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suityou01
5th May 2012, 17:23
A friend of mine has been restoring one of these over the past few months. He's in his mid fifties, and one of his old work buddies (in his 70s) used to work on these cars when he was a young apprentice mechanic. Between the pair of them the engine has been restored to former glory, the bodywork restored and all the timber framing lovingly brought back to lustre.

I've watched from a distance as the project took shape, and have been really impressed with the quality of the workmanship and the pride that has gone into their work.

So you can imagine how shocked I was that they were having some serious problems with the electrics, and asked me to help. :eek:

I've recently got back from a day on the car. First fault indicators intermittently working, dodgy earth to relay unit. Full beams not working and full beam indicator on dash not working, miswiring rectified to the schematic in the Haynes.

Finally, and the really interesting bit was the rear indicators. They worked ok, but also came on when you pressed the foot brake. I checked and re-checked the schematic, and it was correct. The indicators were also the tail lights and the brake lights.

But at the back of the car was a seperate indicator unit, and seperate brake light / tail light unit. :confused:

It turns out the earlier travellers had all in one units, brake light/tail light/indicator. The arse end of this car was not original and had been sourced from ebay. So I deduced this logically by asking the right questions, and then suggested a modification to the wiring to operate the two units independantly.

My mate was sceptical, but when I pointed out I had been spot on so far, and he had asked me he should place his trust in me. So 30 minutes later, with the new cabling pulled through and the mods made to the relay unit we fired up the car and went through the lights checks.

IT ONLY FLIPPING WORKED.

:banana::banana::banana::banana::banana:
:banana::banana:
:banana::banana::banana::banana::banana:

What an adventure, and a priviledge to be a part of that restoration project in some small way. :)

And to help out a mate was fab to. :D

BrilloPad
5th May 2012, 17:25
:yay:

MarillionFan
5th May 2012, 17:28
Line one for Suity. It's a fella from Jackanory wondering if you're free for a few afternoons next week. :rolleyes:

suityou01
5th May 2012, 17:31
Line one for Suity. It's a fella from Jackanory wondering if you're free for a few afternoons next week. :rolleyes:

When you're overseas your kids love it when I read to them. :D

suityou01
5th May 2012, 17:33
Morris Minor Owners Club • View topic - Lights/Indicators (http://www.mmoc.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=40494)

See second post.

MarillionFan
5th May 2012, 17:37
When you're overseas your kids love it when I read to them. :D

When you're at home my kids love it when you read to them.:wink

AtW
5th May 2012, 17:38
blah blah blah

Did you get a new job or what? :mad

suityou01
5th May 2012, 17:41
Did you get a new job or what? :mad

Yes.

AtW
5th May 2012, 17:44
Yes.

And why ain't you working then to make up for downtime?

Lazy layabout BE GONE! :mad

mudskipper
5th May 2012, 17:47
Actually I reckon a pottering / tinkering project that you never expect to complete is a great way to de-stress at weekends. Probably healthier than knocking back a couple of bottles of wine too.

MarillionFan
5th May 2012, 17:51
Actually I reckon a pottering / tinkering project that you never expect to complete is a great way to de-stress at weekends. Probably healthier than knocking back a couple of bottles of wine too.

WSS

AtWs is called Majestic. :laugh

BrilloPad
5th May 2012, 18:40
Actually I reckon a pottering / tinkering project that you never expect to complete is a great way to de-stress at weekends.

I prefer a project with an end. Like the counting thread.

OwlHoot
5th May 2012, 18:43
Kudos for helping get it working and all that. But I've never understood why people want to restore those dreary, ugly-looking, tiny, grossly underpowered and unreliable 50s and 60s cars when they could just as well be doing the same with an old Bentley or sports car instead.

suityou01
5th May 2012, 18:45
Not the actual car, but just so the uneducated can see the charm :

http://slatford.co.uk/Pictures%20of%20Cars/Morris/Morris_Traveller.jpg

http://gardencentretv.co.uk/wordpress1/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/1960MorrisMinorA2.jpg

OwlHoot
5th May 2012, 18:49
Charm? It looks like a garden shed on wheels, and probably drives like one. :laugh

And worse still, I bet the engine sounds like a Chieftain tank even in normal driving.

suityou01
5th May 2012, 18:52
Charm? It looks like a garden shed on wheels, and probably drives like one. :laugh

And worse still, I bet the engine sounds like a Chieftain tank even in normal driving.

I saw the thread had an owly post, and quick as a flash opened the thread. This silver haired old timer will know a thing or two about the moggy I thought. Like a kid on Christmas morning I was opening your post. :rolleyes:

:wink

mudskipper
5th May 2012, 19:19
Charm? It looks like a garden shed on wheels, and probably drives like one. :laugh

And worse still, I bet the engine sounds like a Chieftain tank even in normal driving.

It's nostalgia. Most people never went in a Bentley or a sports car as kids. IT contractors didn't exist in those days...

mudskipper
5th May 2012, 19:20
WSS

AtWs is called Majestic. :laugh

:laugh

The_Equalizer
6th May 2012, 07:54
Kudos for helping get it working and all that. But I've never understood why people want to restore those dreary, ugly-looking, tiny, grossly underpowered and unreliable 50s and 60s cars when they could just as well be doing the same with an old Bentley or sports car instead.

It's a combination of a couple of factors. You'll find people hanker after cars their Dad had, or they had when seventeen. Also, the cost and complexity of working on a Minor and a Bentley are vastly different. Just working on and fix any car can be jolly satisfying. In fact I would highly recommend have a go at even the simple tasks such as servicing.

malvolio
6th May 2012, 10:52
Actaully the old Moggies were quite a hoot to drive once you put on some decent tyres. Never do more than 70, but you had to work at it. I also use to thash my mate's one many years ago; went quite well with the Broadspeed full race 1600 motor in it...

Then again there's a traveller down here from Charlie Ware's old place, slightly upgraded to have brakes, five-speed box and a few other things (such as a rather bigger motor), reputedly does 140 in a straight line and corners to suit. :bluelight

doodab
6th May 2012, 11:10
Kudos for helping get it working and all that. But I've never understood why people want to restore those dreary, ugly-looking, tiny, grossly underpowered and unreliable 50s and 60s cars when they could just as well be doing the same with an old Bentley or sports car instead.

Principally it's cost. And complexity. It's relatively easy to get parts for a massed produced car and these have fairly simple 4 cylinder OHV engines that were used in a huge range of cars including the mini. They are also pretty easy to work on, they had to be because back in the day local garages wouldn't have been that sophisticated and a lot of people would DIY.

I'd like to do something like a Lancia Beta or Alfa GTV.

malvolio
6th May 2012, 11:15
...I'd like to do something like a Lancia Beta ....

That would be the ultimate full body restoration project then. They bought back and scrapped the ones that hadn't rusted away already.

doodab
6th May 2012, 11:22
That would be the ultimate full body restoration project then. They bought back and scrapped the ones that hadn't rusted away already.

Yes, I think most of the surviving ones have been restored already.

suityou01
6th May 2012, 12:01
Principally it's cost. And complexity. It's relatively easy to get parts for a massed produced car and these have fairly simple 4 cylinder OHV engines that were used in a huge range of cars including the mini. They are also pretty easy to work on, they had to be because back in the day local garages wouldn't have been that sophisticated and a lot of people would DIY.

I'd like to do something like a Lancia Beta or Alfa GTV.

Dood, is there any subject you're not expert in? :wink

doodab
6th May 2012, 12:04
Dood, is there any subject you're not expert in? :wink

Yes. There are several.

Sysman
6th May 2012, 14:56
Morris Minor Owners Club • View topic - Lights/Indicators (http://www.mmoc.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=40494)

See second post.

Ah, you had me confused with the thread title.

Those are Morris Minor Travellers.

This is an Austin Mini Traveller:

http://seriouswheels.com/pics-1960-1969/1967-Austin-Mini-Minor-Traveller-ra-lr.jpg

Sysman
6th May 2012, 15:01
Charm? It looks like a garden shed on wheels, and probably drives like one. :laugh

And worse still, I bet the engine sounds like a Chieftain tank even in normal driving.

I had one back in the seventies. Somewhat surprisingly it got me through a bad winter - I never once got stuck in the snow with it.

The bicycle like narrow tyres got surprisingly good traction in the snow,

A couple of hundred weight of paving slabs and bags of sand in the back helped too,

Sysman
6th May 2012, 15:10
Actaully the old Moggies were quite a hoot to drive once you put on some decent tyres. Never do more than 70, but you had to work at it. I also use to thash my mate's one many years ago; went quite well with the Broadspeed full race 1600 motor in it...

Then again there's a traveller down here from Charlie Ware's old place, slightly upgraded to have brakes, five-speed box and a few other things (such as a rather bigger motor), reputedly does 140 in a straight line and corners to suit. :bluelight

I heard a tale that the Manchester police got sick of trying to chase villains in their standard issue Moggies so put a Rover V8 into one.

The Moggie is also a favourite of Tiff Needle Tiff Needell Sliding The Morris 1000 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ooBJ2Z2sZvo&feature=related)