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d000hg
12th May 2011, 00:03
I'm no country yokel, coming from a middle class family with parents who worked in IT, but I've lived the majority of my life in laid-back Cornwall and small-town Durham so the city lights aren't my turf.

So I wondered, what's living in London like? Is it really very different or just the same thing with more places to eat and people wearing stupid cloths?

NickFitz
12th May 2011, 00:20
I don't think there is anywhere to live in The City; it's one square mile filled with office blocks full of bankers and traders, a (very) few good pubs, and the odd Starbucks isn't it?

As for The Smoke: the only way I've ever lived there is Alan Partridge style, four nights a week in a Premier Inn, so I can't really help.

I think I may be the only person who positively enjoys riding on the Northern line from Edgware to Leicester Square and back.

cojak
12th May 2011, 05:58
The are lots of places I'd live near the City. I'd love to live there.

I'd look around Clerkenwell, or there's a nice development going up at King's Cross, or the apartments a St Catherine's Docks.

shaunbhoy
12th May 2011, 06:30
.

So I wondered, what's living in London like?

It is an overpriced tuliphole full of loudmouthed, ignorant, intolerant wideboys and scruffy refugees. Avoid it like the plague.

HTH

amcdonald
12th May 2011, 06:33
I did the whole commuting thing from Dorset for years, when I got the opportunity I moved a lot closer to London, so now I have a 20 minute train journey into the city

I have the best of both worlds, easy access to London and two motorways almost on my doorstep

The other thing, anywhere decent in London costs a fortune, so unless you've got a big warchest it might make more sense to find somewhere close to London with good transport links.

MarillionFan
12th May 2011, 06:46
Lived in a caretakers flat it a corporate building on old street for 18 months. Pubs closed at 9, place was like a ghost town at the weekend.

Done the city thing now. Give me a nice piece of quiet countryside.

Bath is the nicest place I've lived, best mixture of 'city' and countryside all rolled into one.

wobbegong
12th May 2011, 06:48
It is an overpriced tuliphole full of loudmouthed, ignorant, intolerant wideboys and scruffy refugees. Avoid it like the plague.

HTH

In a nutshell!!
:yay:


I did the whole commuting thing from Dorset for years, when I got the opportunity I moved a lot closer to London, so now I have a 20 minute train journey into the city

You moved AWAY from Dorset to be CLOSER to London?
:eek:

Ah well, each to their own. I did it the other way around.

MarillionFan
12th May 2011, 06:54
It is an overpriced tuliphole full of loudmouthed, ignorant, intolerant wideboys and scruffy refugees. Avoid it like the plague.

HTH

Unlike your gaff and what you and the kids do to pass the time.

http://img.thesun.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01308/SNN1210FAM---682_1308593a.jpg:wink

d000hg
12th May 2011, 06:59
The are lots of places I'd live near the City. I'd love to live there.

I'd look around Clerkenwell, or there's a nice development going up at King's Cross, or the apartments a St Catherine's Docks.Stayed in a friend's apartment at St. Katharine's, very nice it was too - very quiet which was surprising.

When we visited London I was also taken aback how beautiful much of it was... expecting a big dirty mess but virtually everywhere we went there were lots of old buildings, areas of grass, etc. I guess London'sa bit unique in that respect - can't imagine the same in other big UK cities like Birmingham or Manchester? Glasgow perhaps, but that's hardly in the same league.

Lockhouse
12th May 2011, 07:04
I was born and brought up in North East London but now live in Winchester. I still work in The City.

Would I go back to live there? Not a chance.

OwlHoot
12th May 2011, 07:07
Lived in a caretakers flat it a corporate building on old street for 18 months. Pubs closed at 9, place was like a ghost town at the weekend.

Done the city thing now. Give me a nice piece of quiet countryside.

Bath is the nicest place I've lived, best mixture of 'city' and countryside all rolled into one.

WHS, although Bath isn't ideal for anyone with asthma or breathing problems, as the air is as damp as a well digger's arse on account of the river running through it and heated by the hot springs.

shaunbhoy
12th May 2011, 07:27
the air is as damp as a well digger's arse

:laugh :laugh :laugh


Nice one. I shall add it to my list.

Cheers OH!

Scrag Meister
12th May 2011, 07:46
I was bought up in Devon and moved up to London with a perm role in 2005, went contracting 2007.

I am fortunate enough to still have a house in Devon too, so I think I have the best of both worlds.

I really love London, but like anything its nice to get away sometimes and we go back to Devon once a month to see my kids and grand daughter.

London really is a great place, I agree with MF, that "The City" can be dead at weekends but weekday evenings are fine.

There is loads of stuff to do up in the smoke.
Theatre
Bands come to play London NOT Exeter.
Olympics
Great football teams
Get food delivered easiliy, not just Pizza

Fab public transport when the twunts aren't on strike, B0b Cr0w is the king of the twunts.
Multi ethnicity
Lot of history

Loads of other things too.

I love London and if you can it pays well, to enhance the rest of your life no end.

sasguru
12th May 2011, 07:54
I was bought up in Devon and moved up to London with a perm role in 2005, went contracting 2007.

I am fortunate enough to still have a house in Devon too, so I think I have the best of both worlds.

I really love London, but like anything its nice to get away sometimes and we go back to Devon once a month to see my kids and grand daughter.

London really is a great place, I agree with MF, that "The City" can be dead at weekends but weekday evenings are fine.

There is loads of stuff to do up in the smoke.
Theatre
Bands come to play London NOT Exeter.
Olympics
Great football teams
Get food delivered easiliy, not just Pizza

Fab public transport when the twunts aren't on strike, B0b Cr0w is the king of the twunts.
Multi ethnicity
Lot of history

Loads of other things too.

I love London and if you can it pays well, to enhance the rest of your life no end.

WHS.
Unless you are an overweight, dull, dessicated, doddery, old fart in which case London is not for you.

norrahe
12th May 2011, 08:11
I lived in the city for about 10 years and was smack bang in the east end for about 6 of it.

Since I'm still working in the city, I still have the best of both worlds but I don't miss living there anymore.

Scrag Meister
12th May 2011, 08:15
It is an overpriced tuliphole full of loudmouthed, ignorant, intolerant wideboys and scruffy refugees. Avoid it like the plague.

HTH

"About shaunbhoy
Location South Devon "

Devon is full of loud mouthed, uneducated,ignorant, inbred, small-minded, intolerant, yokels and I bet there are nearly as many immigrants there these days per head of capita.

I know, I've lived there and still do from time to time.

Shaun, when did you last work up here?

sasguru
12th May 2011, 08:17
"About shaunbhoy
Location South Devon "

It is full of ignorant, inbread, small-minded, intolerant, and I bet there are nearly as many immigrants there these days per head of capita.

I know, I've lived there and still do from time to time.

WHS. And the average IQ has been considerably lowered since SB had 5 kids. Granted they are extreme outliers though. :laugh:laugh:laugh

amcdonald
12th May 2011, 08:49
In a nutshell!!
:yay:



You moved AWAY from Dorset to be CLOSER to London?
:eek:

Ah well, each to their own. I did it the other way around.

I hated the limited work opportunities, it was always easier to commute to London and get a contract immediately rather than actually look around locally

cailin maith
12th May 2011, 08:50
Stayed in a friend's apartment at St. Katharine's, very nice it was too - very quiet which was surprising.

When we visited London I was also taken aback how beautiful much of it was... expecting a big dirty mess but virtually everywhere we went there were lots of old buildings, areas of grass, etc. I guess London'sa bit unique in that respect - can't imagine the same in other big UK cities like Birmingham or Manchester? Glasgow perhaps, but that's hardly in the same league.

Don't imagine then, go and see for yourself.

I've lived in Manchester City Centre for 8 years now and I've loved it. London is nice but it's too big for me. And I hate the tube.

I'm a bit bored of the city now and I want to live out of town and have a garden. I think I'm heading to middle age :o

MarillionFan
12th May 2011, 08:55
WHS.
Unless you are an overweight, dull, dessicated, doddery, old fart in which case London is not for you.

WHAT! WHAT! What's that you say? Speak up I can't hear you?

Can anyone get be a sandwich?

Moose423956
12th May 2011, 08:58
Unless you are an overweight, dull, dessicated, doddery, old fart in which case London is not for you.

That describes me perfectly. Which is why I hate London.

I grew up in St Austell, but moved up-country in 1985 to work, and I've lived around this area ever since. Started off in Hayes (tulip-hole), gradually moving out to Berkshire (slightly less tulip-hole), and if it wasn't for the fact that my kids still need me for childcare responsibilities I would move back to Cornwall tomorrow.

If you want my opinion, don't live in London, find somewhere that you can commute from, but which gives you easy access to the countryside.

shaunbhoy
12th May 2011, 09:07
Shaun, when did you last work up here?

Don't go near the place these days to work if it can be avoided. Congestion charges, nowhere to park, getting your car broken into, overpriced, dirty, ignorant locals, what is to like?
Plus there is always the possibility of bumping into pompous windbags like sg, who seem to think that because they own a small lean-to in some shanty town like Wandsworth, they are of some import.
Even 20 years ago when I worked there quite regularly it was seen as almost a punishment posting.
Of course Devon has problems of its own, but I'd sooner be down here breathing fresh sea air everyday than rubbing shoulders with the snotty tossers that frequent that hole.

amcdonald
12th May 2011, 09:15
Don't go near the place these days to work if it can be avoided. Congestion charges, nowhere to park, getting your car broken into, overpriced, dirty, ignorant locals, what is to like?


Filthy lucre, that's the only reason

doodab
12th May 2011, 09:37
overpriced, dirty, ignorant locals, what is to like?

if you lived here you'd find that most of them you don't have to pay.

d000hg
12th May 2011, 09:38
Let's go to a slightly different question...

Would you recommend living in London for a limited time as part of experiencing different things? With no kids and few work ties we're thinking that we actually have the opportunity to do things like that quite casually, which would be a massive upheaval to a working 2.4 kid family.

Incognito
12th May 2011, 10:00
So I wondered, what's living in London like?

I've lived in or out of London for nearly 8 years. First moved in with an ex and 3 other girls in Brockley (all dancers at London Studio) place was a shithole, but I was in my element with all those women. Poo when they all came on together.

Lived in Greenwich after that and then had a flat in Maida Vale. London is superb when you're young and on the prowl. I would never live there in a million years with my kids though.

I hate the tube, I hate driving in London, I hate the crowds, I hate the pretentiousness, I hate the 'multicultural' assimilation of large swathes of London.

There are far superior capital cities than London.

doodab
12th May 2011, 10:03
Would you recommend living in London for a limited time as part of experiencing different things? With no kids and few work ties we're thinking that we actually have the opportunity to do things like that quite casually, which would be a massive upheaval to a working 2.4 kid family.

If you have a bit of money and can afford to live centrally in a good area, yes absolutely. It's a fantastic city if you have the money to enjoy what is on offer, and being central means you get easy access to that without the cost and hassle of a taxi ride home.

Living like a pauper somewhere shitty like New Cross is a different matter. You will get ground down into misery like the rest of the happy faces you see on the tube.

sasguru
12th May 2011, 10:07
I've lived in or out of London for nearly 8 years. First moved in with an ex and 3 other girls in Brockley (all dancers at London Studio) place was a tuliphole, but I was in my element with all those women. Poo when they all came on together.

Lived in Greenwich after that and then had a flat in Maida Vale. London is superb when you're young and on the prowl. I would never live there in a million years with my kids though.

I hate the tube, I hate driving in London, I hate the crowds, I hate the pretentiousness, I hate the 'multicultural' assimilation of large swathes of London.

There are far superior capital cities than London.

Lucky that you feel that way, since you wouldn't be able to afford London.
As others have noted, if you have the money London is brilliant since it has the best of everything: restaurants, parks, cultural life, village-like enclaves where everybody knows everyone else.
But the basic requirement is that you earn enough to have a large house in a leafy area and that is beyond most.

Incognito
12th May 2011, 10:12
Lucky that you feel that way, since you wouldn't be able to afford London.
As others have noted, if you have the money London is brilliant since it has the best of everything: restaurants, parks, cultural life, village-like enclaves where everybody knows everyone else.
But the basic requirement is that you earn enough to have a large house in a leafy area and that is beyond most.

Whatever sunshine. I chose to move out of London, I could quite easily afford to move back in. Quality of life is important to me though and you don't get that in some squashed two up two down with a postage stamp of a back garden and no parking in front of your house.

You keep kidding yourself that you're happy, you're the only one banging on every week about how great your house and life is, sounds like you're trying to convince yourself.

Even though it is none of your business, I do still own property in London. I'd never live there though and will flog it after the Olympics.

sasguru
12th May 2011, 10:16
Quality of life is important to me though and you get that in some 4 bed with a large garden and your own private parking.

.

FTFY.

EternalOptimist
12th May 2011, 10:22
Don't imagine then, go and see for yourself.

I've lived in Manchester City Centre for 8 years now and I've loved it. London is nice but it's too big for me. And I hate the tube.

I'm a bit bored of the city now and I want to live out of town and have a garden. I think I'm heading to middle age :o

awww, you just reminded me of my most favourite contractor memory. When I look back for highlights, or memorable stuff that made it all worthwhile, I remember this -

I was working in Dartford, staying in a travellodge about 3 miles out of town, and there was absolutely nothing to do. it was block of cheese, pickles and ten cans in the room every night.

Then I realised there was a railway crossing near the back of the hotel, with a little village on the other side. There was a pub with a lovely beer garden, it has a big trellis fence covered in climbing roses, the scents were fantastic.
I spent three months in that quiet beer garden, doing my sudukio, watching the lazy bees, and getting quietly pissed in the sunshine. fantastic.

It was London, but definately not the city


:rolleyes:

d000hg
12th May 2011, 10:26
Not sure why a large house is important. A nice house in a nice area is the important thing. Without kids you really don't need 4 bedrooms. A nice 2-bed apartment with a decent living area could be just fine.

Incognito
12th May 2011, 10:29
FTFY.

Sure you did. Looks like on street parking and postage stamp gardens to me.

Bellevue Road, Wandsworth - Google Maps (http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=Bellevue+Road,+Wandsworth&aq=0&sll=51.447134,-0.167327&sspn=0.018749,0.045791&gl=uk&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Bellevue+Rd,+Wandsworth,+Greater+London,+Uni ted+Kingdom&ll=51.444094,-0.165766&spn=0.002344,0.005724&t=h&z=18&layer=c&cbll=51.443837,-0.165519&panoid=Z55O-pcVxZRFbIKzRta4Qg&cbp=12,311.11,,0,0)

Of course when you're used to being able to actually swing a cat in your front room (not literally) I suppose anything else does actually look cramped. Can you hear the neighbours through the walls in that terraced house of yours? How quaint.

sasguru
12th May 2011, 10:31
Not sure why a large house is important. A nice house in a nice area is the important thing. Without kids you really don't need 4 bedrooms. A nice 2-bed apartment with a decent living area could be just fine.

True, but I think a large leafy garden is essential when you live in any large town.
When I read a book under the apple tree in my garden, I could be anywhere. And if I get bored there's excitement a short tube ride away.
Flat living in London without an outside space is not very nice, I imagine.

d000hg
12th May 2011, 10:35
I'm not sold on gardens in a row behind the houses... those long narrow ones you see most commonly even on £1m houses. Seems you don't really get the privacy and you can't get a 'proper' garden without living in the country... I'm spoilt by having lived in the country so town gardens always disappoint me and I'd happily go without.

sasguru
12th May 2011, 10:36
Sure you did. Looks like on street parking and postage stamp gardens to me.

Bellevue Road, Wandsworth - Google Maps (http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=Bellevue+Road,+Wandsworth&aq=0&sll=51.447134,-0.167327&sspn=0.018749,0.045791&gl=uk&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Bellevue+Rd,+Wandsworth,+Greater+London,+Uni ted+Kingdom&ll=51.444094,-0.165766&spn=0.002344,0.005724&t=h&z=18&layer=c&cbll=51.443837,-0.165519&panoid=Z55O-pcVxZRFbIKzRta4Qg&cbp=12,311.11,,0,0)

Of course when you're used to being able to actually swing a cat in your front room (not literally) I suppose anything else does actually look cramped. Can you hear the neighbours through the walls in that terraced house of yours? How quaint.

I live off one of the roads in Nightingale. The locals call BelleVue the area as well as being the name of a road. Edwardian villa with own parking and large garden.

HTH

Thanks for looking it up though, for someone who professes not to care you do go through an awful lot of work.

swamp
12th May 2011, 10:37
There are quite a lot of people who can't or won't get on with London. They don't have to come here, and they don't need to grumble about it either.

Otherwise London can be great, especially if you pick your area well. There are some really nice houses and there is lots of work here. Remember that many people have specialised careers, and London is the only place they can work in the UK or even the world.

Incognito
12th May 2011, 10:39
Thanks for looking it up though, for someone who professes not to care you do go through an awful lot of work.

I can't take the credit for that, it was another poster somewhere else in this thread. I couldn't care less. Can you hear the neighbours TV at night through your terraced house walls? How quaint.

russell
12th May 2011, 10:42
Pay well over the odds for a cramped flat? Get stuck in never ended traffic jams? Get crushed on the underground? Pay double for everything the rest of the country pay? Get knifed/shot/mugged every few days?

No thanks

Saying that I wouldn't live in the country either, did anyone see Stewart Lee last night, his bit about the country was excellent?

sasguru
12th May 2011, 10:42
can you hear the neighbours TV at night through your terraced house walls? How quaint.

Its very quiet where I live, I don't know if that's because its not terraced.
It probably is quiet because the people who live there are well behaved, prosperous and hard working rather than being lower class oiks.

HTH

DimPrawn
12th May 2011, 10:43
I live off one of the roads in Nightingale. The locals call BelleVue the area as well as being the name of a road. Edwardian villa with own parking and large garden.

HTH

Thanks for looking it up though, for someone who professes not to care you do go through an awful lot of work.

Sounds lovely. Please tell us more about this delightful place.

doodab
12th May 2011, 10:44
Not sure why a large house is important. A nice house in a nice area is the important thing. Without kids you really don't need 4 bedrooms. A nice 2-bed apartment with a decent living area could be just fine.

You don't need a big house, if you don't need space having a flat somewhere right in zone 1 is much more fun and although the rent/cost is on a par with a house further out it's probably cheaper when you factor in what you'll save on late night taxis. You don't need a garden cos there are plenty of parks (I used to be a 2 minute walk from regents park) but a little bit of outdoor space e.g. a roof terrace so you can have a BBQ / sit outside in the summer is nice. Location is the most important thing, and that depends what sort of stuff you are into e.g. east of liverpool st is quite trendy these days (but fills up with city & essex types), the city is a bit dead, clerkenwell / farringdon has quite a lot going on but less in the way of greenery, mayfair / kensington / chelsea are terribly posh, soho / covent garden ideal if you like going out round there e.g. theatre and stuff as well as bars, shops etc, marylebone is posh but quieter and has a nice local feel to it even if you do have the oxford st & bond st shops 10 minutes walk away, the south bank is a bit less salubrious and actually there are a few bits I'd avoid personally. But in general, if you are in zone one you won't be far from any of it.

sasguru
12th May 2011, 10:45
Get knifed/shot/mugged every few days?

No thanks

That would only happen to you since you scream "Victim" from every pore.
:laugh :laugh:laugh

sasguru
12th May 2011, 10:46
Sounds lovely. Please tell us more about this delightful place.

No you couldn't afford it and it would only make you jealous.

doodab
12th May 2011, 10:47
Pay well over the odds for a cramped flat? Get stuck in never ended traffic jams? Get crushed on the underground? Pay double for everything the rest of the country pay? Get knifed/shot/mugged every few days?

That's the thing though, if you live in a nice part of central London you don't have to deal with any of that. Except the paying :laugh

MrMark
12th May 2011, 10:48
One thing you soon learn living in london, is that you can live as cheaply as anywhere else if you're careful and not too fussy. I've found several places to get a haircut for less than a tenner, but it's easy to pay double or more if you insist on choosing places in zone 1 to patronise. Often you can avoid using the tube by using other modes of transport - I agree it's a pain if a Tube journey is necessary.

Great things about London: good transport links, great parks, museums, dining options etc.

Bad things about London: the noise and traffic, pubs (some decent ones about, but most other UK cities have a far better selection), Oxford street.

Would I move away? For the right job/contract yes. But I can't say that anything here is dire enough to chase me away.

doodab
12th May 2011, 10:52
Its very quiet where I live, I don't know if that's because its not terraced.
It probably is quiet because the people who live there are well behaved, prosperous and hard working rather than being lower class oiks.

HTH

The older terraced houses usually have brick dividing walls so tend to fare fairly well acoustically anyway.

DimPrawn
12th May 2011, 10:55
No you couldn't afford it and it would only make you jealous.

:tantrum:

russell
12th May 2011, 10:56
That would only happen to you since you scream "Victim" from every pore.
:laugh :laugh:laugh

I suppose a well dressed, obviously rich man would be the target of muggers, thanks. I'm sure you would be mistaken for a drunken penniless tramp so its safe for you.

doodab
12th May 2011, 10:57
One thing you soon learn living in london, is that you can live as cheaply as anywhere else if you're careful and not too fussy. I've found several places to get a haircut for less than a tenner, but it's easy to pay double or more if you insist on choosing places in zone 1 to patronise. Often you can avoid using the tube by using other modes of transport - I agree it's a pain if a Tube journey is necessary.

Great things about London: good transport links, great parks, museums, dining options etc.

Bad things about London: the noise and traffic, pubs (some decent ones about, but most other UK cities have a far better selection), Oxford street.

Would I move away? For the right job/contract yes. But I can't say that anything here is dire enough to chase me away.

Zone 1 = Mr Toppers £6 haircuts. Bargain. Most places further out will have their share of £20 barbers, esp in the "gentrified" bits.

Oxford St is great if you live close by because you can approach the shops from the back and get everywhere you need to without having to walk down oxford st itself, and having the likes of selfriges, john lewis etc on your doorstep is pretty handy. Even so it's best to do ones Christmas shopping in the sales the year before, or online.

sasguru
12th May 2011, 10:58
The older terraced houses usually have brick dividing walls so tend to fare fairly well acoustically anyway.

Not sure about that. Used to have a terrace about 10 years ago and you could hear the next door baby crying quite clearly.
The thing is in the better parts of London, most people add sound proofing when renovating.
The facades of houses in posh parts of London tell you nothing about their interiors, most are like Tardis's with extensions to the back, loft conversions and stripped-out modernistic interiors.

sasguru
12th May 2011, 11:00
Zone 1 = Mr Toppers £6 haircuts. Bargain. Most places further out will have their share of £20 barbers, esp in the "gentrified" bits.

Oxford St is great if you live close by because you can approach the shops from the back and get everywhere you need to without having to walk down oxford st itself, and having the likes of selfriges, john lewis etc on your doorstep is pretty handy. Even so it's best to do ones Christmas shopping in the sales the year before, or online.

If you have the money Marylebone is indeed a very nice, characterful and quiet place to live, with some cracking hostelries if you know where to look.

russell
12th May 2011, 11:05
Zone 1 = Mr Toppers £6 haircuts. Bargain. Most places further out will have their share of £20 barbers, esp in the "gentrified" bits.

Oxford St is great if you live close by because you can approach the shops from the back and get everywhere you need to without having to walk down oxford st itself, and having the likes of selfriges, john lewis etc on your doorstep is pretty handy. Even so it's best to do ones Christmas shopping in the sales the year before, or online.

So stay in overpriced London and then eek out an existence counting the pennies because the landlord is bending you over.

d000hg
12th May 2011, 11:16
All these complaints about the tube, I think it's one of the best things about London from a few visits. It's amazing you can just flit around such a huge city so quickly.

Is it expensive if you live there? We found for tourism a day-pass was cheaper than Oyster since we were making several journeys each day rather than just commuting to work, can you not get a year pass or something dramatically cheaper? What's the best £/day you can get for Zone 1 or maybe 1/2 only?

doodab
12th May 2011, 11:26
All these complaints about the tube, I think it's one of the best things about London from a few visits. It's amazing you can just flit around such a huge city so quickly.

Is it expensive if you live there? We found for tourism a day-pass was cheaper than Oyster since we were making several journeys each day rather than just commuting to work, can you not get a year pass or something dramatically cheaper? What's the best £/day you can get for Zone 1 or maybe 1/2 only?

I used to pay about £80-90 a month for my tube pass which IIRC was for zone 1 & 2, I expect it's gone up now. A zone 1-3 pass for where I am now costs £123.70 a month or about £1300 for the year.

The cost depends on where you shop, how often you go out and so on. If you get all your food from Selfridges and spend £50 a day on lunch in a nice restaurant you will get through quite a lot of money.

doodab
12th May 2011, 11:31
So stay in overpriced London and then eek out an existence counting the pennies because the landlord is bending you over.

One thing I have learned from watching rich people, don't waste money, spend it on the things that are important. If you are walking to the barbers for a short back and sides and you have a choice of several it's common sense to go to the place that does it for £6 rather than vidal ******* sassoon isn't it? Especially if the walk will take you via your favourite Japanese restaurant. My quality of life will not be improved by a £20 haircut, but an extra £14 of sushi and beer makes a big difference.

cailin maith
12th May 2011, 11:37
One thing I have learned from watching rich people, don't waste money, spend it on the things that are important. If you are walking to the barbers for a short back and sides and you have a choice of several it's common sense to go to the place that does it for £6 rather than vidal ******* sassoon isn't it? Especially if the walk will take you via your favourite Japanese restaurant. My quality of life will not be improved by a £20 haircut, but an extra £14 of sushi and beer makes a big difference.

<drool> Sushi....

MarillionFan
12th May 2011, 12:11
No point spending lots of money on expensive stuff.

I get most of my clothes from charity shops and if you wait until after lunch near the local Maccy Ds someone always leaves a drink and a half eaten burger.

That's why I'm rich.

Cliphead
12th May 2011, 12:13
I'll stick to my old barn and four acres of grounds including the orchard and the wee stream that runs through part of it. If I want to be in London the airport's 10 minutes away.

Pondlife
12th May 2011, 12:14
No point spending lots of money on expensive stuff.

I get most of my clothes from charity shops and if you wait until after lunch near the local Maccy Ds someone always leaves a drink and a half eaten burger.

That's why I'm rich.

You are of course correct. Such a lifestyle would require little in terms of cash. Add to this the money to be saved on personal hygeine products and you start to see some real indirect savings.

Not having friends means never having to buy a round.


And women... they're an expensive luxury that many around here could probably live without.

MarillionFan
12th May 2011, 12:16
I'll stick to my old barn and four acres of grounds including the orchard, the empty drive , burglers and the wee stream that runs through part of it. If I want to be in London the airport's 10 minutes away.

ftfy

doodab
12th May 2011, 12:20
There are loads of wee streams in London. Disgusting habit pissing in the street like that.

DimPrawn
12th May 2011, 12:24
10 minutes walk from where sasguru waxes lyrical

Boy, 15, dies after south London stabbing | UK news | guardian.co.uk (http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/may/12/boy-dies-south-london-stabbing)

Scrag Meister
12th May 2011, 12:24
There are loads of wee streams in London. Disgusting habit pissing in the street like that.

Yes, mostly eminating from shop doorways?

doodab
12th May 2011, 12:31
10 minutes walk from where sasguru waxes lyrical

Boy, 15, dies after south London stabbing | UK news | guardian.co.uk (http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/may/12/boy-dies-south-london-stabbing)

That's more like 45 minutes from Nightingale Lane though.

DimPrawn
12th May 2011, 12:35
That's more like 45 minutes from Nightingale Lane though.

Not if you are running from Camberwell with a dozen youths armed with knives behind you it's not.

:laugh

Sysman
12th May 2011, 12:35
Not sure about that. Used to have a terrace about 10 years ago and you could hear the next door baby crying quite clearly.
The thing is in the better parts of London, most people add sound proofing when renovating.
The facades of houses in posh parts of London tell you nothing about their interiors, most are like Tardis's with extensions to the back, loft conversions and stripped-out modernistic interiors.

The problem I have with a lot of London houses is that narrow frontages combined with extensions out the back make them pretty dark inside.

sasguru
12th May 2011, 12:37
That's more like 45 minutes from Nightingale Lane though.

Exactly. Might as well be a another country.
:laugh:laugh:laugh

Meanwhile on Dim's council estate:

http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north-east-news/evening-chronicle-news/2008/10/25/three-stabbed-on-north-east-streets-72703-22116002/

I suppose it was a friendly stabbing though as they're all so friendly up there in their NorthEastern paradise.

DimPrawn
12th May 2011, 12:39
How much is a house in Wandsworth with a 2 acre garden, detached triple garage, parking for at least 10 cars on the front drive, gated entrance, 5000 sq feet of accommodation and at least 7 bedrooms, with indoor heated swimming pool and fully equipped gymnasium?

Don't really want to move to a smaller place.

Sysman
12th May 2011, 12:40
My quality of life will not be improved by a £20 haircut, but an extra £14 of sushi and beer makes a big difference.

Says the man who is supposed to be cutting costs (http://forums.contractoruk.com/general/65306-bankruptcy.html).

DimPrawn
12th May 2011, 12:41
Exactly. Might as well be a another country.
:laugh:laugh:laugh

Meanwhile on Dim's council estate:

ChronicleLive - News - Chronicle News - Three stabbed on North East streets (http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north-east-news/evening-chronicle-news/2008/10/25/three-stabbed-on-north-east-streets-72703-22116002/)

I suppose it was a friendly stabbing though as they're all so friendly up there in their NorthEastern paradise.

That was four years ago. I've since recovered thanks.

sasguru
12th May 2011, 12:42
The problem I have with a lot of London houses is that narrow frontages combined with extensions out the back make them pretty dark inside.

We've done one but skylights and complete glass frontage down one side makes it very bright and light, more than it used to be.

doodab
12th May 2011, 12:51
Says the man who is supposed to be cutting costs (http://forums.contractoruk.com/general/65306-bankruptcy.html).

It was a while ago, in fact during that period of my life I was feeding the warchest at a formidable rate.

shaunbhoy
12th May 2011, 14:54
I get most of my clothes from charity shops

Indeed. And you really cut a dash in them too, if you don't mind me saying. :wink

http://photos2.fotosearch.com/bthumb/UNY/UNY930/u16798644.jpg



sasguru on the other hand.................well.....little wonder he doesn't fear getting mugged!!
:laugh

http://photos3.fotosearch.com/bthumb/DSN/DSN023/1821215.jpg

Is that a Hyabusa Trolley?

:laugh

norrahe
12th May 2011, 15:33
There are loads of wee streams in London. Disgusting habit pissing in the street like that.

In the city you get lots of street pizza as well as the wee stains, especially at the latter end of the week and not just in street corners :sick

d000hg
12th May 2011, 16:42
I'll stick to my old barn and four acres of grounds including the orchard and the wee stream that runs through part of it. If I want to be in London the airport's 10 minutes away.And salad carpet outside the kebab shop?

Cliphead
12th May 2011, 17:39
And salad carpet outside the kebab shop?

What kebab shop?

Scrag Meister
12th May 2011, 17:47
What kebab shop?

Any kebab shop, not even a London specific thing.

Follow the trail of lettuce, tomato, cabbage and chili.

Cliphead
12th May 2011, 17:48
Any kebab shop, not even a London specific thing.

Follow the trail of lettuce, tomato, cabbage and chili.

Would be a lot of salad to leave a five mile trail to my place :laugh

d000hg
12th May 2011, 18:01
Oops, quoted wrong post. I'm going to leave it though, it's nicely surreal to read when you quote one post and reply to another. I'm sure a game could be made of it.