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DaveTheRave
27th April 2012, 16:23
First off im 21 years old with no work experience for IT in a working environment, i do however have a couple of basic certifications (MCDST & A+) which really is not enough to get you into anything apart from maybe an apprenticeship. Also I got these nearly 2 years ago now so I really need to take the next step in my career.

I am considering having the next few months of intensive training which will consist of courses, reading through books, getting as many certifications (maybe even volutary work) etc untill I have all the knowledge to get on the ladder! I may even get a loan if i dont have the funds available as i am aware some are quite expensive.

So basically i am asking the question of where do i start? What path should i take? What are the main shortages of out there at the moment? Or certs that an employer is going to see and say wow. I understand, experience is key. And employers may overlook all these shiny certs right? I am really clueless in most aspects to the IT industry at the moment to be honest but i just want to have the best possible start.

Im thinking of aiming towards maybe as a software engineer?

Any help would be much appreciated!

Dave

Ps im writing this on an iphone so rushed all the grammar etc

Kanye
28th April 2012, 11:52
On the sysadmin side, look into devops and associated tools such as chef & puppet.

Get an account on Amazon and have a play with EC2, configuring some instances.

Devops & cloud management will be a huge growth area.

General Java/.NET CRUD development will probably continue to come under pressure for outsourcing, offshoring, SAAS etc and get more and more competitive so I'd steer clear of that.

Dig into JavaScript and HMTL5 and take a look at client side Backbone.js for a niche within development which I think will do well.

SimonMac
28th April 2012, 16:08
Are you based in Bournemouth? I think there was a recent Job Advertised which would be perfect for you

MarillionFan
30th April 2012, 18:49
You talk about experience - correct you need it. You also need the right attitude. Depending on what you're expecting there are plenty of small companies willing to take people on and show them the ropes. They won't pay much, but the opportunities are there.

If for example you were to outline in more detail what you were looking for then you never know maybe someone on here would have an opportunity.

gaz7
3rd June 2012, 16:27
I was in a similar situation as yours when i started out. I had a degree in computer Science but no experience and no employer would look at anyone without decent experience. I was looking for a software Engineer roles and in the end decided to do 8 months unpaid work just to get the commercial experience i needed on my CV. I would say in my experience don't spend loads of money on courses to get certificates. I got a couple of VB.net book spent about 2 months reading through them for 5 hours every day, and not moving on until i understood everything. I then fired off about 100 Cv's to local companies basically saying i will work for free if they use VB.Net.

Most of my friends thought i was mad to work for nothing however i got some work stayed for about 8 months, got the vital experience and reference i needed, then got a paid job as a software engineer off the back off that experience. It wasn't an easy time doing unpaid work a lot comes down to your attitude and how much do you really want it.

Don't give up though - oh and i am now on about 3 times as much money now as those mates who thought it was crazy...good luck

petergriffin
4th June 2012, 01:09
I'm 21 years old with no work experience for IT
Perfect for management or, failing that, recruitment.

bobspud
6th June 2012, 12:10
Hi,
what others have said get into a small- medium company and show willing to move into a very junior IT position, and then pick up on the tools and start teaching yourself.

CodeCobbler
6th June 2012, 13:17
Why would anyone *want* a "career" in IT? BTW you will never get a GF either...just sayin, its like insect repellent. :winker:

<Mod note: Not appropriate for professional forums>

bobspud
6th June 2012, 14:14
Why would anyone *want* a "career" in IT? BTW you will never get a GF either...just sayin, its like insect repellent. :winker:

Funny that. I have had quite a rock and roll lifestyle in IT, and as many guys my age will tell you GF's are not that great as they tend to grow into wives that have kids and all spend tonnes of cash...

oscarose
6th June 2012, 15:03
Not so nowadays old chap as many workings is now outsourced overseas and a bob invasion is underway. I’d look into ‘future-proof’ careers, e.g. aircon units, water purifiers, green energy and counselling.

HTH

:o

petergriffin
6th June 2012, 20:44
Hi,
what others have said get into a small- medium company and show willing to move into a very junior IT position, and then pick up on the tools and start teaching yourself.
Thing is, this was ok 10 years ago, Nowadays there's no such a thing as a small IT company. It's all about the cloud and if you don't work for and with the usual suspects who do some sort of cloud computing, there's no business. Unless you have 15-20 years work experience and tons of contacts but I assume this is not the case of the OP.

bobspud
7th June 2012, 09:27
Thing is, this was ok 10 years ago, Nowadays there's no such a thing as a small IT company. It's all about the cloud and if you don't work for and with the usual suspects who do some sort of cloud computing, there's no business. Unless you have 15-20 years work experience and tons of contacts but I assume this is not the case of the OP.

Thats a ten year landscape for the OP though. Even when I started in IT I started small and grew in to a big systems guy over 20 years. Now I am at the front of Cloud and can see it for what its always been... no one can expect to do a degree then get a job straight into a data centre with 1000's of square footage of compute space. Since 1990ish I have seen converged mainframe systems on OfficePower, divergence to the PC and servers, the explosion of the Interweb a massive adoption of huge data centres, thousands of ferral disparate IT systems and now the move back towards a mainframe architecture (aka cloud)...

For most of it I saw the same technologies at the root of it....

Go to a reprographics house or a print shop or a small business... They don't have the want for fecking about in the clown'd they want a few PC's linked to a file and print and some web pipes... I am already encountering companies that have been burned by Azure or EC2 and want to go back to a cleaner home owned architecture...

The way in is finding a company like them and adopting the IT piece as you go. Then you have experience running a small office network. and you can grow even if its only a few levels up... But thats where you learn, because no one else can do it for you.