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robin
22nd March 2011, 09:55
Current situation, have not been contracting too long so probably thinking about this from a moral point of view too much than I maybe should do...

I have been offered an extension of 4 months I don't really want to be here for another 4 months and would like to move on but nothing in the pipeline yet. I have a weeks notice in the contract, would it be wrong to take the renewal because I only have a weeks notice so it means I can keep myself in work/keep money coming in until I find something else?

I've had a split response so far from friends but wondered what other people in the same game feel about it?

I would always prefer to see contracts through but obviously odd occasions like this come up where I then think do I need to look after myself, if it was the other way round would they worry?

NB I work within support I don't work on projects where I would be leaving them in the lurch if I left.

NorthWestPerm2Contr
22nd March 2011, 10:00
Very simple:

You have a weeks notice so you would not be breaching contract even if you left at such short notic. However when you do switch be nice and say you will stay for 2 weeks to finish off work/assist in hand over. That way you can jump ship and show that you are not going to leave client in a pickle..... everybody wins.

TheFaQQer
22nd March 2011, 10:11
I've had a split response so far from friends but wondered what other people in the same game feel about it?

You're going to get split response here as well.

Either:

(a) look after number one. You're in business for yourself, so look after yourself. The client would do the same to you if they wanted shot - find something you want to do, then walk. Nothing is going to happen, so don't worry about it.

or

(b) you set the expectation that you would be there for four months when you signed the contract, and you should stick to that. How would you feel if the boot were on the other foot and the client terminated your contract in a couple of weeks because they found someone cheaper and showed you the door with minimum notice? You are meant to be a professional, so act like one and stay where you are until the end of the contract.

Take your choice - I've summed up whatever anyone else is going to say in this thread in one easy post for you.

GillsMan
22nd March 2011, 10:30
I would normally say that you set the expectation that you would be there for four months when you signed the contract, and you should stick to that. How would you feel if the boot were on the other foot and the client terminated your contract in a couple of weeks because they found someone cheaper and showed you the door with minimum notice? You are meant to be a professional, so act like one and stay where you are until the end of the contract.

However, as your role is not project-based, and you're working in support, you can look after number one. You're in business for yourself, so look after yourself. The client would do the same to you if they wanted shot - find something you want to do, then walk. Nothing is going to happen, so don't worry about it.

HTH.

Scrag Meister
22nd March 2011, 10:41
I have recently had a change of heart on this.

I used to think along the professional line and that I have signed for x months so stick it out.

BUT

back in November previous Clientco extended me for a further 6 months implying I was in contract for 6 months, 1 month later they terminated this as they had changed strategy, so I was out the door after another months notice period.

It swings both ways just try not to burn your bridges you never know when you will need a way back in.

SueEllen
22nd March 2011, 11:00
NB I work within support I don't work on projects where I would be leaving them in the lurch if I left.

You answered your own question.

They can get someone else in.

northernladuk
22nd March 2011, 11:32
Just to be devils advocte lets look at your position. you say you have not been contracting long so my question to you is why do you want to leave? Is the job so hard and political you are losing sleep? is it so far from home it is affecting your family life. In that case i would say yes take it and look around.

Are you just a bit bored? Job isnt as exciting as you though? Its not 700 quid a day like you tought contracting was? Do you know how hard it will be to gwt another role? These are common situations for people new to contracting looking for an easy life. If it is one of these I would say stick it through. You need to get some solid experience under your belt if you want a smooth ride nd sometimes gotta grow some very broad shoulders to be a contractor. You cannot afford to be giving notice just because you fancy it so early on in your career. Keep doing this and you will be looking at some long bench time over your career.

Hope that pus a slightly different perspective on it.

Fred Bloggs
22nd March 2011, 11:53
I suppose it depends on the market you are in. For myself, the market is dire at the moment. I would accept any extension to a current contract. In December 10, I was extended to the end of June 11. Unless things improve, I would say that there is every chance of bench time for me after that. I have been working for 38 years (the last 9 as a contractor) and never had a day out of work yet. But it could happen this year, I think.

thunderlizard
22nd March 2011, 11:55
Nothing wrong with signing and then using your week's notice, if that's what you've got. It wouldn't have been in the contract otherwise.

robin
22nd March 2011, 11:56
Northernladuk you are right and I would never leave a contract/turn down a renewal unless I had very good reason. I know if I just left contracts for silly reasons the next one might be the same and the next and so on, so yes could find myself out of work more than in.

My issue here is, long story short -

-brought in to help with a backlog
-1 other person on site with 400 users
-other person left, they asked if I wanted to stay and take job.
-agreed as contractor.
-Way too much work for 1 support person, has been mentioned but falls on deaf ears, management not on this site.
-starting to stress me out a bit hence why I don't want another 4 months of it but don't want to be out of work no money coming in either given I can carry on working here for now.

jmo21
22nd March 2011, 12:04
Northernladuk you are right and I would never leave a contract/turn down a renewal unless I had very good reason. I know if I just left contracts for silly reasons the next one might be the same and the next and so on, so yes could find myself out of work more than in.

My issue here is, long story short -

-brought in to help with a backlog
-1 other person on site with 400 users
-other person left, they asked if I wanted to stay and take job.
-agreed as contractor.
-Way too much work for 1 support person, has been mentioned but falls on deaf ears, management not on this site.
-starting to stress me out a bit hence why I don't want another 4 months of it but don't want to be out of work no money coming in either given I can carry on working here for now.

I'm not a support guy, but why let it stress you?

You ALWAYS have a get out clause..... we need more people!

Scrag Meister
22nd March 2011, 12:17
Ok, I'll make the decision for you.

1. Renew contract for 4 months to keep the money flowing.
2. Start looking for another contract
3. Leave with the required 1 weeks notice when you find one.

I think is what you were talking yourself around to anyway.

Money tick, Contractually ok tick.

robin
22nd March 2011, 12:20
Yes I think you are right I know that is probably what I will do but I suppose I just feel a bit guilty for some reason hence the post.

NorthWestPerm2Contr
22nd March 2011, 12:25
Yes I think you are right I know that is probably what I will do but I suppose I just feel a bit guilty for some reason hence the post.

Since when do contractors feel guilt?

TheFaQQer
22nd March 2011, 12:29
Yes I think you are right I know that is probably what I will do but I suppose I just feel a bit guilty for some reason hence the post.

You feel guilty because you made a commitment and expect yourself to live up to those commitments. In the same way, you probably expect a client to live up to the commitments that they make to you.

If I'm crap, then get rid of me early. But if I'm not, then I get annoyed if I'm let go early because the client can't plan properly.

I'd plan some holiday, and then suggest that because you are probably going to be having a break, negotiate to a two month contract and start looking. If nothing comes up, then you can always cancel your break and stick around longer - it does exactly what you are planning anyway, but manages expectations.

northernladuk
22nd March 2011, 13:43
My issue here is, long story short -

-brought in to help with a backlog
-1 other person on site with 400 users
-other person left, they asked if I wanted to stay and take job.
-agreed as contractor.-Way too much work for 1 support person, has been mentioned but falls on deaf ears, management not on this site.
-starting to stress me out a bit hence why I don't want another 4 months of it but don't want to be out of work no money coming in either given I can carry on working here for now.

Again with the <pedant> and it is a short explaination but taking on the permies guy role but only as a contractor? Could be IR35 flag here as well so another reason to think about leaving if you want one.

Either way, from what you have said I would go with Scrag Meisters summary. Sign, and look around and do what is right for you in this case. Sounds like it is justified.


Since when do contractors feel guilt?
Baloney. Just because we chose to find our work in this way doesn't mean we suddenly become devoid of basic human nature and a sense of professionalism. Granted it comes in different levels in each of us but a sweeping comment such as that does not cover the whole contracting community.

thunderlizard
22nd March 2011, 13:46
Since when do contractors feel guilt?

I can do guilt, for let's say another £8/hour.

lukemg
22nd March 2011, 13:58
Get yourself some time off booked, really breaks up a tough 4-monther if you have a couple of separate weeks off planned. Don't sweat the money, you will still be better off than bailing. Lets them appreciate you a bit more too !!
In the meantime, stay and start looking.

stacks
22nd March 2011, 16:18
I have always stayed the full length of the contract I signed but on my last one the programme stratergy changed overnight and I got binned with 4 days notice even though I had recently signed a 3 month extension. So now as long as it's within the letter of the contract I would have no problem walking early, they would do it to you in a heartbeat so all this "you made a commitment....bolox"

wantacontract
3rd April 2011, 19:50
Yes I think you are right I know that is probably what I will do but I suppose I just feel a bit guilty for some reason hence the post.

I know about the guilt thing mate, but after a couple more contracts, it'll disappear.

Just think in a few months, you'll be somewhere else, and once you get used to the nature of the beast, moving from one client to another, you'll start feeling less stressed about workload and their problems. Just do what you can and no more...as in don't do free overtime.

2BIT
4th April 2011, 15:10
Firstly leaving a project is harder than leaving a support role as they are often heavily reliant on schedule- that's besides the point though

if they have got a weeks notice but you are not allowed to give notice then I would negotiate that, if you already have a weeks notice your side try and negotiate that down to a days notice - that way can carry on earning and if something better comes along you can leave

so don't worry about the moral but worry about the legal/professional and negotiate favourable terms for yourself.

Stan.goodvibes
5th April 2011, 06:22
My contract just came up for renewal and I was offered another year. I wasn't fussed about doing any more time at my current client and they declined my request for a rate increase so I was going to decline the offer and have a holiday and then start looking. However I was advised by my agent to just take the extension, then look for another contract (my dream contract) at my own pace without having any pressure of needing to find another contract quickly to keep the coffers full. This advice was also deemed wise by another friend of mine who is an agent.

I spoke to my manager and said that I wasn't happy with the lack of rate increase and even though I am accepting the extension it is... just quietly... unlikely that i will be here at the end of the year. She said 'fine, that makes sense'.

Have an interview this Friday... otherwise things are fine here still with original client. If I don't get the contract after Fridays interview, then I'm not worried. I don't as a rule bail midway thru a contract, but if like me you are doing piecemeal work and leaving isn't going to send your client co to the wall then do whats best for YOU.

I've never pissed off a client by leaving early, and never been on the bench either in 20-odd years.

To paraphrase Steve Miller - "woah take the extension and run, do do do..."

SneakySimon
7th April 2011, 13:29
In an uncertain market, I would always say take the extension then quit if you find something better to move on to.

Not particulary concerned about the client as have had previous contracts end suddenly when the funding drys up or the project changes - they don't take any hesitation on booting you out!

Only tricky is the agents always want you to be available immediatly, though I have yet to see any role turnaround between offer and start in less than 3 weeks (I am banking so the background checks take some time) so always give the agent a bit of BS about holiday etc.