asked what had happened.

Apparently an elderly lady in her 70's had come in, made an appointment to see the next doctor when one was free and took a seat, reading the well-thumbed surgery copy of "People's Friend".

After 10 mins, a fellow patient who was waiting, got up and informed the reception there was a problem.

The receptionist went over to the lady, and noticing the ever-spreading pool of blood coming from a plastic carrier bag wrapped over her foot (which the receptionist would not have seen when the lady came in originally due to the counter height), asked what the problem was.

Elderly Lady : "Oh, I don't want to make a fuss, dear. I was in the kitchen and dropped a carving knive on to my foot, and it went through my slipper. I pulled it out, popped my foot in a plastic bag, and walked down to the surgery. Is the doctor ready now, dear ?"

The receptionist got her straight in to see the nurse who was free at the time, and yes, she'd sliced one of the main arteries and was bleeding to death. The surgery quickly stabilised the wound then called for an ambulance.

I must admit, I thought the place had seen a murder when I walked in. It was drenched.

The old lady survived and last I heard, was doing fine. She wasn't batty at all. Just stoic and stubborn and from a "different age" when one didn't make a fuss.

mudskipper
17th March 2011, 06:13
But hey, if it makes you feel better, go ahead and shout at her, because she's only being awkward for the fun of it, right ?

I don't believe I said I shout at the receptionist. I simply tell her that I'm happy to discuss what's wrong with me with a medical person. Last time she got the nurse to call me (who then made an appointment). No problem.

Board Game Geek
17th March 2011, 13:27
I don't believe I said I shout at the receptionist. I simply tell her that I'm happy to discuss what's wrong with me with a medical person. Last time she got the nurse to call me (who then made an appointment). No problem.

Sorry, I should have phrased that better to say, "If it makes people feel better". I didn't intend to single you out in particular.

However, I will stand by my comment that there really is no harm in answering the question from the receptionist, as he/or she is part of the medical team at the surgery, and will have received training on the job to decide how urgent the request is and slot you in appropriately.

Churchill
17th March 2011, 13:29
Sorry, I should have phrased that better to say, "If it makes people feel better". I didn't intend to single you out in particular.

However, I will stand by my comment that there really is no harm in answering the question from the receptionist, as he/or she is part of the medical team at the surgery, and will have received training on the job to decide how urgent the request is and slot you in appropriately.

Really? And what medical qualifications is the receptionist required to have?

MaryPoppins
17th March 2011, 13:34
Sorry, I should have phrased that better to say, "If it makes people feel better". I didn't intend to single you out in particular.

However, I will stand by my comment that there really is no harm in answering the question from the receptionist, as he/or she is part of the medical team at the surgery, and will have received training on the job to decide how urgent the request is and slot you in appropriately.

I think we can all appreciate why the question is probably being asked.

What I don't appreciate, is the tone in which I'm spoken to from the moment the phone is picked up - if it is at all. None of the things listed in your post above justify the difficulty I've encountered in several surgeries in my area.

I understand they may have had a difficult day, but that's frankly not my problem.

Spacecadet
17th March 2011, 13:36
Best place I've found for doctors is Singapore. You just turn up at the clinic and they see you there and then, although you might have to wait for a while during busy periods.
Costs about £10 + the cost of whatever drugs they prescribe, which are given to you by the receptionist on the way out.

MarillionFan
17th March 2011, 13:37
What I don't appreciate, is the tone in which I'm spoken to from the moment the phone is picked up .

Was is condescending? Was it? Was it? Little bit condenscending? Talking down to you? Making you think you're stupid? Was it? Was it? Like you're a bit thick.

cailin maith
17th March 2011, 13:41
I think we can all appreciate why the question is probably being asked.

What I don't appreciate, is the tone in which I'm spoken to from the moment the phone is picked up - if it is at all. None of the things listed in your post above justify the difficulty I've encountered in several surgeries in my area.

I understand they may have had a difficult day, but that's frankly not my problem.

WSS

I also don't appreciate they way they gossip amongst themselves about patients.

Board Game Geek
17th March 2011, 13:42
Really? And what medical qualifications is the receptionist required to have?

Team as in "part of the team", in the same way that airline stewards are part of the flight team. They may not be pilots, but they are part of the team involved in the transportation of passengers.

A receptionist will generally know enough about the condition to offer a suitable appointment, based on what the patient tells them at the time of the booking, (provided the patient isn't being awkward).

I have seen in situations where the receptionist is unsure, they ask the patient to hold, and they call the nurse or a doc, for appointment advice.

Board Game Geek
17th March 2011, 13:48
WSS

I also don't appreciate they way they gossip amongst themselves about patients.

Newsflash !

People, regardless of job, position, race, creed, whatever, gossip about people. It's not limited to a surgery. Doctors gossip in the staff room, over their tea and biscuits. I've been there fixing a PC and heard them. What I have never heard is malicious gossip. General gossip, yes. Medical gossip, yes.

cailin maith
17th March 2011, 13:53
Newsflash !

People, regardless of job, position, race, creed, whatever, gossip about people. It's not limited to a surgery. Doctors gossip in the staff room, over their tea and biscuits. I've been there fixing a PC and heard them. What I have never heard is malicious gossip. General gossip, yes. Medical gossip, yes.

Now, BGG. I do not need your newsflash to tell me that people gossip.

It is the fact that they gossip loudly in earshot of the full waiting room.

I like the fact that you have come into contact with some nice receptionists that are good at what they do. It gives me hope that one day, I may encounter such a rareity.

However, given that the majority of posters on this thread, myself included, have had bad experiences I think you are being more than a little condescending in your tone and opinion of how we approach a phone call with a surgery receptionist. I'd bet everyone of us has made the call with a polite disposition only to be confronted with an angry old battleaxe with a grudge to bear. And like MP said, frankly it's not my problem.

2BIT
17th March 2011, 14:01
Team as in "part of the team", in the same way that airline stewards are part of the flight team. They may not be pilots, but they are part of the team involved in the transportation of passengers.

A receptionist will generally know enough about the condition to offer a suitable appointment, based on what the patient tells them at the time of the booking, (provided the patient isn't being awkward).

I have seen in situations where the receptionist is unsure, they ask the patient to hold, and they call the nurse or a doc, for appointment advice.

do we really need airlines stewardesses on short flights, I know how to vacate a plane and wont eat the food (if there is any)

I agree that it is often the manner in which you are spoken to- apparently I should have been well aware of how my new surgery operates despite only having just joined- well that's the impression I got from the receptionist

'who are you Stevie Wonder? well stop *******' rolling your eyes at me then!'

the receptionists as my dentist are great

2BIT
17th March 2011, 14:03
Newsflash !

People, regardless of job, position, race, creed, whatever, gossip about people. It's not limited to a surgery. Doctors gossip in the staff room, over their tea and biscuits. I've been there fixing a PC and heard them. What I have never heard is malicious gossip. General gossip, yes. Medical gossip, yes.

yup medical gossip is totally acceptable, we all gossip about each others medical issues whatever job, position, race, creed etc etc :eyes

MarillionFan
17th March 2011, 14:04
WSS

I also don't appreciate they way they gossip amongst themselves about patients.

They probably hadn't heard of one of those being stuck up there before!:rollin:

Board Game Geek
17th March 2011, 14:29
Now, BGG. I do not need your newsflash to tell me that people gossip.

It is the fact that they gossip loudly in earshot of the full waiting room.

Can you define gossip in a bit more detail ?

Eg, if a receptionist says to the other "Did you know Missus so-and-so's son has just got a place at Oxford", and others in the waiting room hear it, then it's hardly a big deal is it ?

If it's a case of "Did you know Missus so-and-so's gone and got the clap again", that's a whole lot different, as it contravenes medical anonymity and a whole raft of other regulations. I've never heard conversations like this one, openly discussed in the waiting room. If you have, report it immediately to the Practice Manager.


I like the fact that you have come into contact with some nice receptionists that are good at what they do. It gives me hope that one day, I may encounter such a rareity..

I've met ditzy ones, dozey ones, happy ones and sad ones, clever ones and average ones. I've have yet to meet any deliberately malicious ones !



However, given that the majority of posters on this thread, myself included, have had bad experiences I think you are being more than a little condescending in your tone and opinion of how we approach a phone call with a surgery receptionist. I'd bet everyone of us has made the call with a polite disposition only to be confronted with an angry old battleaxe with a grudge to bear. And like MP said, frankly it's not my problem.

Me condescending ? Hardly. Actually, if you want a real example of that, you only need to listen to how some patients that ring up a surgery deal with the receptionists. It doesn't restore one's faith in human nature, that's for sure !

As for it "not being your problem", :eek:

cailin maith
17th March 2011, 14:46
Can you define gossip in a bit more detail ?

Eg, if a receptionist says to the other "Did you know Missus so-and-so's son has just got a place at Oxford", and others in the waiting room hear it, then it's hardly a big deal is it ?

If it's a case of "Did you know Missus so-and-so's gone and got the clap again", that's a whole lot different, as it contravenes medical anonymity and a whole raft of other regulations. I've never heard conversations like this one, openly discussed in the waiting room. If you have, report it immediately to the Practice Manager.


Very much like that. I live in a city with a massive gay community, and lots of gay patients at my surgery. Nasty was a mild discription of how they (the receptionists) were (about the patients).


If you have, report it immediately to the Practice Manager.


I did.


I've met ditzy ones, dozey ones, happy ones and sad ones, clever ones and average ones. I've have yet to meet any deliberately malicious ones !


Count yourself lucky then.


Me condescending ? Hardly.

Guess we will have to agree to differ on that.




As for it "not being your problem", :eek:

Why the :eek:? It isn't my problem.

Regardless of how bad a day I am having, or how much of an ass my last client to call was, if I treated my clients like that, I'd get the sack. Simple as.

MaryPoppins
17th March 2011, 15:41
As for it "not being your problem", :eek:

Anyone in a customer facing role, and doing it well, shouldn't pass the :shit: from one customer on to the next. Thus, it's not our problem (as polite callers) that the previous caller may have been an arseboil.

Spacecadet
17th March 2011, 15:45
Very much like that. I live in a city with a massive gay community, and lots of gay patients at my surgery. Nasty was a mild discription of how they were.


So are all gays "nasty" or just the ones at your surgery?
</sarcasm>

cailin maith
17th March 2011, 15:48
So are all gays "nasty" or just the ones at your surgery?
</sarcasm>

Oops, I meant the receptionists were nasty not the gays, they are usually grand.

Do I need to edit that post?

MaryPoppins
17th March 2011, 15:49
Oops, I meant the receptionists were nasty not the gays, they are usually grand.

Do I need to edit that post?

You homophobe.

MarillionFan
17th March 2011, 15:50
Oops, I meant the receptionists were nasty not the gays, they are usually grand.

Do I need to edit that post?

Too late to backtrack. I thought you were talking about gays as well.

cailin maith
17th March 2011, 15:51
You homophobe.

Shortarse.


Too late to backtrack. I thought you were talking about gays as well.

OMG, really, did you think that?? :o

MarillionFan
17th March 2011, 15:53
Shortarse.



OMG, really, did you think that?? :o

Honestly?

Yes, that's how I read it.

I also think you hate cripples as well from the thread I read yesterday. Good job shes doesn't hate midgets hey Mary :wink

cailin maith
17th March 2011, 15:54
Honestly?

Yes, that's how I read it.
I also think you hate cripples as well from the thread I read yesterday. Good job shes doesn't hate midgets hey Mary :wink

Bloody hell - I'm mortified now :o

MaryPoppins
17th March 2011, 16:01
Bloody hell - I'm mortified now :o

He's winding you up - he's just touchy cos his boyfriend stood him up last night.

Old Greg
17th March 2011, 16:02
He's winding you up - he's just touchy cos his rent boy stood him up last night.

FTFY - don't give him ideas above his station.

minestrone
18th March 2011, 00:53
that made me laugh! I could write a 12-volume tirade on that very subject and I rarely have to go, my mate's dad collapsed once (alcohol issues) prompting my mate to run down to the surgery (had already called ambulance) to try and get his dad some immediate attention, the battle axes on reception called the cops when my mate became exasperated with them as they refused to even contact a doctor in one of the offices, I don't think he got nicked but was too late for his dad.

I've changed surgery but the new place has a similar policy of obstinate and unhelpful receptionists.

What do you expect a GP to do for a man that has collapsed when the ambulance is on its way?

Your friend watched his dad booze himself to death for probably years and when he eventually dropped it is all the Doctor's fault? My arse.

Guilt by proxy. His death was nothing to do with the NHS but a self inflicted death where blame can be apportioned to others from simple minded people who know nothing about medicine. He boozed his way out of life and nobody stopped him. Your friend killed his dad by not stopping him drinking.

Next!

2BIT
18th March 2011, 10:26
What do you expect a GP to do for a man that has collapsed when the ambulance is on its way?

Your friend watched his dad booze himself to death for probably years and when he eventually dropped it is all the Doctor's fault? My arse.

Guilt by proxy. His death was nothing to do with the NHS but a self inflicted death where blame can be apportioned to others from simple minded people who know nothing about medicine. He boozed his way out of life and nobody stopped him. Your friend killed his dad by not stopping him drinking.

Next!

did I say it was the doctors fault?!?! next time perhaps read posts before answering we were talking about receptionists.... :winker:

mudskipper
18th March 2011, 10:30
Oops, I meant the receptionists were nasty not the gays, they are usually grand.

Do I need to edit that post?

So gays are grand, receptionists are nasty. What about gay receptionists? ;)

minestrone
18th March 2011, 10:32
did I say it was the doctors fault?!?! next time perhaps read posts before answering we were talking about receptionists.... :winker:

I was refering to the surgery as The Doctors.

Obviously your mate was being abusive so the police were called. Sounds like a nice family.

2BIT
18th March 2011, 11:18
I was refering to the surgery as The Doctors.

Obviously your mate was being abusive so the police were called. Sounds like a nice family.

I couldn't say I wasn't there, sounds like you were though :eyes

MarillionFan
18th March 2011, 11:21
I couldn't say I wasn't there, sounds like you were though :eyes

Was he Glasweigian?

cailin maith
18th March 2011, 11:41
So gays are grand, receptionists are nasty. What about gay receptionists? ;)

:spank: