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Ignis Fatuus
8th February 2012, 08:12
Next time I happen to have a contract in NL, I might go to evening class and learn Dutch. It would be interesting anyway, but could it lead to being able to apply for "Dutch-speaking" contracts? Or do they really mean "Dutch person wanted"?

wobbegong
8th February 2012, 08:37
I doubt an evening class will give you enough to talk 'techie' in a role. From experience, albeit many years ago, the Dutch evening course consisted of conjugating some basic verbs, a bit of day to day pleasantries/greetings and how to ask for stuff in shops and restaurants.

norrahe
8th February 2012, 08:41
Next time I happen to have a contract in NL, I might go to evening class and learn Dutch. It would be interesting anyway, but could it lead to being able to apply for "Dutch-speaking" contracts? Or do they really mean "Dutch person wanted"?

Read it how you like, but a lot of companies have switched from their business language from English to Dutch.
The country is a tad more internal looking atm, and over the course of the last few years I have seen less English speaking roles advertised.
Given the current lack of skilled workers, it will swing around again and there will be more of a demand for English speaking workers.
I'm in the same boat as you, have started Dutch lessons so it will make me more marketable, but be warned, it aint an easy language to learn :laugh

Good luck!

I would recommend the Michel Thomas Method to get you started, but also taking up lessons is a good idea

Paddy
8th February 2012, 09:27
Next time I happen to have a contract in NL, I might go to evening class and learn Dutch. It would be interesting anyway, but could it lead to being able to apply for "Dutch-speaking" contracts? Or do they really mean "Dutch person wanted"?

Yes, they want a Dutch person.

Ignis Fatuus
8th February 2012, 09:45
I doubt an evening class will give you enough to talk 'techie' in a role. From experience, albeit many years ago, the Dutch evening course consisted of conjugating some basic verbs, a bit of day to day pleasantries/greetings and how to ask for stuff in shops and restaurants.Well, it has worked for me in German: didn't do any at school, then went to evening classes at Goethe Institut in London, then went on to pick it up more in real life. German-speaking roles are common for me now.

It may not be worth it for NL, since you are effectively only looking at 1 country and even there it would only make a difference for roles that are Dutch-speaking but are not disguised Dutch-person roles. Still, my experience in Germany and Switzerland suggests that even if the role is supposed to be English-speaking, you're more likely to get it if you speak the language.

petergriffin
8th February 2012, 10:08
I's a waste of time. If you're not Dutch or Flemish you will never be given top roles reserved for Dutch, whatever your fluency of the language. Learn or improve your German instead.

Sysman
8th February 2012, 10:08
Still, my experience in Germany and Switzerland suggests that even if the role is supposed to be English-speaking, you're more likely to get it if you speak the language.

This is true. Just being able to read documentation in German is an advantage.

One other thing a Swiss friend mentioned - he used to be happy speaking to me in English when we were out and about, but ever since he got surrounded by Bobs in the office he's been forced to speak English all the time at work, so now prefers to speak his own language during his leisure time.

petergriffin
8th February 2012, 10:13
. Still, my experience in Germany and Switzerland suggests that even if the role is supposed to be English-speaking, you're more likely to get it if you speak the language.
Holland is nothing like the Germanic world. In the latter you're appreciated if you speak their language, in Holland if you speak Dutch they'll reply in English.

norrahe
8th February 2012, 10:17
Holland is nothing like the Germanic world. In the latter you're appreciated if you speak their language, in Holland if you speak Dutch they'll reply in English.

True, it depends on where you are though.

In Amsterdam they'll always reply in English and persist, anywhere else I find if you persist in dutch they will speak Dutch back.

I've found that the Dutch do appreciate it if you have taken the effort to learn the lingo.

SimonMac
8th February 2012, 10:18
How hard can it be


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhtq1ObGHy8

BlasterBates
8th February 2012, 10:43
Next time I happen to have a contract in NL, I might go to evening class and learn Dutch. It would be interesting anyway, but could it lead to being able to apply for "Dutch-speaking" contracts? Or do they really mean "Dutch person wanted"?

No they mean someone who can speak Dutch. If you get fluent it would be no problem.

Ignis Fatuus
8th February 2012, 10:44
Holland is nothing like the Germanic world. In the latter you're appreciated if you speak their language, in Holland if you speak Dutch they'll reply in English.Yes, but if you read Dutch then you won't get the effect where nobody wants to send you an email conversation because then they'd have to translate all the previous emails for you.

norrahe
8th February 2012, 12:04
Yes, but if you read Dutch then you won't get the effect where nobody wants to send you an email conversation because then they'd have to translate all the previous emails for you.

Hasn't stopped my colleagues from sending me stuff, but thankfully I've had a lot of exposure so I get the general context without having to resort to google gobbledygook ( the Dutch to English is hilarious).

BlasterBates
8th February 2012, 12:17
If you speak the language fluently you'll be treated like a local so definitely worth learning. Once the fluency is there people don't see the "foreigner" anymore. You don't necessarily have to write it, thouigh once you can speak it you should be able write pretty well as well. If you already speak German it's pretty easy to get fluent.

petergriffin
8th February 2012, 16:40
If you speak the language fluently you'll be treated like a local so definitely worth learning. Once the fluency is there people don't see the "foreigner" anymore. You don't necessarily have to write it, thouigh once you can speak it you should be able write pretty well as well. If you already speak German it's pretty easy to get fluent.
I'm glad it worked for you but my experiences have not been very good. In my last contract I got in serious trouble with my colleagues who stopped speaking Dutch when I was around because I understood them (well , sort of..). The only good thing is that I'm able to read and almost wholly understand a Dutch contract, but this hasn't really helped me much. But I improved my German while in Holland as the Germans were very keen on speaking with me in their language.