PDA

View Full Version : TV licence cheats make up a TENTH of all magistrate court cases



TimberWolf
20th March 2012, 18:37
And are treated more harshly than shoplifters, thugs and vandals, allegedly.

TV licence cheats make up a TENTH of all magistrate court cases | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2117389/TV-licence-cheats-make-TENTH-magistrate-court-cases.html#ixzz1pgRLvchi)

BigTime
20th March 2012, 18:41
And are treated more harshly than shoplifters, thugs and vandals, allegedly.

TV licence cheats make up a TENTH of all magistrate court cases | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2117389/TV-licence-cheats-make-TENTH-magistrate-court-cases.html#ixzz1pgRLvchi)

I got caught once and the inspector was a right tosser wanting to come in and check what I was watching (which I declined as it was obvious I had the telly on). Fortunately the gf I just moved in with had a direct debit setup from where she was living before - result:smokin:

TimberWolf
20th March 2012, 18:44
Judging by the Daily Mail reader comments and their ratings, the BBC don't have a lot of sympathisers.

AtW
20th March 2012, 18:45
It's not a license, it's a tax.

And on these grounds I am out.

TimberWolf
20th March 2012, 18:46
It's not a license, it's a tax.

And on these grounds I am out.

Is that your last word on the issue?

escapeUK
20th March 2012, 18:46
I got caught once and the inspector was a right tosser wanting to come in and check what I was watching (which I declined as it was obvious I had the telly on). Fortunately the gf I just moved in with had a direct debit setup from where she was living before - result:smokin:

Maybe you was watching a dvd you dont need a license to do that..... :spank:

TimberWolf
20th March 2012, 18:48
The BBC licence enforcement officer's job market must be booming.

BigTime
20th March 2012, 18:49
Maybe you was watching a dvd you dont need a license to do that..... :spank:

I was too honest I guess and I did have that patio door open with the live football on so it was pretty obvious. Michael Moore did a TV Nation thing on people going to prison for watching telly (can't seem to find it on youtube).

vetran
20th March 2012, 19:19
Its a licence to own receiving equipment. Giving an unfair advantage to a government propaganda arm.

They can do you even if you have only sky and no aerial.

Freeview was a perfect opportunity to fix that, they could have scrambled the channels and charged for descramble. Plenty of time to sort it, just needed to specify CAM modules in all freeview boxes. Missed boat but they could still offer it belatedly.

This summer we could have gone subscription only and see how well their unique left wing programming survived. Would at least prove how popular BBC in minority language of some 13 hairy extremists choice was.

STOP wasting my money pursuing a private corporations debts.If they are that bad at selling a service they have to intimidate then they deserve to go bust.

I would seriously consider paying for a service if I didn't have to put up with bargain hunt!

Note I have always paid it because it was a legal requirement doesn't mean it was fair.

xoggoth
20th March 2012, 19:26
if I didn't have to put up with bargain hunt!

Man after my own heart there! Why do wimmin watch these things?

NickFitz
20th March 2012, 19:35
This summer we could have gone subscription only and see how well their unique left wing programming survived. Would at least prove how popular BBC in minority language of some 13 hairy extremists choice was.


The most-watched channel on the Sky platform is BBC 1. Not only does Sky get to broadcast it without paying the BBC (because of the licence fee), but the BBC is actually required to pay Sky £10 million a year for the privilege of giving Sky their most-popular content. Without the licence fee, Sky would be putting their prices up.

TimberWolf
20th March 2012, 19:36
The BBC rake in £3.5 billion from licence fees alone each year. That's a lota lolly. Little wonder they could afford to pay Jonathan Woss upteen millions.

BBC - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC#Finance)

Sysman
20th March 2012, 19:38
Note I have always paid it because it was a legal requirement doesn't mean it was fair.

Many years ago they defrauded me.

My telly packed up shortly after I'd bought my first house and the interest rates had walloped up, so I couldn't afford a replacement telly.

They completely ignored my letters to them saying I no longer had a telly.

When I got a new job and a pay increase, I rented a telly and got a licence. The bastards backdated until when my previous licence had expired.

I call that fraud.

eek
20th March 2012, 19:40
The most-watched channel on the Sky platform is BBC 1. Not only does Sky get to broadcast it without paying the BBC (because of the licence fee), but the BBC is actually required to pay Sky £10 million a year for the privilege of giving Sky their most-popular content. Without the licence fee, Sky would be putting their prices up.

Technically I think the £10m is not for Sky to broadcast the content but to put it at the top of the tv guide. Its years since I cared about this though so things may have changed. Also the regional variations are a pain which results in spending a fortune broadcasting multiple variations of the same programs.

ITV wasn't on Sky for years as the regional costs were prohibitive as ITV and BBC geographic regions are different and they couldn't piggy back off the BBC which they wanted to do.

escapeUK
20th March 2012, 19:43
Just unplug it from aerial. You'll feel a lot better without the lefty programming content on bbc and all the adverts on the other channels.

Zippy
20th March 2012, 19:54
You only need to have a tv licence if you are watching or recording live broadcasts. You are allowed to watch stuff from BBC online or listen to radio stations or watch DVDs sans licence. Having a telly is not an admission of guilt.
Just tell the shiny suited :winker: on your doorstep to f*** off as you don't have to answer any questions or let them in.

Might be best to turn the telly down before you answer the door though :)

TimberWolf
20th March 2012, 19:58
You only need to have a tv licence if you are watching or recording live broadcasts. You are allowed to watch stuff from BBC online or listen to radio stations or watch DVDs sans licence. Having a telly is not an admission of guilt.
Just tell the shiny suited :winker: on your doorstep to f*** off as you don't have to answer any questions or let them in.

Might be best to turn the telly down before you answer the door though :)

Do you need a radio licence for a radio?

Zippy
20th March 2012, 20:01
Do you need a radio licence for a radio?

Don't think so

MayContainNuts
20th March 2012, 20:05
Do you need one if you watch delayed TV or just films??!!!!!

BigTime
20th March 2012, 20:11
Do you need one if you watch delayed TV or just films??!!!!!

No. That's why they now run those ads targeting students watching live streams.

The radio licence appears to have disappeared in '69 Cost - The history of the UK radio licence (http://www.radiolicence.org.uk/costlicence.html)

VectraMan
20th March 2012, 20:38
Technically I think the £10m is not for Sky to broadcast the content but to put it at the top of the tv guide. Its years since I cared about this though so things may have changed. Also the regional variations are a pain which results in spending a fortune broadcasting multiple variations of the same programs.

Yep. Sky doesn't broadcast the BBC at all; the BBC has made its own arrangements to broadcast over satellite (that's also true for lots of the other channels on Sky). They pay for the place on the EPG. Sky are forced by Ofcom to carry the BBC and provide a mechanism for doing the regional programmes, and equally, the BBC have an obligation to try to reach everybody, and there are about 7 million Sky (and I think about 3 million cable) subscribers.

Lockhouse
21st March 2012, 08:13
Now my 85 year old father in law lives with us I no longer have to buy one as we get a freebee. There have to be some advantages.

Zoiderman
21st March 2012, 08:48
It may sound suprising, but according to a 2007 report by Harry Snook, a barrister for the Centre for Policy Studies, there are 266 powers allowing officials to enter your home, and not all require a warrant. Those who can break in include firefighters, in an emergency, and police arresting a suspect. The Environment Agency can gain access without a warrant where there is danger of pollution or damage to public health.

Electricity and gas companies can come in to inspect equipment or change a meter but have to give at least two days' notice (though they can enter in an emergency).

Landlords are allowed to enter their property and seize goods in lieu of unpaid rent, and local authorities can enter your home for a number of reasons, including to turn off a continuous burglar alarm or pest extermination.

Police need warrants to enter if they suspect you have been making biological weapons, fertilising human eggs or running a tattoo parlour at home. Bailiffs are not allowed to break in; however, once they have gained "peaceful entry" (this can be through an open window), they are allowed to come back at any time and force entry.

Then there are the more unusual Acts. Under the Bees Act, officers can enter to search for foreign bees. Under the Hypnotism Act, the police can enter a property where they suspect offences related to stage hypnotism are taking place. Stage hypnotism, strangely, is not an offence in itself.

link (http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2008/feb/26/law)

GillsMan
21st March 2012, 09:39
Landlords are allowed to enter their property and seize goods in lieu of unpaid rent,

link (http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2008/feb/26/law)

That landlords one is wrong. Or at least its superseded by other requirements/interpretations in the Housing Act, such as the right of the tenant to quiet enjoyment, which pretty much prevents us from entering their home while they have exclusive occupation. It might be true for landlords of lodgers, but certainly not landlords of tenants in the normal sense.

We are allowed in during an emergency but, unless invited to enter by the tenant, that is it.

Zoiderman
21st March 2012, 09:53
That landlords one is wrong. Or at least its superseded by other requirements/interpretations in the Housing Act, such as the right of the tenant to quiet enjoyment, which pretty much prevents us from entering their home while they have exclusive occupation. It might be true for landlords of lodgers, but certainly not landlords of tenants in the normal sense.

We are allowed in during an emergency but, unless invited to enter by the tenant, that is it.


I have access at anytime if I believe something is wrong with the house, damage, etc. I checked this. We can also have reasonable access to perform condition checks, subject to, last time I looked, 24 hours notice. If I believe something is broken, which could damage the property, I can gain entry too.


I did just that when one was on holiday and there was a leak in the bath waste pipe.


Effectively, you can cobble a way to get in at any stage, just as the Police don't really need a warrant if they want to come into the house.

hyperD
21st March 2012, 10:17
I stopped paying my telly tax a few years ago. You only need one if you are watching or recording live broadcast. You do not need one for your computer (unless you have a TV tuner in it and are watching live broadcast, or you watch live broadcast using iPlayer, although they can't detect that) or for your TV. Playing games using your TV as a monitor does not require a licence.

The company responsible for collecting the licence is TV Licensing, a subsidiary of Capita Business Services.

Every time you buy a TV or Recorder, you give your address to the retailer who sends it, by law, to Capita who lookup the address with the database (LAZZY) of licensed premises - if you are not one of them, the automated faux threatening letters start. I say "faux" because they are written in very clever way by looking quite threaty legally, but in actual fact, full of hot air and nonsense.

Bin them.

The best way to stop the Capita salesmen from even walking on your drive is to put an "implied right of access denied" notice outside your door. If they walk up your drive they can be threatened with civil trespass, repeatedly harassment. Letters can be stopped for two years it seems by informing Capita of a threat of harassment.

You are not legally obliged to open the door to the Capita salesman.

You do not have to talk to them. In actual fact, don't. Ever.

They have no right of entry, like any private company and person, unless accompanied by a search warrant (not the police one) but they must have accumulated evidence and sent it to the judge, which is normally you signing one of their forms, hence don't speak to them and certainly NEVER sign anything even through the post.

TV detectors don't exists, none have been used in court. Snooping salesmen and a database are all there is.

The implied right of access denied notice is your most powerful weapon.

Loads of stuff on the net. Look it up if you're interested. The TV licence is an anachronism. It will go eventually as it is a 20th century construct that does not fit in a digital age.

Plus the BBC is full of obnoxious progressive liberals with their Marxists ideals so would be nice for them to crawl back under their stones from whence they came.

You don't have to pay £146/year - spend it on you and the kids instead until the licence is finally removed.

Paddy
21st March 2012, 10:45
In the last ten years I have had three forced entries into my property whist I have been away working.

Gas Co, forced entry changed locks to read the meter, they had the wrong post code. I have no gas and no meter but they still keep making a mistake and send me bills. They got my name from the Landregistry. The gas people stole the washing machine and 12 bottles of wine. The police said can you prove they stole the washing machine. Umm, it was there on Monday, it is not there on Friday, the efing gas people broke in...

The City Council broke in to get access to the back garden (they could have used the rear gate). The neighbour had reported a dangerous overhanging branch. It was not considered dangerous and they gave a six page report on three of my trees, none of which need to be cut back.

During 9/11 I was working in Moscow, I got a call from home in the UK saying that the police want to search my home because the neighbour had reported people talking foreign languages and taking suitcases out in the middle of the night. The police ended up not searching but after they had a quick look around to verify there was nothing suspicious, they went away with no apology.

Zoiderman
21st March 2012, 10:58
The best way to stop the Capita salesmen from even walking on your drive is to put an "implied right of access denied" notice outside your door. If they walk up your drive they can be threatened with civil trespass, repeatedly harassment. Letters can be stopped for two years it seems by informing Capita of a threat of harassment.



I was also going to quote this, and it is a really useful tool. You can actualy write to anyone and remove their implied access. It is based on postmen being allowed on your property to deliver mail, and means there's an implied right of access. Easily removed from anyone you may wish you.

Good post. I think it can still be overridden by some of the others, e.g. EA, Gas supplier etc. BUt good to get rid of undesirables.

I know of a debt collector/debtor finder, was always thwarted by these letters, as if he did knock, he was breaking the law, and thus anything he delivered would be voided.

As said, plenty of info on the web

Zoiderman
21st March 2012, 11:01
implied right of access (http://www.bbctvlicence.com/Withholding%20implied%20right%20of%20access.htm)

Pete Marsh
21st March 2012, 11:19
Bailiffs are not allowed to break in; however, once they have gained "peaceful entry" (this can be through an open window), they are allowed to come back at any time and force entry.


I thought that was vampires?

Zoiderman
21st March 2012, 11:24
I thought that was vampires?

Nah, they really don't give a tulip and are bound only by their own moral code...

Or was that bankers?

NotAllThere
21st March 2012, 11:41
The Swiss have a license system as well, and it's almost impossible to avoid. The license covers cable, satellite and terrestrial broadcast, radio receivers - including the one in the car - and live-streaming of broadcasts.

Then, they send a letter to all ltdcos, demanding a license as well. Told them to get stuffed on that one.

Swiss TV licensing is a favourite whinge from US expats. That and the fact that church and state aren't seperate.

Sysman
21st March 2012, 11:52
During 9/11 I was working in Moscow, I got a call from home in the UK saying that the police want to search my home because the neighbour had reported people talking foreign languages and taking suitcases out in the middle of the night. The police ended up not searching but after they had a quick look around to verify there was nothing suspicious, they went away with no apology.

Ye gods. Just as well I wasn't living there in 2001. My house was full of foreigners then.

norrahe
21st March 2012, 11:55
The company responsible for collecting the licence is TV Licensing, a subsidiary of Capita Business Services.

Every time you buy a TV or Recorder, you give your address to the retailer who sends it, by law, to Capita who lookup the address with the database (LAZZY) of licensed premises - if you are not one of them, the automated faux threatening letters start. I say "faux" because they are written in very clever way by looking quite threaty legally, but in actual fact, full of hot air and nonsense.

Bin them.



They don't seem to check the address at all but the name of the person who bought the device and if it doesn't match the one that is one the premises then they constantly send you letters maintaining you don't have a tv licence at the property.

I got these when Mr N bought summat for the tv, the licence is in my name but we got constant stream of letters, saying they had checked the address and it appeared we had no licence.

B*ll*cks!

Sysman
21st March 2012, 12:09
The Swiss have a license system as well, and it's almost impossible to avoid. The license covers cable, satellite and terrestrial broadcast, radio receivers - including the one in the car - and live-streaming of broadcasts.

They'll try to get you for a mobile phone which has radio functionality too. I considered dropping telly but it seemed that the only way to escape that bit of the fee was to have my cable sealed off (which would cost) and I was using that for t'internet. I ended up going digital to get more channels and value for my licence fee.


Then, they send a letter to all ltdcos, demanding a license as well. Told them to get stuffed on that one.

What was that about? Sometime last year I read that their next target was to charge businesses for employees having access to TV or radio from their work computers. Good luck with that one, the relevant sites will get blocked.

Another gotcha: Anyone staying in a hotel for longer than 3 months is liable for a licence fee as well, despite the fact that the hotel is already paying.


Swiss TV licensing is a favourite whinge from US expats. That and the fact that church and state aren't seperate.

I must have been lucky. I've managed to avoid the church and state whinge ;)

Sysman
21st March 2012, 12:12
They don't seem to check the address at all but the name of the person who bought the device and if it doesn't match the one that is one the premises then they constantly send you letters maintaining you don't have a tv licence at the property.

I got these when Mr N bought summat for the tv, the licence is in my name but we got constant stream of letters, saying they had checked the address and it appeared we had no licence.

B*ll*cks!

I got around that one by putting my parents' address down when buying a TV and video recorder.

Well, there was another reason to do that - rumours were flying in my area that someone was selling lists of newly bought equipment so that thieves could steal to order.

vetran
21st March 2012, 12:24
rumours were flying in my area that someone was selling lists of newly bought equipment so that thieves could steal to order.

the ingenuity of it. Some of these thieves could be millionaires if they went straight.

Zoiderman
21st March 2012, 12:26
the ingenuity of it. Some of these thieves could be millionaires if they went straight.

I have often said there isn't much distinction in the minds of succesful criminals and succesful businessmen. Some of their ideas are really quite clever.

Still, wouldn't hesitate to pop a couple of cartridges in the face of any burglar that came into my home.

hyperD
21st March 2012, 12:30
They don't seem to check the address at all but the name of the person who bought the device and if it doesn't match the one that is one the premises then they constantly send you letters maintaining you don't have a tv licence at the property.

I got these when Mr N bought summat for the tv, the licence is in my name but we got constant stream of letters, saying they had checked the address and it appeared we had no licence.

B*ll*cks!

Yes, you are indeed correct, they cross-check names with the addresses as well.

Which is why you should not fill in their "I do not need a licence, please come and search my knicker drawers for hidden TVs" form that Capita will send to you.

The smallprint at the bottom states they will start sending letters all over again after 2 years... the bastards are like cockroaches.

I'll have to take the Capita model and start harassing my clients that way...

Sysman
21st March 2012, 13:19
I have often said there isn't much distinction in the minds of succesful criminals and succesful businessmen. Some of their ideas are really quite clever.

I think this was in Oh Lucky Man:


It's a thin line between the House of Lords and Pentonville jail

Peoplesoft bloke
21st March 2012, 15:38
Yes, you are indeed correct, they cross-check names with the addresses as well.



No - she was saying they are too useless to cross-check. This is my experience too, as a person who co-habits with someone with a totally different name.

I wonder if famous beardy **** Noel Edmonds ever coughed up for a TV licenc in the end?

hyperD
21st March 2012, 15:52
No - she was saying they are too useless to cross-check. This is my experience too, as a person who co-habits with someone with a totally different name.

I wonder if famous beardy **** Noel Edmonds ever coughed up for a TV licenc in the end?

Sorry, I understood correctly, just poorly written.

There was something in the Mail/Sun last year about TVL not pursuing or said he paid? Can't be arsed to google....right, going home - cycling in the sun!