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View Full Version : Max Mosley: Nazi allegations were extremely damaging to me



russell
24th November 2011, 16:34
"Ex-Formula One boss tells media ethics inquiry he was "outraged" about News of the World story wrongly alleging he took part in a Nazi-themed orgy."

Yeah it was a satanic orgy, get it right FFS!

Jeebo72
24th November 2011, 16:36
"Ex-Formula One boss tells media ethics inquiry he was "outraged" about News of the World story wrongly alleging he took part in a Nazi-themed orgy."

Yeah it was a satanic orgy, get it right FFS!

It was an orgy. Cool.

TheFaQQer
24th November 2011, 16:50
"Ex-Formula One boss tells media ethics inquiry he was "outraged" about News of the World story wrongly alleging he took part in a Nazi-themed orgy."

Yeah it was a satanic orgy, get it right FFS!

The key point, which you seem to have missed, is that stating that it was a "Nazi-themed orgy", this brings back memories of Oswald Mosley, which Max has taken some steps to distance himself from.

Satanic wouldn't have been newsworthy (even if true), whereas by implying that he was no different from his father, it was.

What he gets up to in his own time, providing it's all consensual and legal (which this was) is his own business and not in the public interest.

bless 'em all
24th November 2011, 16:51
:spank::spank::spank:

He loved it.

:spank::spank::spank:

Old Greg
24th November 2011, 18:01
The key point, which you seem to have missed, is that stating that it was a "Nazi-themed orgy", this brings back memories of Oswald Mosley, which Max has taken some steps to distance himself from.

Satanic wouldn't have been newsworthy (even if true), whereas by implying that he was no different from his father, it was.

What he gets up to in his own time, providing it's all consensual and legal (which this was) is his own business and not in the public interest.

The politics isn't just his dad's. He has form (as a young man admittedly). So if it was Nazi themed, I think it would have been in the public interest, but if not, then not.



Politics

From their teens to early twenties, Mosley and his brother were involved with their father's post-war party, the Union Movement (UM), which advocated a united Europe as its core issue. Trevor Grundy, a central figure in the UM's Youth Movement, writes of the 16-year-old Mosley painting the flash and circle symbol on walls in London on the night of the Soviet Union's invasion of Hungary (4 November 1956).[23] The flash and circle was used by both the UM and the pre-war BUF. He also says Mosley organised a couple of large parties as a way "to get in with lively, ordinary, normal young people, girls as well as boys, and attract them to the Movement by showing that we were like them and didn't go on about Hitler and Mussolini, Franco and British Fascism all the time."[24] Mosley met his future wife Jean at such a party. Mosley and Alexander were photographed posing as Teddy Boys in Notting Hill during the 1958 race riots between Afro-Caribbeans and local white gangs of Teddy Boys. The following year, they canvassed for their father when he ran as a Union Movement candidate for the nearby Kensington North seat in the 1959 General Election. Sir Oswald used racist rhetoric during the campaign, which was run largely on anti-immigration issues.[25][26]
Mosley was later an election agent for the Union Movement, supporting Walter Hesketh as parliamentary candidate for Moss Side in 1962.[27] The motor racing journalist Alan Henry describes him as one of his father's "right-hand men" at the time of a violent incident in 1962, in which Sir Oswald was knocked down by a mob in London and saved from serious injury by his son's intervention.[28][29] As a result of his involvement in this fracas, Mosley was arrested and charged with threatening behaviour. He was later cleared at Old Street Magistrates' Court on the grounds that he was trying to protect his father.[14] In 1964, Mosley himself was a prospective UM candidate.[30]
In the early 1980s, Mosley attempted a political career, working for the UK Conservative Party and hoping to become a parliamentary candidate. Bernie Ecclestone's biographer, Terry Lovell, writes that he gave up this aspiration after being unimpressed by "the calibre of senior party officials".[31] He also felt his name would be a handicap and has since said "If I had a completely open choice in my life, I would have chosen party politics, but because of my name, that's impossible."[30] By the late 1990s he had become a supporter of the UK Labour Party.[32]

Max Mosley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_mosley#Politics)

centurian
24th November 2011, 18:58
Isn't he suing Google to get them to remove all references of the event from search results.

Even if what the NoW did was factually incorrect - the damage is done. Sue the paper for cash, but you can't erase the event from history - although he seems to be giving it a crack.