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View Full Version : Lizzie visits Ireland!!



shaunbhoy
17th May 2011, 07:32
BBC News - Queen in Ireland: Chequered history behind visit (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13405416)

Some factoids!

amcdonald
17th May 2011, 08:23
You'd think in the interests of security they send a queen not The Queen :igmc:

russell
17th May 2011, 08:44
Already a few diffused bombs.

SimonMac
17th May 2011, 08:46
Already a few diffused bombs.

The taigs are welcoming her with fireworks, how nice!

alreadypacked
17th May 2011, 08:54
Will the EU agree with Ireland spend their money on the visit?

8,000 gardaí gear up for (http://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/ireland/8000-gardai-gear-up-for-30m-queens-visit-504925.html)

SimonMac
17th May 2011, 09:00
Will the EU agree with Ireland spend their money on the visit?

8,000 gardaí gear up for (http://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/ireland/8000-gardai-gear-up-for-30m-queens-visit-504925.html)

quid pro quo just as I doubt the majority of the UK tax payers were happy to pay for the policing of the Pope's visit

Mich the Tester
17th May 2011, 09:22
Already a few diffused bombs.

Crazy. Bombs are completely indiscriminate. Any bomb attack on a royal visit is likely to cause injury or death to innocent bystanders. I expect that the majority of Irish people will be very angry about bomb attacks or attempts, and rightly so.

cailin maith
17th May 2011, 09:25
Crazy. Bombs are completely indiscriminate. Any bomb attack on a royal visit is likely to cause injury or death to innocent bystanders. I expect that the majority of Irish people will be very angry about bomb attacks or attempts, and rightly so.

Indeed.

I'm actually really worried about it. I think it's Thursday that she visits my home town, quite a few of my family are in the army some of my friends have husbands in either the Gardai or the army and I worry for all their safety, not just the Queens.

Mich the Tester
17th May 2011, 09:32
Indeed.

I'm actually really worried about it. I think it's Thursday that she visits my home town, quite a few of my family are in the army some of my friends have husbands in either the Gardai or the army and I worry for all their safety, not just the Queens.

Well I think that if something does happen it would only strengthen the will of the majority to sort things out peacefully. Just think of this; the Irish security people found a bomb on a bus. A bus! Who uses the bus and what in heaven's name is that going to achieve? Kill a couple of OAP's? Kids on their way to school? Young mothers out doing the shopping? I think the reaction in Ireland would be absolute fury and the 'real IRA' would lose even more of the tiny amount of support they have. As for the police and the army; they're brave people and they have to be to do that job in Ireland; I'm sure they'll gain the respect of a lot of people for what they're doing.

Incognito
17th May 2011, 11:29
BBC News - Queen in Ireland: Chequered history behind visit (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13405416)

Some factoids!

Rather than peddling this great myth of Britain shafting Ireland over the centuries what you have is the following:


The Irish protesters who gathered on the streets of Dublin at the weekend branded Britain "the neighbour from hell" as they demonstrated against the Queen's forthcoming visit to the Republic of Ireland.

Hardline dissident republicans held placards, waved flags and voiced their hostility towards the British crown. They vowed to make sure that the Queen's first trip to Dublin would be her last.

The demonstration on Sunday afternoon in the city centre was heavily publicised in advance. It was billed as a chance for Dubliners to let the world see the depth of Irish opposition to the high-profile British visitor.

How many people turned up? About 50.

BBC News - Queen in Ireland: Royal visit fails to ignite passions (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13410653)

I have been to Ireland countless times, twice whilst serving to Cork and Dublin. The Irish are lovely people who almost to a man couldn't give a shit about what is happening up North anymore. They want peace, they want an end to the hostility. You get more problems about perceived Irishness in Glasgow, Belfast and Boston than you ever do in Dublin.

I have served with Irishmen who were as proud to wear the uniform as I was. 7000 Irish servicemen and women died in conflict during WW2, this is more than any of the political troubles post 1916. You pay them a great disservice spouting this nationalist crap. Most Irishmen I have spoken to and drunk with want absolutely nothing to do with the scumbags in the North. Right now it is Britain's issue, they do not want it to become Ireland's issue.

There is a reason why Sinn Fein are a Northern Irish party with little presence in the South.

norrahe
17th May 2011, 13:13
The Irish are lovely people who almost to a man couldn't give a tulip about what is happening up North anymore. They want peace, they want an end to the hostility. You get more problems about perceived Irishness in Glasgow, Belfast and Boston than you ever do in Dublin.

They want absolutely nothing to do with the scumbags in the North. Right now it is Britain's issue, they do not want it to become Ireland's issue.

There is a reason why Sinn Fein are a Northern Irish party with little presence in the South.

Hear Hear!

russell
17th May 2011, 13:17
Rather than peddling this great myth of Britain shafting Ireland over the centuries what you have is the following:



BBC News - Queen in Ireland: Royal visit fails to ignite passions (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13410653)

I have been to Ireland countless times, twice whilst serving to Cork and Dublin. The Irish are lovely people who almost to a man couldn't give a tulip about what is happening up North anymore. They want peace, they want an end to the hostility. You get more problems about perceived Irishness in Glasgow, Belfast and Boston than you ever do in Dublin.

I have served with Irishmen who were as proud to wear the uniform as I was. 7000 Irish servicemen and women died in conflict during WW2, this is more than any of the political troubles post 1916. You pay them a great disservice spouting this nationalist crap. Most Irishmen I have spoken to and drunk with want absolutely nothing to do with the scumbags in the North. Right now it is Britain's issue, they do not want it to become Ireland's issue.

There is a reason why Sinn Fein are a Northern Irish party with little presence in the South.

Gricerboys fantasy posts were more believable than this, come back gricer all is forgiven.

alreadypacked
17th May 2011, 13:35
Rather than peddling this great myth of Britain shafting Ireland over the centuries what you have is the following:



BBC News - Queen in Ireland: Royal visit fails to ignite passions (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13410653)

I have been to Ireland countless times, twice whilst serving to Cork and Dublin. The Irish are lovely people who almost to a man couldn't give a tulip about what is happening up North anymore. They want peace, they want an end to the hostility. You get more problems about perceived Irishness in Glasgow, Belfast and Boston than you ever do in Dublin.

I have served with Irishmen who were as proud to wear the uniform as I was. 7000 Irish servicemen and women died in conflict during WW2, this is more than any of the political troubles post 1916. You pay them a great disservice spouting this nationalist crap. Most Irishmen I have spoken to and drunk with want absolutely nothing to do with the scumbags in the North. Right now it is Britain's issue, they do not want it to become Ireland's issue.

There is a reason why Sinn Fein are a Northern Irish party with little presence in the South.

They are and gaining.

Sinn Féin President Gerry Adams was elected in Louth on the first count. Sinn Féin will be well into double figures.

Irish general election, 2011 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_general_election,_2011)

The finance problems in Ireland has meant anyone who can get out, is going. Those left behind are blaming main stream politicians for the mess and looking for more extreme solutions.

Incognito
17th May 2011, 13:47
They are and gaining.

Sinn Féin President Gerry Adams was elected in Louth on the first count. Sinn Féin will be well into double figures.

Irish general election, 2011 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_general_election,_2011)

The finance problems in Ireland has meant anyone who can get out, is going. Those left behind are blaming main stream politicians for the mess and looking for more extreme solutions.

SF are the fourth party in Irish politics. That puts them on a par with UKIP/Greens/Respect/BNP here in the UK, take your pick.

alreadypacked
17th May 2011, 14:20
SF are the fourth party in Irish politics. That puts them on a par with UKIP/Greens/Respect/BNP here in the UK, take your pick.

But if they continue to increase their share at the current rate, it may not be long before they are power sharing in a future government.

With the current government shooting itself in the foot at every opportunity it may not be long before the get another chance to increase their share.


Ireland just floated another proposal that is sure to be another big hit with the general population:
Ireland Proposes To Tax Pensions | zero hedge (http://www.zerohedge.com/article/ireland-proposes-tax-pensions)



Irish Bombshell: Government Raids PRIVATE Pensions To Pay For Spending:

[url=http://maxkeiser.com/2011/05/10/ireland-are-you-starting-to-get-the-picture-yet/[/url]

Churchill
17th May 2011, 14:50
Sinn Fein had better watch there arses, trying to distance themselves from the Real IRA and the old guard hasn't done them any favours.

Word on the street here is that they've been told to tone down their condemnation of the recent attacks or else.

Gerry Adams and Martin McGuinness are shitting bricks. They have upset some very unpleasant characters indeed.

Incognito
17th May 2011, 14:50
But if they continue to increase their share at the current rate, it may not be long before they are power sharing in a future government.


The only reason SF increased their vote is the collapse of Fianna Fáil after the implosion of the Irish economy. Fianna Fáil had been the largest party in Irish politics since 1927. They lost almost 3/4's of their seats at the last election. Even with that complete collapse they still have more seats than SF. That tells you everything you need to know.

Zippy
17th May 2011, 15:00
The vast majority of us are reasonable people who just want to get along together. I hope the visit goes well. It is a bit of a shame Mrs Windsor can't meet a few of the locals, though.

(Obviously the 'reasonable people' bit doesn't apply to us loonies on CUK) :tongue

Mich the Tester
17th May 2011, 15:03
The vast majority of us are reasonable people who just want to get along together. I hope the visit goes well. It is a bit of a shame Mrs Windsor can't meet a few of the locals, though.

(Obviously the 'reasonable people' bit doesn't apply to us loonies on CUK) :tongue

Actually the Irish are almost the only 'reasonable people' on CUK.

Which reminds me; I haven't seen CM's paddle in a while.

Churchill
17th May 2011, 15:06
Actually the Irish are almost the only 'reasonable people' on CUK.

Which reminds me; I haven't seen CM's paddle in a while.

She's busy watching the Queen on TV.

Mich the Tester
17th May 2011, 15:06
Mash spot on as usual. (http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/celebrity/philip-to-say-'mick'-no-more-than-eight-times-201105173824/)

cailin maith
17th May 2011, 15:08
Actually the Irish are almost the only 'reasonable people' on CUK.

Which reminds me; I haven't seen CM's paddle in a while.

You haven't been naughty enough to make me need to use it on you. I kinda miss the old days when I just paddled everyone for the fun of it.

For old times though.... :spank::spank::spank:

cailin maith
17th May 2011, 15:08
She's busy watching the Queen on TV.

:o Can't get enough of it.

Mich the Tester
17th May 2011, 15:08
You haven't been naughty enough to make me need to use it on you. I kinda miss the old days when I just paddled everyone for the fun of it.

For old times though.... :spank::spank::spank:

:moon::moon::moon:

Mich the Tester
17th May 2011, 15:11
Beeb;"Meanwhile, the Duke of Edinburgh is talking to the harpist, interrupting her playing."

Wonder what he's saying?

"there's one of those on my wife's flag but I've never seen her fondling it"

Zippy
17th May 2011, 15:14
Actually the Irish are almost the only 'reasonable people' on CUK.

Which reminds me; I haven't seen CM's paddle in a while.

Blatant fishing for a spanking - shame on you Mich.

Mich the Tester
17th May 2011, 15:16
Blatant fishing for a spanking - shame on you Mich.

It worked though! :tongue

russell
17th May 2011, 15:17
Is that right, its the first ever visit to Ireland by a Monarch?

Shirley not?

cailin maith
17th May 2011, 15:19
Is that right, its the first ever visit to Ireland by a Monarch?

Shirley not?

:spel first ever visit to the Irish Republic by a Monarch.

Churchill
17th May 2011, 15:20
Is that right, its the first ever visit to Ireland by a Monarch?

Shirley not?

You don't know much about History, do you?

Mich the Tester
17th May 2011, 15:21
Is that right, its the first ever visit to Ireland by a Monarch?

Shirley not?


:spel first ever visit to the Irish Republic by a Monarch.

So who was Queen Shirley?

Old Greg
17th May 2011, 15:33
:spel first ever visit to the Irish Republic by a Monarch.

:spel first ever visit to the Republic of Ireland by a Monarch. The Irish Republic ceased to exist in 1922.

cailin maith
17th May 2011, 15:34
:spel first ever visit to the Republic of Ireland by a Monarch. The Irish Republic ceased to exist in 1922.

Meh, same same :wink

shaunbhoy
20th May 2011, 11:33
Later this afternoon, the Queen will visit Cork's English Market, which was given its name in the 1840s by the Protestant upper classes who frequented it to distinguish from another market which was used more by the city's Irish Catholic inhabitants.




So she has gone all the way over to Ireland for the first time and is heading off to see an "English Market".
What an imagination her itinerary planners have.

:laugh

Incognito
20th May 2011, 11:45
So she has gone all the way over to Ireland for the first time and is heading off to see an "English Market".
What an imagination her itinerary planners have.

:laugh

It's almost like you're trying to make a point about something? Why not come out and say it?

amcdonald
20th May 2011, 11:48
So she has gone all the way over to Ireland for the first time and is heading off to see an "English Market".
What an imagination her itinerary planners have.

:laugh

More telling is that the Irish have sought to inflict Westlife on her

shaunbhoy
20th May 2011, 11:49
It's almost like you're trying to make a point about something? Why not come out and say it?

The point I was making was, surely if she wants to see an "English Market", she could go and see one in England? You know, the country she lives in?
Bit like going to Andalucia and insisting upon eating a "Full English Breakfast" at the "Dog and Duck" instead of sampling what the locals might have to offer!
But no doubt your touchy-sensors are bristling with some alternative motive for me. :tongue

shaunbhoy
20th May 2011, 11:51
More telling is that the Irish have sought to inflict Westlife on her

Why not, they inflicted them on us!!! And Graham fooking Norton!!!

:tantrum:

norrahe
20th May 2011, 12:14
Why not, they inflicted them on us!!! And Graham fooking Norton!!!

:tantrum:

Too right, revenge is ours!! mwah ahahahahahahahaha :laugh

RichardCranium
20th May 2011, 13:54
I kinda miss the old days when I just paddled everyone for the fun of it.

For old times though.... :spank::spank::spank:You've reminded me:

How to explain the residents of the British Isles to others

First there are the Welsh, who pray upon their knees ... and upon their neighbours.
Then there are the Scots, who keep The Good Book ... and anything else they can lay their hands on.
Next there are the Irish, who fight for want they want ... they just don't know what they want.
Finally there are the English, who are a nation of self-made men ... which relieves the Almighty of a terrible burden.

:p


As for the Queen's visit, both her family and Philip's have seen much premature, violent death over the centuries and yet they are doing something many British politicians have never had the balls to do. And anything which can patch over the differences must be a good thing, especially given we are just territories in a greater Europe.

Old Greg
20th May 2011, 20:15
As for the Queen's visit, both her family and Philip's have seen much premature, violent death over the centuries and yet they are doing something many British politicians have never had the balls to do. And anything which can patch over the differences must be a good thing, especially given we are just territories in a greater Europe.

I resent that she extended her sympathy to all the victims of the troubled history between the two countries without making an explicit exception for Norris McWhirter's brother.

RichardCranium
20th May 2011, 20:55
I resent that she extended her sympathy to all the victims of the troubled history between the two countries without making an explicit exception for Norris McWhirter's brother.That was a pathetic murder, and probably the point in my teenage years when I realised what values the IRA stood for: nothing. It's just a handful of loonies that should be in some place like Broadmoor who were recruited by cowards to commit hellish crimes against innocents to support the cowards' desire to maintain an anarchistic environment where their crimes (robbing banks, blackmail, local extortion, etc.) could be hidden under the guise of politics.

Prince Philip deserves an extra medal for saying nothing about his uncle, Louis Mountbatten.